Electives

Advanced Experimental Physics

One of several undergraduate courses on experimental physics techniques suitable for physics and biophysics majors. Identical in content and method to Physics 364L except it requires two half semester advanced laboratory projects for one full semester credit. Biophysics-related laboratory projects are available. Includes written and oral presentation of results. Prerequisite: Physics 264L. Instructor: Bomze, staff

Race, Genomics, and Society

The field of genetics has been at the forefront of discourse concerning the concept of “race” in humans. This course explores human history, human variation, human identity, and human health through a broad range of enduring and emerging themes and challenging questions related to race and genetics (and now, genomics) on a global scale. Students will acquire knowledge and skills required for integrative analysis of the relevant scientific, ethical, legal, societal, cultural, and psychosocial issues.

Genome Technologies

Comprehensive overview of genome science technologies, analytical tools, clinical applications, and related issues. Exposure to a range of technologies currently used in research and some in clinical practice, as well as the tools to interrogate the large data-sets generated by these technologies. Projects will explore the range of datasets publicly available and analysis of genomic datasets. Prerequisites: Biology 201L

Coalenscence and Evolution

Survey of theoretical and empirical aspects of modern population genetics in the post-coalescence era. Coincident with the development of coalescence theory, evolutionary biology began a profound and pervasive transformation. This course presents the basics of coalescence theory. It builds upon this perspective to address an array of summary statistics and inference methods developed for the analysis of genomic data. Instructor: Uyenoyama

Primate Evolutionary Genetics

Genetic perspectives on primate evolution. Interpretation of molecular data in understanding primate origins, historical and present-day distributions, and natural selection. Topics include: the genetic signature of pathogen pressure; population differentiation and local adaptation to ecological differences; genetic signatures of admixture, including in the human lineage; molecular marker-based tests of kin-biased behavior and paternal care; primate behavioral genetics and genomics; phylogenetic methods to investigate the evolution of primate social structures; conservation genetics.

Grant Writing

Hands-on instruction for preparing grant proposals; preparation and revision of an NSF-format proposal; evaluation and critique of proposals prepared by fellow class members.

Unoccupied Aircraft Systems in Scientific Research

Comprehensive exploration of current unoccupied aircraft systems technologies in coastal and marine research, including aeronautical concepts, rules and regulations, safety, mission planning, aircraft design, payload selection, operational procedures, maintenance, data management and data analysis. Includes a full overview of current and emerging remote sensing applications for monitoring marine species and habitats.

Coastal Watershed Science and Policy

Examination of coastal watersheds, their biological function, and how anthropogenic modifications impact wetlands, estuaries and near shore coastal ecosystems. Human ecosystem modifications addressed in terms of alterations caused by forestry, agriculture, highways, rural housing, suburban development, urban development and industry. Discussion of human and environmental health as well as ecosystem services provided by coastal systems (biogeochemical cycling and “blue’ carbon).

Genomics of Adaptation: A Modern Look at Evolution

Contemporary studies of how populations and species evolved adaptations to their ecological habitats. Focus on modern methods of genome mapping and sequence data and analysis in wild populations that can identify genetic changes that contributed to ecological adaptations. Emphasis on case studies of genomics of adaptation in plant and animal systems, including humans and our adaptations to environments that our ancestors encountered as they colonized diverse habitats throughout the world.

Systematic Biology

Laboratory version of Biology 556. Theory and practice of identification, species discovery, phylogeny reconstruction, classification, and nomenclature. Prerequisite: Biology 202L or equivalent. One course. 4 graduate units.

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