Electives

Marine Climate Change

Exploration of climate change science focusing on marine ecosystems and inhabitants - specifically ocean acidification, warming and sea level rise. Factors causing climate change, and how those vary spatially, focusing on sensitive polar ecosystems and marine mammal populations. Critical examination of climate change modeling using EdGCM (research-grade Global Climate Model), focusing on how scientists use models, observations/theory to predict climate, and assumptions/uncertainty implicit in modeling.

Computing on the Genome

This course will provide an introduction to key concepts in the genome sciences, using tools and concepts from computational biology and bioinformatics. Topics to be covered include genome structure, function, variation, and evolution. Students will learn computational and statistical methods for describing and quantifying various aspects of genome biology and will apply these tools to real world data. Prerequisite: Familiarity with molecular biology concepts such as DNA replication, transcription, and translation. No prior programming experience is required.

Cell Shape(s) and Dynamics

Cell shape and shape change are fundamental features of biological development and homeostasis. We investigate the intimate relationship between cellular structure and function at molecular, sub-cellular, cellular and tissue length scales. We study a range of cell types, from the very simple (e.g., red blood cells) to those that are structurally complex (e.g., epithelia, muscle and nerve). We integrate information from studies in vivo, in vitro, in cell free systems and on purified proteins.

Human Evolutionary Genetics

An evolutionary perspective on human genetics and genomics, with an emphasis on current models and inference methods using medically important examples. The mechanisms of evolution shaping human genetic variation, as well as inference of evolutionary processes from genetic data. Topics include: population differences in disease risk; adaptation to local environments and pathogens; identifying regions of the genome underlying traits; models of neutral variation, migration, and genetic ancestry. Computational and quantitative skills will be emphasized throughout.

Evolutionary Genomics

The unification of genomic data, bioinformatic analysis, and evolutionary theory has transformed our understanding of human history, our place within the Tree of Life, and the impact that our species is having on those with whom we share the planet. This course will draw from the primary literature to familiarize students with the multifaceted power of genomics, with a slant towards examining human history and disease from an evolutionary perspective.

Advanced Experimental Physics

One of several undergraduate courses on experimental physics techniques suitable for physics and biophysics majors. Identical in content and method to Physics 364L except it requires two half semester advanced laboratory projects for one full semester credit. Biophysics-related laboratory projects are available. Includes written and oral presentation of results. Prerequisite: Physics 264L. Instructor: Bomze, staff

Race, Genomics, and Society

The field of genetics has been at the forefront of discourse concerning the concept of “race” in humans. This course explores human history, human variation, human identity, and human health through a broad range of enduring and emerging themes and challenging questions related to race and genetics (and now, genomics) on a global scale. Students will acquire knowledge and skills required for integrative analysis of the relevant scientific, ethical, legal, societal, cultural, and psychosocial issues.

Genome Technologies

Comprehensive overview of genome science technologies, analytical tools, clinical applications, and related issues. Exposure to a range of technologies currently used in research and some in clinical practice, as well as the tools to interrogate the large data-sets generated by these technologies. Projects will explore the range of datasets publicly available and analysis of genomic datasets. Prerequisites: Biology 201L

Coalenscence and Evolution

Survey of theoretical and empirical aspects of modern population genetics in the post-coalescence era. Coincident with the development of coalescence theory, evolutionary biology began a profound and pervasive transformation. This course presents the basics of coalescence theory. It builds upon this perspective to address an array of summary statistics and inference methods developed for the analysis of genomic data. Instructor: Uyenoyama

Primate Evolutionary Genetics

Genetic perspectives on primate evolution. Interpretation of molecular data in understanding primate origins, historical and present-day distributions, and natural selection. Topics include: the genetic signature of pathogen pressure; population differentiation and local adaptation to ecological differences; genetic signatures of admixture, including in the human lineage; molecular marker-based tests of kin-biased behavior and paternal care; primate behavioral genetics and genomics; phylogenetic methods to investigate the evolution of primate social structures; conservation genetics.

Pages