Her Research Path Winds Through a Plant’s Growth

The beauty of research is that it allows you to take control of your own path.

“We are very lucky to be in the position to decide what we love to do and do it,” says Tai-ping Sun, a Duke biology professor studying the plant hormone GA. Researchers get to take control of their own path, she said. Every day is an opportunity to learn something new, design and analyze experiments and decide what direction to take.

Sun studies the GA signaling pathway because it regulates plant growth and development. She got interested in GA when she was a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University in 1988. At the time, a lot of tools needed to be developed. As she was developing new tools to clone plant genes, she came across a GA mutant that was different. Her research is very important to understanding how the mutations in the GA signaling pathways can control the height of a plant. In fact, she says, GA mutations were one of the reasons for the success of the “Green Revolution” in the 1960s.

 

Sun’s current research revolves around identifying the mechanisms of the cell that make GA hormones and identifying how GA mutations have affected this pathway. Her team has identified important facets of the pathway, such as the structure and function of the nuclear receptors that allow for transcription that drives the GA response. Her team has also identified transcription factors that control the rate of the signaling pathway such as the DELLA proteins that act as master growth repressors to inhibit GA response. In fact one of her favorite discoveries is that GA triggers destruction of the DELLA proteins to activate the GA signaling pathway.

A figure from a 2004 paper by Sun on plant growth.
All three of the mutants grew less well than wild type plants.

“As a scientist, the most exciting thing is to discuss experimental data, and then trying to deduce hypothesis or modify models and then come up with new experiments for testing,” she said.

But research is not without its challenges, Sun says “not everything that you do works out the first time.” That’s why she says that as a researcher the most important thing is to have an interest in your field as well as perseverance.

Guest post by Anika Jain, Class of 2021, NC School of Science and Math