Genomics

Genomics is the study of the complete set of DNA of an organism, including its sequence, organization, function, and evolution. The study of genomics incorporates a wide variety of experimental, computational, and statistical methodologies and has been greatly accelerated in recent years with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, high-density molecular assays (e.g. microarrays, droplet PCR), and advances in computational biology and biostatistics. Genomic research within the Department of Biology spans a wide range of subdisciplines including functional genomics, population and evolutionary genomics, and developmental genomics.

Daniele Armaleo, Ph.D.

Daniele Armaleo, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of the Practice of Biology

My research centers on the developmental and molecular biology of lichens, well differentiated symbioses between two or three evolutionarily unrelated organisms: specialized fungi on the one hand and algae or cyanobacteria on the... Full Profile »

Ryan Baugh, Ph.D.

Ryan Baugh, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

We study nutritional control of development in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. We are interested in the signaling pathways and gene regulatory mechanisms that enable the worm to reversibly arrest development and resist stress in response to starvation. We are also interested in epigenetic... Full Profile »

Philip Benfey, Ph.D.

Philip Benfey, Ph.D.

Paul Kramer Professor of Biology in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences

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Xinnian Dong, Ph.D.

Xinnian Dong, Ph.D.

Arts and Sciences Professor of Biology in the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences

Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, my laboratory studies the mechanisms of plant defense against microbial pathogens. We focus on a specific response known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). SAR,... Full Profile »

Steve Haase, Ph.D.

Steve Haase, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Our group is broadly interested in understanding the biological clock mechanisms that control the timing of events during the cell division cycle. In 2008, the Haase group proposed a new model in which a complex network of sequentially activated transcription factors regulates the precise timing of... Full Profile »

Dan Kiehart, Ph.D.

Dan Kiehart, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology

Our intellectual focus is on identifying determinants of cell shape that function during development. Utilizing molecular genetic and reverse genetic approaches in Drosophila, we have shown that conventional nonmuscle myosin is necessary for driving both cell division and post-mitotic cell shape... Full Profile »

Paul Mitaari Magwene

Paul Mitaari Magwene

Associate Professor of Biology

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Prof Tom Mitchell-Olds, Ph.D.

Prof Tom Mitchell-Olds, Ph.D.

Newman Ivey White Professor of Biology in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences

We study genetic variation in plant populations, focusing on genes that influence traits controlling plant performance in an environmental context – a central theme throughout our research in natural and agricultural populations. Much of our work is focused on the genes that affect ecological... Full Profile »

Gustavo Monteiro Silva, Ph.D.

Gustavo Monteiro Silva, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biology

My main research goal is to understand and be able to control how cells respond to stressful and harmful conditions, which are the underlying causes of many human diseases. To achieve this goal, I study cellular response to stress at the protein level and aim to characterize the different... Full Profile »

Mohamed Noor

Mohamed Noor

Professor of Biology

Research in my laboratory strives to understand what genetic changes contribute to the formation of new species, and how the process of genetic recombination affects both species formation and molecular evolution. I've been fascinated at how often genetic recombination plays a major role in any... Full Profile »

Zhen-Ming Pei, PH.D.

Zhen-Ming Pei, PH.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

My laboratory is interested in the early signaling events by which plants sense environmental signals and decode to give the appropriate responses. Upon perception of external signals, cell surface receptors trigger an increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration, which is mediated by ion... Full Profile »

Allen Rodrigo, Ph.D.

Allen Rodrigo, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor of Biology

My research focuses on evolutionary bioinformatics and computatioanl biology. In particular, I am interested in the development of novel methods to study the evolution of genes, genomes, organisms and species. Full Profile »

Prof Amy Schmid, Ph.D.

Prof Amy Schmid, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Although life science research has entered the post-genomic era, we still understand little about the diversity of microbial life on earth. Information is particularly lacking on microbial extremophiles, which thrive at the limits of life. Extremophiles can be found in deep-sea hydrothermal vents... Full Profile »

Marcy K. Uyenoyama

Marcy K. Uyenoyama

Professor of Biology

Marcy Uyenoyama studies mechanisms of evolutionary change at the molecular and population levels. Among the questions under study include the prediction and detection of the effects of natural selection on genomic structure. A major area of research addresses the development of maximum-likelihood... Full Profile »

John Willis, Ph.D.

John Willis, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology

We conduct research on broad issues in evolutionary genetics, and we are currently addressing questions relating to the evolution of adaptation, reproductive isolation, breeding systems, inbreeding depression, and... Full Profile »

Gregory Wray, Ph.D.

Gregory Wray, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology

I study the evolution of genes and genomes with the broad aim of understanding the origins of biological diversity. My approach focuses on changes in the expression of genes using both empirical and computational approaches and spans scales of biological organization from single nucleotides... Full Profile »