NS

Integrative Neurosci Lab

Gain skills necessary to conduct neuroscience research and integrate findings from multiple levels of analysis (molecular, cellular and behavioral). Team-based learning format and collaboration with neuroscience lab to generate, analyze, and communicate novel scientific findings. Experimentation will occur in a model organism and may include PCR, live cell imaging and/or behavioral conditioning experiments. Prerequisite: Neuroscience 101.

Introduction to Biophysics

How theory and experimental techniques from physics can be used to analyze and understand biological structure and function, including chemical, mechanical, electrical, collective, and information-processing aspects. Prerequisites: Biology 201L and knowledge of statistical physics by taking either Physics 363 or Chemistry 311.

Biological Clocks: How Organisms Keep Time

From sleep/wake cycles to flower opening to cell division and malaria infections; all organisms and cells display rhythmic behaviors. Course will focus on genetic and molecular networks that comprise clocks regulating cell division and circadian rhythms. Quantitative aspects clock networks will be examined from the perspective of data analysis and dynamical models. Class will include lectures, primary literature readings, and in-class projects. Prerequisites: Math 112L or equivalent, and Biology 20 or Biology 201L. Instructor: Haase and Harer

Biodiversity of Alaska

Ecology/biodiversity and conservation in Alaska: identification and natural history of native plants and animals including both terrestrial and marine species, biogeographic history and patterns, native American cultures, conservation issues surrounding Alaskan natural resources. Regional, national, and geopolitical issues surrounding development and conservation in Alaska and elsewhere in the arctic.

Topics in Herpetology

Introduction to diversity and biology of amphibians and non-avian reptiles. Emphases on their evolutionary history, including the relationships among the major taxonomic groups and to other taxa. Topics include evolutionary adaptations with regard to life history, physiology, behavior. Human interactions and species conservation. Examples from North Carolina and the Southeastern US. Prerequisites: Biology 20 or Biology 202L. Optional field trips. Instructor: Grunwald

Physiological Genetics of Disease

An exploration of how we have come to understand the relationships between genes and traits, with a focus on traits of biomedical importance. We explore how physiological systems biology can be used to understand the causal pathways by which genes affect traits. Examples will be taken largely from the biomedical literature with a focus on genetic diseases and the roles of genetic background and environment in determining how (and why) genes affect traits. Readings and class participation, short papers and oral presentations on research projects. Nijhout

Genomics of Adaptation: A Modern Look at Evolution

Contemporary studies of how populations and species evolved adaptations to their ecological habitats. Focus on modern methods of genome mapping and sequence data and analysis in wild populations that can identify genetic changes that contributed to ecological adaptations. Emphasis on case studies of genomics of adaptation in plant and animal systems, including humans and our adaptations to environments that our ancestors encountered as they colonized diverse habitats throughout the world.

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