David R. Sherwood

Associate Professor in the Department of Biology

Office: 
Box
Campus Box: 
90338
Phone: 
(919) 613-8192
Fax: 
919-660-7293

Lab Site: http://sites.duke.edu/sherwoodlab

Research Interests: 

Our research is directed at elucidating mechanisms underlying morphogenetic processes in development. We primarily use the model system C. elegans in our research, and combine powerful genetic and systems biology approaches with live-cell imaging to address three main topics:  Tissue Remodeling and ConnectionA major focus of the lab is the understanding of mechanisms underlying uterine-vulval attachment. A key aspect of this process is the invasion of a single uterine cell, the anchor cell, through the uterine and vulval basement membranes, which initiates uterine-vulval connection. The ability of cells to invade through basement membrane is crucial for many developmental processes and remains one of the least understood aspects in the progression of cancer. We have begun to apply what we learn in the anchor cell to better understand how cancer cells become invasive. Our group also examines other aspects of uterine-vulval attachment, including control of cell division, cell-cell signaling, cell-cell attachments and basement membrane remodeling.  Stem Cell-Niche InteractionsWe are examining the cell biological aspects of cell-cell and cell-basement membrane establishment of the germ stem cell niche. We are particularly interested in how somatic and germ cells interact to maintain the germ stem cells. We have made the surprising discovery that germ cells that escape their niche appear capable of inducing naïve somatic cells to take on the role of the niche cells. We are conducting screens and performing live-cell imaging studies to understand this novel behavior.Nutritional Regulation of Late Larval Development In collaboration with Dr. Ryan Baugh's lab, we are examining the developmental response of late larvae to starvation. We have identified specific developmental checkpoints that larvae enter in response to the absence of food. These studies have many fascinating implications in our understanding of how cells arrest at specific developmental time-points, how an organism and cells enter and exit quiescent states, and how these impinge on life-span. Members of our group are trained in a diverse range of scientific approaches and join a vibrant scientific community at Duke University, the Research Triangle region and the worldwide group of worm researchers.

Our research is directed at elucidating mechanisms underlying morphogenetic processes in development. We primarily use the model system C. elegans in our research, and combine powerful genetic and systems biology approaches with live-cell imaging to address three main topics:   Tissue Remodeling and Connection A major focus of the lab is the understanding of mechanisms underlying uterine-vulval attachment. A key aspect of this process is the invasion of a single uterine cell, the anchor cell, through the uterine and vulval basement membranes, which initiates uterine-vulval connection. The ability of cells to invade through basement membrane is crucial for many developmental processes and remains one of the least understood aspects in the progression of cancer. We have begun to apply what we learn in the anchor cell to better understand how cancer cells become invasive. Our group also examines other aspects of uterine-vulval attachment, including control of cell division, cell-cell signaling, cell-cell attachments and basement membrane remodeling.  Stem Cell-Niche Interactions We are examining the cell biological aspects of cell-cell and cell-basement membrane establishment of the germ stem cell niche. We are particularly interested in how somatic and germ cells interact to maintain the germ stem cells. We have made the surprising discovery that germ cells that escape their niche appear capable of inducing naïve somatic cells to take on the role of the niche cells. We are conducting screens and performing live-cell imaging studies to understand this novel behavior.
Nutritional Regulation of Late Larval Development  In collaboration with Dr. Ryan Baugh's lab, we are examining the developmental response of late larvae to starvation. We have identified specific developmental checkpoints that larvae enter in response to the absence of food. These studies have many fascinating implications in our understanding of how cells arrest at specific developmental time-points, how an organism and cells enter and exit quiescent states, and how these impinge on life-span. 
Members of our group are trained in a diverse range of scientific approaches and join a vibrant scientific community at Duke University, the Research Triangle region and the worldwide group of worm researchers.

Education

  • Postdoctoral Fellowship 1999, California Institute of Technology

  • Ph.D. 1997, Duke University

  • B.A. 1990, Wesleyan University

Papers Published

Basement membranes., 3, 2017
Jayadev, R; Sherwood, DR, Current Biology. 27 vol. (6); pp. R207-R211

Boundary cells restrict dystroglycan trafficking to control basement membrane sliding during tissue remodeling., 9, 2016
McClatchey, ST; Wang, Z; Linden, LM; Hastie, EL; Wang, L; Shen, W; Chen, A; Chi, Q; Sherwood, DR, eLife. 5

Tissue Sculpting by Fibrils., 7, 2016
Jayadev, R; Sherwood, DR, Developmental Cell. 38 vol. (1); pp. 1-3

SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane., 2, 2016
Morrissey, MA; Jayadev, R; Miley, GR; Blebea, CA; Chi, Q; Ihara, S; Sherwood, DR, PLoS genetics. 12 vol. (2); pp. e1005905

A new front in cell invasion: The invadopodial membrane., 11, 2016
Hastie, EL; Sherwood, DR, European Journal of Cell Biology. 95 vol. (11); pp. 441-448

A Sensitized Screen for Genes Promoting Invadopodia Function In Vivo: CDC-42 and Rab GDI-1 Direct Distinct Aspects of Invadopodia Formation., 1, 2016
Lohmer, LL; Clay, MR; Naegeli, KM; Chi, Q; Ziel, JW; Hagedorn, EJ; Park, JE; Jayadev, R; Sherwood, DR, PLoS genetics. 12 vol. (1); pp. e1005786

A developmental biologist's "outside-the-cell" thinking., 8, 2015
Sherwood, DR, The Journal of Cell Biology. 210 vol. (3); pp. 369-372

The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis., 6, 2015
Wei, X; Howell, AS; Dong, X; Taylor, CA; Cooper, RC; Zhang, J; Zou, W; Sherwood, DR; Shen, K, eLife. 4 pp. e06963

Basement Membranes in the Worm: A Dynamic Scaffolding that Instructs Cellular Behaviors and Shapes Tissues., 1, 2015
Clay, MR; Sherwood, DR, Current Topis in Membranes. 76 pp. 337-371

MIG-10 (Lamellipodin) stabilizes invading cell adhesion to basement membrane and is a negative transcriptional target of EGL-43 in C. elegans., 9, 2014
Wang, L; Shen, W; Lei, S; Matus, D; Sherwood, D; Wang, Z, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 452 vol. (3); pp. 328-333

UNC-6 (netrin) stabilizes oscillatory clustering of the UNC-40 (DCC) receptor to orient polarity., 9, 2014
Wang, Z; Linden, LM; Naegeli, KM; Ziel, JW; Chi, Q; Hagedorn, EJ; Savage, NS; Sherwood, DR, The Journal of Cell Biology. 206 vol. (5); pp. 619-633

MIG-10 (Lamellipodin) stabilizes invading cell adhesion to basement membrane and is a negative transcriptional target of EGL-43 in C. elegans, 9, 2014
Wang, L; Shen, W; Lei, S; Matus, D; Sherwood, D; Wang, Z, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 452 vol. (3); pp. 328-333

Identification of late larval stage developmental checkpoints in Caenorhabditis elegans regulated by insulin/IGF and steroid hormone signaling pathways., 6, 2014
Schindler, AJ; Baugh, LR; Sherwood, DR, PLoS genetics. 10 vol. (6); pp. e1004426

Invadopodia and basement membrane invasion in vivo., 5, 2014
Lohmer, LL; Kelley, LC; Hagedorn, EJ; Sherwood, DR, Cell adhesion & migration. 8 vol. (3); pp. 246-255

In situ imaging in C. elegans reveals developmental regulation of microtubule dynamics., 4, 2014
Lacroix, B; Bourdages, KG; Dorn, JF; Ihara, S; Sherwood, DR; Maddox, PS; Maddox, AS, Developmental Cell. 29 vol. (2); pp. 203-216

Repurposing an endogenous degradation system for rapid and targeted depletion of C. elegans proteins., 12, 2014
Armenti, ST; Lohmer, LL; Sherwood, DR; Nance, J, Development (Cambridge). 141 vol. (23); pp. 4640-4647

B-LINK: a hemicentin, plakin, and integrin-dependent adhesion system that links tissues by connecting adjacent basement membranes., 11, 2014
Morrissey, MA; Keeley, DP; Hagedorn, EJ; McClatchey, STH; Chi, Q; Hall, DH; Sherwood, DR, Developmental Cell. 31 vol. (3); pp. 319-331

The netrin receptor DCC focuses invadopodia-driven basement membrane transmigration in vivo., 6, 2013
Hagedorn, EJ; Ziel, JW; Morrissey, MA; Linden, LM; Wang, Z; Chi, Q; Johnson, SA; Sherwood, DR, The Journal of Cell Biology. 201 vol. (6); pp. 903-913

Morphogenesis of the caenorhabditis elegans vulva., 1, 2013
Schindler, AJ; Sherwood, DR, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Developmental Biology. 2 vol. (1); pp. 75-95

Cell Invasion through basement membrane: The netrin receptor DCC guides the way., 0, 2013
Morrissey, M. A., Hagedorn, E. J., Sherwood D. R., Worm. 2 (3) pp. e26169-1-6

Netrin Stabilizes UNC-40(DCC)-Generated Oscillatory Polarity to Direct Anchor Cell Invasion in C. elegans, 0, 2012
Wang, Z; Ziel, JW; Chi, Q; Hagedorn, EJ; Sherwood, DR, Cell.

The UNC-40(DCC) Receptor Mediates a Morphogenetic Switch that Directs C. elegans Anchor Cell Invasion Across Basement Membrane, 0, 2012
Hagedorn, EJ; Ziel, JW; Morrissey, MA; Linden, L; Wang, Z; Chi, Q; Johnson, SA; Sherwood, DR, Nature Cell Biology.

The transcription factor HLH-2/E/Daughterless regulates anchor cell invasion across basement membrane in C. elegans., 9, 2011
Schindler, AJ; Sherwood, DR, Dev Biol. 357 vol. (2); pp. 380-391

Basement membrane sliding and targeted adhesion remodels tissue boundaries during uterine-vulval attachment in Caenorhabditis elegans., 6, 2011
Ihara, S; Hagedorn, EJ; Morrissey, MA; Chi, Q; Motegi, F; Kramer, JM; Sherwood, DR, Nat Cell Biol. 13 vol. (6); pp. 641-651

Cell invasion through basement membrane: the anchor cell breaches the barrier., 10, 2011
Hagedorn, EJ; Sherwood, DR, Curr Opin Cell Biol. 23 vol. (5); pp. 589-596

Dissection of genetic pathways in C. elegans., December, 2011
Wang, Z; Sherwood, DR, Methods Cell Biol. (December, 2011) 106 pp. 113-157

In vivo identification of regulators of cell invasion across basement membranes., 5, 2010
Matus, DQ; Li, X-Y; Durbin, S; Agarwal, D; Chi, Q; Weiss, SJ; Sherwood, DR, Sci Signal. 3 vol. (120); pp. ra35

Roles for netrin signaling outside of axon guidance: a view from the worm., 5, 2010
Ziel, JW; Sherwood, DR, Dev Dyn. 239 vol. (5); pp. 1296-1305

Science signaling podcast: 11 May 2010, 0, 2010
Matus, DQ; Sherwood, DR; Vanhook, AM, Science Signaling. 3 vol. (121); pp. pc10

Science Signaling Podcast: 11 May 2010, 0, 2010
Matus, DQ; Sherwood, DR; VanHook, AM, Science Signaling. 3 (121) vol. (pc10); pp. pc10

An expression screen for RhoGEF genes involved in C. elegans gonadogenesis., 9, 2009
Ziel, JW; Matus, DQ; Sherwood, DR, Gene Expression Patterns. 9 vol. (6); pp. 397-403

Integrin acts upstream of netrin signaling to regulate formation of the anchor cell's invasive membrane in C. elegans., 8, 2009
Hagedorn, EJ; Yashiro, H; Ziel, JW; Ihara, S; Wang, Z; Sherwood, DR, Developmental Cell. 17 vol. (2); pp. 187-198

David Sherwood: invasive procedures. Interview by Ben Short., 5, 2009
Sherwood, D, The Journal of Cell Biology. 185 vol. (4); pp. 568-569

UNC-6 (netrin) orients the invasive membrane of the anchor cell in C. elegans., 2, 2009
Ziel, JW; Hagedorn, EJ; Audhya, A; Sherwood, DR, Nature Cell Biology. 11 vol. (2); pp. 183-189

Cell invasion through basement membranes: an anchor of understanding., 5, 2006
Sherwood, DR, Trends in Cell Biology. 16 vol. (5); pp. 250-256

FOS-1 promotes basement-membrane removal during anchor-cell invasion in C. elegans, 0, 2005
Sherwood, DR; Butler, JA; Kramer, JM; Sternberg, PW, Cell. 121 vol. (6); pp. 951-962

Erratum: Gene expression markers for Caenorhabditis elegans vulval cells (Gene Expression Patterns (2002) vol. 2 (235-241)), 0, 2003
Inoue, T; Sherwood, DR; Aspöck, G; Butler, JA; Gupta, BP; Kirouac, M; Wang, M; Lee, P-Y; Kramer, JM; Hope, I; Bürglin, TR; Sternberg, PW, Gene Expression Patterns. 3 vol. (4); pp. 544-

Anchor cell invasion into the vulval epithelium in C. elegans, 0, 2003
Sherwood, DR; Sternberg, PW, Developmental Cell. 5 vol. (1); pp. 21-31

Caenorhabditis elegans cog-1 locus encodes GTX/Nkx6.1 homeodomain proteins and regulates multiple aspects of reproductive system development, 0, 2002
Palmer, RE; Inoue, T; Sherwood, DR; Jiang, LI; Sternberg, PW, Developmental Biology. 252 vol. (2); pp. 202-213

Gene expression markers for Caenorhabditis elegans vulval cells, 0, 2002
Inoue, T; Sherwood, DR; Aspöck, G; Butler, JA; Gupta, BP; Kirouac, M; Wang, M; Lee, P-Y; Kramer, JM; Hope, I; Bürglin, TR; Sternberg, PW, Gene Expression Patterns. 2 vol. (3-4); pp. 235-241

Gene expression markers for Caenorhabditis elegans vulval cells, 0, 2002
Inoue, T; Sherwood, DR; Aspöckb, G; Butler, JA; Gupta, BP; Kirouac, M; Wang, M; Lee, P-Y; Kramer, JM; Hope, I; Bürglin, TR; Sternberg, PW, Mechanisms of Development. 119 vol. (SUPPL. 1); pp. S203-S209

LvNotch signaling plays a dual role in regulating the position of the ectoderm-endoderm boundary in the sea urchin embryo., 6, 2001
Sherwood, DR; McClay, DR, Development (Cambridge). 128 vol. (12); pp. 2221-2232

LvNotch signaling mediates secondary mesenchyme specification in the sea urchin embryo., 4, 1999
Sherwood, DR; McClay, DR, Development (Cambridge). 126 vol. (8); pp. 1703-1713

Identification and localization of a sea urchin Notch homologue: insights into vegetal plate regionalization and Notch receptor regulation., 9, 1997
Sherwood, DR; McClay, DR, Development (Cambridge). 124 vol. (17); pp. 3363-3374

Cell adhesion and cell signaling at gastrulation in the sea urchin, 0, 1995
McClay, DR; Miller, JR; Logan, CY; Hertzler, PL; Bachman, ES; Matese, JC; Sherwood, DR; Armstrong, NA, Theriogenology. 44 vol. (8); pp. 1145-1165

Papers Submitted

Cell division and targeted cell cycle arrest opens and stabilizes basement membrane gaps. in Nature Communications 6, 2014
Matus, DQ; Chang, E; Makohon-Moore, SC; Hagedorn, MA; Chi, Q; Sherwood, DR

MIG-10 (lamellipodin) has netrin-independent functions and is a FOS-1A transcriptional target during anchor cell invasion in C. elegans. in Development (Cambridge) 3, 2014
Wang, Z; Chi, Q; Sherwood, DR

ADF/cofilin promotes invadopodial membrane recycling during cell invasion in vivo. in The Journal of Cell Biology 3, 2014
Hagedorn, EJ; Kelley, LC; Naegeli, KM; Wang, Z; Chi, Q; Sherwood, DR

Traversing the basement membrane in vivo: a diversity of strategies. in The Journal of Cell Biology 2, 2014
Kelley, LC; Lohmer, LL; Hagedorn, EJ; Sherwood, DR

Identification of Nutritionally Regulated Developmental Checkpoints in the Late Larval Stages of Caenorhabditis elegans in PLOS Genetics (In Review) 0, 2013
Schindler, A. J., Baugh, L. R., Sherwood, D. R.

The receptor DCC nucleates oscillatory, self-organizing polarity to orient guidance towards netrin in Development Cell (editorial rejected 12-17-2013) 0, 2013
Zheng Wang, Natasha S. Savage, Joshua W. Ziel, Qiuyi Chi, Kai Zhang, Elliott J. Hagedorn, David R. Sherwood

Awards

  • 2009 People & Ideas section feature of Journal of Cell Biology

  • 2007 Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences Award

  • 2007 Basil O'Connor Scholar Award, March of Dimes

  • 2007 Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences, Pew Charitable Trusts, The

  • 2006 American Cancer Society Research Scholar