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Evolutionary Developmental Biology: Evolving Forms, Patterns, & Processes

How did the whale get its blowhole? How did the cactus get its spines? The emerging science of evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) seeks to answer questions about how evolutionary changes to development shape bizarre body plans, unique life cycles, elegant color patterns, and more. This course will explore the evolution of novel structures, patterns, and processes as well as the genetics underlying them across plants and animals. Students will read and discuss selected book chapters and primary literature.

Advanced Experimental Physics

One of several undergraduate courses on experimental physics techniques suitable for physics and biophysics majors. Identical in content and method to Physics 364L except it requires two half semester advanced laboratory projects for one full semester credit. Biophysics-related laboratory projects are available. Includes written and oral presentation of results. Prerequisite: Physics 264L. Instructor: Bomze, staff

Ecology of Human Health

Humans are the dominant species on Earth and ecology is key to understanding the multiple feedbacks through which their activities affect human health. Fundamental principles of ecology, from population to ecosystem levels, will be examined through the lens of human health. Topics include human population growth and carrying capacity, why we age, infectious disease dynamics, the microbiome and human health, sustainable agriculture and food security, sustainable harvest of wild foods, dynamics of pollutants in food webs, ecosystem services to humans, and human impacts of climate change.

Gateway to Biology: Molecular Biology, Genetics & Evolution

Major concepts in modern biology through the lens of molecular biology, genetics and evolution. The structure and function of genes at the molecular, organismal, and population level. Molecular mechanisms including replication, transcription, translation, and DNA mutation and repair. Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, genetic mapping, evidence for evolution, natural selection, genetic drift, speciation, molecular evolution, phylogenetic analysis. Relevance to human diseases, social implications of genetics and biotechnology.

Race, Genomics, and Society

The field of genetics has been at the forefront of discourse concerning the concept of “race” in humans. This course explores human history, human variation, human identity, and human health through a broad range of enduring and emerging themes and challenging questions related to race and genetics (and now, genomics) on a global scale. Students will acquire knowledge and skills required for integrative analysis of the relevant scientific, ethical, legal, societal, cultural, and psychosocial issues.

Genome Technologies

Comprehensive overview of genome science technologies, analytical tools, clinical applications, and related issues. Exposure to a range of technologies currently used in research and some in clinical practice, as well as the tools to interrogate the large data-sets generated by these technologies. Projects will explore the range of datasets publicly available and analysis of genomic datasets. Prerequisites: Biology 201L

Marine Ecology of the Pacific

Ecology of the rocky intertidal, kelp forest, and mud flat habitats. Introduction to marine mammals, fish and other large West Coast vertebrates. Taught in Beaufort, with preparation for fieldwork before and analysis and presentation of projects after required one-week intensive field experience on the coast of Northern California. Prerequisite: Introductory course in Biology or Environmental Science and consent of instructor. Instructor: Johnson

Coalenscence and Evolution

Survey of theoretical and empirical aspects of modern population genetics in the post-coalescence era. Coincident with the development of coalescence theory, evolutionary biology began a profound and pervasive transformation. This course presents the basics of coalescence theory. It builds upon this perspective to address an array of summary statistics and inference methods developed for the analysis of genomic data. Instructor: Uyenoyama

Primate Evolutionary Genetics

Genetic perspectives on primate evolution. Interpretation of molecular data in understanding primate origins, historical and present-day distributions, and natural selection. Topics include: the genetic signature of pathogen pressure; population differentiation and local adaptation to ecological differences; genetic signatures of admixture, including in the human lineage; molecular marker-based tests of kin-biased behavior and paternal care; primate behavioral genetics and genomics; phylogenetic methods to investigate the evolution of primate social structures; conservation genetics.

Deep-Sea Science and Environmental Management

Explores ecosystems in the deep sea, including fundamental aspects of geology, chemistry, and biodiversity;behavioral, physiological, and biochemical adaptations of organisms (primarily invertebrate, but may include microbial and vertebrate components) to deep-sea benthic and bentho-paelagic environments will be introduced. Students will gain an understanding of the ecosystem services of the deep sea; issues in deep-sea environmental management arising from exploitation of deep-sea resources will be discussed. For undergraduates only.

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