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Graduate Opportunities 2012-2013 Archive

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Older listings: 2011-2012 | 2010-2011 | 2009-2010 | 2008-2009 | 2007-2008 | 2006-2007 | 2005-2006 | 2004-2005 | 2003-2004 | 2002-2003 | 2001-2002 | 2000-2001 | 1999-2000

titles marked (MS) are for students seeking a master's degree, (PhD) are for students seeking a doctoral degree,
not marked are for students seeking either master's or doctoral degrees

Assistantships and Fellowships | Fellowship Program Links | Short Courses | Summer Jobs

Featured Positions

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Location Title Closes Posted
Central Michigan University Diversity, genetics, and physiology of microorganisms that control biogeochemical cycles 5/31/13 1/8/13
Southern Illinois University Watershed Science and Policy (3 PhD positions) 5/1/13 4/2/13
University of Montana Beetle Kill and Bioenergy (PhD) 4/30/13 3/4/13
Macquarie University (Australia) Scaling functional traits to whole-plant growth (PhD) 4/7/13 3/1/13
Texas A&M University Ecology and management of grasslands, savannas, forests (PhD) 2/15/13 1/7/13

All Positions

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Location Title Closes Posted
University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center Citrus physiology, host-pathogen interactions (PhD) 9/15/13 6/28/13
University of Zürich (Switzerland) Biodiversity-effects on vegetation–atmosphere interactions (PhD) 9/15/13 6/26/13
Arizona State University Information theory and ecosystems (PhD) 8/30/13 5/28/13
University of Canterbury (New Zealand) Freshwater Ecology (PhD) 7/31/13 5/13/13
University of Western Australia Ecophysiology of a canker-affected eucalypt (PhD) 7/20/13 6/21/13
Memorial University (Canada) Impacts of climate change on boreal forest soil organic matter (PhD) 7/15/13 6/10/13
Texas State University Vegetation Dynamics (MS)  7/1/13 7/1/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Soil Science/Biogeochemistry 7/1/13 6/10/13
Memorial University (Canada) Mathematical modelling – aquatic parasite dynamics 7/1/13 6/5/13
Purdue University Aquatic Ecology 7/1/13 5/6/13
Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie (France) Conservation eco-physiology (PhD) 6/30/13 6/10/13
Michigan Technological University Temperate and tropical forest canopy response to climate change (MS) 6/30/13 6/10/13
Texas State University Population Biology and Ecological Speciation of Cynipid Gall Formers  6/28/13 6/28/13
Virginia Tech Forest Biogeochemistry and Hydrology (MS)  6/28/13 6/28/13
Stephen F. Austin State University Behavioral and sensory ecology of fishes (MS)  6/28/13 6/28/13
Utah State University Invasion ecology in Hawaii (MS)  6/28/13 6/28/13
Pennsylvania State University Movements and habitat use of snowshoe hare (MS)  6/21/13 6/21/13
Utah State University Forest/Fire Ecology (2 positions)  6/21/13 6/21/13
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen (Germany) Ecology of the Tree Rhizosphere (PhD) 6/17/13 6/3/13
INRA-University of Burgundy (France) Molecular analyses of denitrifier community ecology (PhD) 6/17/13 5/28/13
University of Auckland (New Zealand) Kauri Tree Drought Adaptations (PhD) 6/17/13 5/9/13
Oklahoma State University Restoration Ecology and Mycorrhizal Ecology (2 PhD positions) 6/15/13 4/25/13
Texas State University Small Mammal Metacommunity Ecology (MS) 6/15/13 4/5/13
University of Idaho Forest Ecology & Management (PhD)  6/11/13 6/11/13
University of Idaho Forest Operations Modeling (1 MS, 1 PhD)  6/10/13 6/10/13
University of Washington Methane oxidation around the roots of wetland plants (PhD)  6/10/13 6/10/13
University College London (UK) Natural Disasters and Development/Legal and Policy frameworks for Natural Resource Management (4 PhD) 6/7/13 5/29/13
University of Helsinki (Finland) Ecology and Evolution of Immune Defence in a Butterfly Metapopulation (PhD) 6/7/13 5/8/13
University of Alabama Urban Forestry Biometrics (MS)  6/4/13 6/4/13
Murray State University Bunchgrass dynamics/fire/plant diversity in longleaf pine savannas (MS) 6/1/13 4/29/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Forest Restoration (MS)  5/31/13 5/31/13
Station d’Ecologie Expérimentale de Moulis/University of Groningen (France/Netherlands) Theoretical ecology (PhD) 5/31/13 5/29/13
University of Zurich (Switzerland) Biodemography (PhD) 5/31/13 5/3/13
Central Michigan University Diversity, genetics, and physiology of microorganisms that control biogeochemical cycles 5/31/13 1/8/13
University of St Andrews/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (UK/Germany) Statistical Ecology, Great Apes (PhD)  5/30/13 5/30/13
University of South Dakota Aquatic Ecology  5/30/13 5/30/13
Washington State University Vancouver Aquatic Invasive Species 5/30/13 5/2/13
University of Western Sydney (Australia) Soil Microbial Ecology (2 PhD positions) 5/30/13 3/28/13
University of Alaska Fairbanks Riverine/Salmonid Ecology (PhD)  5/29/13 5/29/13
University of Georgia Forest Entomology (MS)  5/29/13 5/29/13
University of Maryland, Baltimore County Neotropical migratory bird ecology, Jamaica (PhD)  5/29/13 5/29/13
Utah State University Evaluating Ecosystem Services in Coupled Human-Natural Systems (PhD)  5/29/13 5/29/13
University of Arkansas Microbial Ecology/ Gut microbiome, health and diet (PhD)  5/29/13 5/29/13
Old Dominion University Migrant bird use of hardwood forest habitat (MS)  5/29/13 5/29/13
University of Texas-Brownsville Wildlife Ecology (MS)  5/29/13 5/29/13
Pennsylvania State University What limits and regulates animals in their natural world? (2 PhD positions)  5/29/13 5/29/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Climate-related tree dieback (position filled)  5/29/13 5/29/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Tree biology/land reclamation (MS)  5/29/13 5/29/13
South Dakota State University Stream Assessment and Monitoring (MS) 5/24/13 5/1/13
The Jena Experiment Functional Biodiversity Research (9 PhD positions) 5/20/13 5/7/13
University of Florida Ant diversity, population genetics, and citizen science (MS) 5/20/13 5/7/13
University of Leipzig (Germany) Plant Physiology/Biospectroscopy (PhD) 5/20/13 5/3/13
Southern Cross University (Australia) Marine Ecology (PhD) 5/20/13 3/8/13
University of California, Merced Paleoecology, biogeography, and global change (PhD) 5/17/13 5/3/13
South Dakota State University Climate warming and stream food web interactions (PhD) 5/17/13 4/25/13
University of Wisconsin-Madison Prairie grouse populations and environmental stressors (PhD) 5/17/13 4/23/13
University of Florida African wildlife research (PhD) 5/15/13 5/13/13
University of Illinois Foreclosure effects on residential landscapes 5/15/13 5/2/13
Wageningen University (the Netherlands) Avian Sexual Selection (PhD) 5/15/13 4/22/13
University of Illinois Mapping the spread of water hyacinth in a large river (MS) 5/15/13 5/1/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Adaptive traits related to growth performance in hybrid poplar clones (MS)  5/8/13 5/8/13
University of Northern Colorado Plant, mycorrhizal fungi, insect interactions (MS)  5/7/13 5/7/13
University of Arkansas, Monticello Modeling Stream Networks & GIS (MS)  5/6/13 5/6/13
St. Francis Xavier University (Canada) Factors Affecting Distribution of Invasive Tunicates (MS)  5/6/13 5/6/13
Texas Tech University Wetland Ecology (PhD)  5/3/13 5/3/13
Landcare Research (New Zealand) Plant ecology and diversification (PhD) 5/1/13 4/5/13
Southern Illinois University Watershed Science and Policy (3 PhD positions) 5/1/13 4/2/13
University of Waterloo (Canada) Plant morphology, microclimate and insect dynamics 5/1/13 3/26/13
University of Waterloo (Canada) Modelling ecosystem engineers 5/1/13 3/26/13
University of Florida Bat Ecology (MS) 5/1/13 3/15/13
Louisiana Tech University Effect of coppicing on photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism in cottonwood (MS)  4/30/13 4/30/13
University of Mainz (Germany) Parasite manipulation of host behavior (PhD) 4/30/13 4/17/13
University of Kent (UK) Human-wildlife interactions in urban environments (PhD, European/UK students only) 4/30/13 4/10/13
University of Montana Beetle Kill and Bioenergy (PhD) 4/30/13 3/4/13
North Carolina State University Ecology of mosquito vectors of disease (MS)  4/29/13 4/29/13
York University (Canada) Effects of permafrost thaw on carbon cycling in aquatic environments  4/26/13 4/26/13
King's College, London (UK) Remote Sensing (PhD, UK citizens only)  4/25/13 4/25/13
Antioch University New England Environmental Studies (MS)  4/23/13 4/23/13
University of Haifa Integrating Green Roofs and Photovoltaic Panels  4/22/13 4/22/13
Nova Southeastern University Remote Sensing, Global Reef Expedition (PhD)  4/22/13 4/22/13
Washington State University Vancouver Global Change and Watershed Biogeochemistry  4/19/13 4/19/13
Iowa State University Corn Insect Pest Ecology/Gene Flow  4/19/13 4/19/13
University of Illinois Biogeochemical impacts of hemlock loss in the southern Appalachians (MS)  4/17/13 4/17/13
Mississippi State University Habitat Suitability Assessment of Wild Turkeys (MS)  4/17/13 4/17/13
ETH Zurich (Switzerland) Forest Landscape Dynamics (PhD) 4/15/13 3/19/13
University of Wisconsin-Madison Remote Sensing of Ecosystem Functioning (PhD) 4/15/13 3/5/13
University of North Dakota Earth System Science and Policy (MS) 4/15/13 2/28/13
Pennsylvania State University, DuBois Mycorrhizae and oak regeneration dynamics (MS)  4/11/13 4/11/13
Swansea University (UK) Scaling-up relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (PhD) 4/11/13 2/20/13
The Jena Experiment (Germany) Biodiversity Research (6 PhD positions) 4/10/13 3/19/13
University of Glasgow (UK) Universal laws of mass migration: From cancer cells to wildebeest (PhD)  4/9/13 4/9/13
University of Illinois Floodplain Forest Restoration (MS)  4/9/13 4/9/13
Texas A&M University-Kingsville Plant biology/ecology, ecological modeling and ecoinformatics (MS)  4/9/13 4/9/13
Southern Illinois University Carbondale Thermoregulation, Thermal Sensitivity, and Stress Responses in Endotherms (MS)  4/8/13 4/8/13
Macquarie University (Australia) Scaling functional traits to whole-plant growth (PhD) 4/7/13 3/1/13
University of Western Sydney (Australia) Plant water use efficiency (PhD) 4/5/13 3/19/13
University of California, Riverside Paleolimnology and isotope biogeochemistry of Sierra Nevada lakes  4/4/13 4/4/13
University of Missouri Carbon Sequestration along an Urban to Wildland Gradient (PhD)  4/4/13 4/4/13
Chatham University Sustainability (MS)  4/4/13 4/4/13
Murray State University Stream Ecology (MS) 4/4/13 3/18/13
University of Maine Paleoecology and Biogeography (MS)  4/3/13 4/3/13
Texas Tech University Molecular mycorrhizal ecology of orchids  4/2/13 4/2/13
Stockholm University (Sweden) Insect life cycles – ecology, genetics and genomics (PhD) 4/2/13 3/22/13
Monash University (Australia) Spatial ecology of dynamic communities and the function of invaded landscapes (2 PhD) 4/2/13 3/7/13
University of Lethbridge (Canada) Cold and heat tolerance of the khapra beetle (MS) 4/1/13 2/18/13
SUNY-ESF Rabbit Parasitology and Nutrition (MS) 4/1/13 1/2/13
University of Goettingen (Germany) Forest Ecology (PhD) 3/31/13 3/15/13
Chinese Academy of Sciences Behavioral ecology, community ecology, conservation, birds  3/29/13 3/29/13
University of Queensland (Australia) Biodiversity Conservation, Ecosystem Services, Spatial Analysis (PhD) 3/29/13 2/7/13
University of Maine American Martens - sampling designs for population status (PhD) 3/27/13 3/14/13
University of Maine Forest trees and mammals (MS) 3/27/13 3/14/13
University of Alabama Everglades Carbon Dynamics (PhD)  3/26/13 3/26/13
University of Tasmania (Australia) Tasmanian devils and their contagious cancer (PhD)  3/25/13 3/25/13
Southern Illinois University Silviculture (MS)  3/22/13 3/22/13
Nicholls State University Marine and Environmental Biology (5 MS positions) 3/22/13 2/5/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Movement potential and impacts to endangered fishes (MS)  3/19/13 3/19/13
University of Wisconsin-Madison Avian Ecological Immunology (PhD) 3/18/13 2/14/13
California State University, Northridge Evolutionary Ecology (MS) 3/15/13 2/7/13
Montclair State University Soil Ecology (PhD) 3/15/13 2/5/13
WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF Biological Effects on Soil Stability (PhD) 3/15/13 2/5/13
Oakland University Stream, Riparian or Wetland Ecology (MS) 3/15/13 2/4/13
Towson University Invasive plant ecology (MS) 3/15/13 1/29/13
Florida Atlantic University Ecosystem and Fire Ecology of the Everglades (MS) 3/15/13 2/4/13
Northern Arizona University Plant-soil interactions under climate change (PhD) 3/15/13 12/3/12
Umeå University/Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Soil chemistry/biogeochemistry (2 PhD positions) 3/10/13 2/27/13
University of Wyoming Restoration Ecology (2 positions)  3/8/13 3/8/13
Cornell University Applied Ecology, Moose Populations in New York (MS) 3/8/13 2/14/13
Oklahoma State University Burying beetle ecology and behavior (PhD)  3/7/13 3/7/13
Louisiana State University Ecology and conservation biology of pine savannas (PhD)  3/7/13 3/7/13
University of British Columbia Okanagan Forest hydrology (2 PhD positions)  3/4/13 3/4/13
Sacred Heart University Environmental Systems Analysis & Management (MS)  3/4/13 3/4/13
Dartmouth College Ecological and socio-cultural implications of rapid environmental change (PhD) 3/1/13 2/5/13
University of Vermont Forest Climate Change Biogeochemistry (PhD) 3/1/13 2/4/13
University of Vermont Agricultural Climate Change Mitigation (MS) 3/1/13 2/4/13
University of Wisconsin-Madison Host plant resistance in cranberries (MS) 3/1/13 1/31/13
University of Nevada Reno Climate Research (6 PhD positions) 3/1/13 1/24/13
Purdue University Invasive Species (PhD) 3/1/13 12/20/12
Utrecht University (The Netherlands) Plant Ecophysiology (PhD) 3/1/13 11/28/12
Central Michigan University Aquatic/Marine Molecular Ecology (2 MS positions) 3/1/13 11/7/12
Mississippi State University Effects of biomass production on birds and plant communities (MS)  2/28/13 2/28/13
University of Nevada Reno Pollinator behavior 2/28/13 12/20/12
University of Montana Topographic influences on forest productivity (PhD)  2/27/13 2/27/13
Mississippi State University Fire Ecology (PhD)  2/27/13 2/27/13
University of Rhode Island Invasive species ecology/evolution (PhD)  2/27/13 2/27/13
Dalhousie University (Canada) Physiology and winter ecology of migratory birds and fish  2/27/13 2/27/13
Georgia Southern University Forest Ecophysiology (MS)  2/27/13 2/27/13
Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium Wetland biogeochemistry (MS)  2/26/13 2/26/13
Pennsylvania State University Sustainable dairy cropping systems  2/26/13 2/26/13
University of Technology, Sydney (Australia) Monitoring the health and survival of seagrass populations: developing molecular markers (PhD) 2/24/13 1/25/13
Michigan Technological University Adaptive Silviculture and Remote Sensing (PhD)  2/21/13 2/21/13
Mississippi State University Host Plant-Consumer Ecology (PhD)  2/20/13 2/20/13
Louisiana State University Graduate Assistant Herbarium Curatorship  2/20/13 2/20/13
Virginia Tech Forest Ecosystem Ecology and Global Change  2/19/13 2/19/13
Mississippi State University Stem Growth and Crown Dynamics in Pacific Northwest Forests (MS)  2/19/13 2/19/13
Oregon State University Insect Ecology  2/18/13 2/18/13
Virginia Tech Climate Change and Forest Carbon Dynamics  2/18/13 2/18/13
University of Maryland Spatial modeling/remote sensing of intraspecific variation in phenology (PhD) 2/18/13 1/10/13
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Integrated pest management and biological control 2/18/13 12/20/12
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Molecular Genetics/Plant Ecology (MS) 2/15/13 1/24/13
John Carroll University Amphibian Ecology (MS) 2/15/13 1/24/13
Kent State University Biogeochemistry and ecosystem ecology 2/15/13 1/24/13
Eastern Illinois University Migration strategies of songbirds (MS) 2/15/13 1/9/13
Texas A&M University Ecology and management of grasslands, savannas, forests (PhD) 2/15/13 1/7/13
University of Florida Interactions between insects, fungi, and microbes (PhD) 2/15/13 1/4/13
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Ecology and Management of Moose in Agricultural Landscapes (PhD) 2/15/13 11/9/12
Northern Illinois University Ecology, Evolution, Behavior, and Conservation 2/15/13 10/12/12
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Grassland restoration ecology (PhD) 2/10/13 1/3/13
University of Exeter, Cornwall (UK) Ecology and environmental science (MS)  2/8/13 2/8/13
Purdue University Biometry of Black Walnut Plantations  2/7/13 2/7/13
Durham University (UK) Management of savannah ecosystems for biodiversity/Climate impacts on terrestrial nomadic birds in Australia (2 PhD) 2/7/13 1/22/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Carbon cycling in agroforestry systems (MS)  2/5/13 2/5/13
University of Arkansas, Monticello Bioenergy Agroforest Belowground Production and Dynamics (MS)  2/5/13 2/5/13
Western University (Canada) Landscape Characters for Predicting Stream Benthic Communities (MS) 2/1/13 1/24/13
Western University (Canada) Ecological indicators for watershed monitoring (MS) 2/1/13 1/24/13
Pennsylvania State University Applied Population Ecology (2 positions) 2/1/13 1/24/12
Arizona State University/Minnesota State University Plant litter photodegradation in deserts (1 MS, 1 PhD) 2/1/13 1/22/13
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff Aquatic Ecology (MS) 2/1/13 1/3/13
Brigham Young University Plant Ecophysiology (PhD) 2/1/13 12/19/12
University of Wisconsin-Madison Molecular Mechanisms of Insecticide Resistance (PhD) 2/1/13 12/14/12
Ball State University Contaminants and nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems 2/1/13 12/13/12
University of North Dakota Master of Environmental Management 2/1/13 12/13/12
San Diego State University Coupled Natural/Human Systems Modeling (PhD) 2/1/13 11/13/12
Wright State University Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences (PhD) 2/1/13 11/5/12
Mississippi State University Population Dynamics of Wild Turkeys (PhD) 2/1/13 11/5/12
University of Maine Adaptation to Abrupt Climate Change (PhD) 2/1/13 10/19/12
University of Houston Evolutionary Biology and Ecology 2/1/13 10/10/12
University of Mississippi Soil Microbial & Forest Restoration Ecology (MS) 2/1/13 8/7/12
Western Washington University Biology  1/31/13 1/31/13
Minnesota State University Plant Litter Decomposition in the Sonoran Desert (MS)  1/31/13 1/31/13
University of Pittsburgh Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry (PhD) 1/31/13 1/4/13
Virginia Tech Avian Incubation Behavior (2 PhD positions) 1/31/13 11/1/12
Michigan State University Dynamics of White-tailed Deer Populations and Disease (PhD)  1/30/13 1/30/13
University of Arizona Ecohydrology and Socio-Ecological System Resilience  1/29/13 1/29/13
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry Demography and Population Genetics of Cottontail Rabbits (1 PhD, 1 MS)  1/29/13 1/29/13
Western Kentucky University Riverine Food Web Research (MS)  1/29/13 1/29/13
University of California, Riverside Isotope Biogeochemistry 1/28/13 1/22/13
Pennsylvania State University Management of eastern deciduous forests in the context of deer population management (PhD)  1/25/13 1/25/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Fire Science and Fire Ecology (PhD)  1/24/13 1/24/13
University of Waterloo (Canada) Environmental Psychology  1/24/13 1/24/13
Dartmouth College Intercontinental comparisons of the ecology and impacts of an invasive forest insect (PhD)  1/24/13 1/24/13
Algoma University (Canada) Plant and soil microbial ecology (PhD)  1/24/13 1/24/13
University of Missouri Urban Forest Carbon Sequestration (PhD)  1/22/13 1/22/13
Technische Universität München (Germany) Soil science - subsoil organic matter (PhD) 1/20/13 12/13/12
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research Biodiversity Research (6 PhD positions) 1/18/13 1/2/13
University of Edinburgh (UK) Disease Ecology (PhD) 1/18/13 11/20/12
Utah State University/University of Utah/Brigham Young University Water resources sustainability (4 PhD positions) 1/15/13 12/20/12
Boise State University Molecular Ecology of Grouse (MS) 1/15/13 12/17/12
Clemson University Behavioral and Physiological Ecology 1/15/13 12/14/12
Purdue University Natural resource sustainability and resilience 1/15/13 12/13/12
University of Idaho Natural Resources (MS) 1/15/13 12/13/12
Brookhaven National Laboratory/Stony Brook University Arctic Plant Ecophysiology (PhD) 1/15/13 12/12/12
Tulane University Avian systematics (PhD) 1/15/13 12/3/12
University of Alabama Aquatic Community Ecology (PhD) 1/15/13 11/19/12
University of Konstanz (Germany) Ecology and genomics of parallel speciation of cichlid fishes in Nicaragua (PhD) 1/15/13 11/16/12
University of Konstanz (Germany) Isotopic finger-printing of changes in copepod trophic position (PhD) 1/15/13 11/16/12
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Germany) Evolution of social behaviors in sparrows (PhD) 1/15/13 11/16/12
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Germany) Bird physiological and behavioral ecology, Tanzania (PhD) 1/15/13 11/16/12
Florida International University Urban ecology, avian ecology, conservation biology, tropical ecology (PhD) 1/15/13 11/14/12
University of New Hampshire Terrestrial ecosystem ecology (PhD) 1/15/13 11/2/12
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center Pre-doctoral Fellowships 1/15/13 10/26/12
Boise State University Sustainable Bioenergy - soil biogeochemistry/ecology (MS) 1/15/13 10/22/12
University of Alaska Fairbanks Boreal and Arctic Ecosystem Ecology/Biogeochemistry (2 positions) 1/15/13 10/17/12
Ohio University Deciduous Forest Ecology 1/15/13 9/27/12
Stony Brook University Ecology and Evolution 1/15/13 9/25/12
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Landscape Level Plant-Climate Interactions or Remote Sensing 1/13/13 11/20/12
University of Alberta (Canada) Forest soils-plant nutrition (3 MS/PhD positions)  1/11/13 1/11/13
Washington State University Vancouver Mathematical Biology (PhD) 1/10/13 12/11/12
Washington State University Vancouver Aquatic Ecology 1/10/13 11/30/12
Texas Tech University Eavesdropping of mating signals by frog-biting midges 1/10/13 11/14/12
Rice University Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 1/10/13 11/8/12
Washington State University Vancouver Biology and Environmental Science 1/10/13 10/19/12
National University of Singapore Modelling of tropical forest dynamics (PhD)  1/9/13 1/9/13
Utah State University Applied entomology and insect pathology  1/8/13 1/8/13
Durham University (UK) Face files as vectors of bovine tuberculosis? (PhD)  1/7/13 1/7/13
George Mason University/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Conservation Biology (PhD) 1/7/13 11/1/12
Case Western Reserve University Plant Ecology 1/7/13 8/2/12
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Germany) Evolutionary Genomics and Environmental Change (4 PhD positions) 1/6/13 11/29/12
Oregon State University Earth System Modeling and forest die-off thresholds (PhD) 1/5/13 12/3/12
Purdue University Wildlife Ecology (PhD) 1/5/13 11/13/12
Western Kentucky University Ecological Morphology (MS)  1/4/13 1/4/13
University of Alberta (Canada) Conservation Biology, stream crossings and fish (MS)  1/3/13 1/3/13
University of Alaska Fairbanks Riverine Food Webs and Fish Ecology (4 MS/PhD positions)  1/2/13 1/2/13
Mississippi State University Effects of biomass production on birds and plant communities (PhD)  1/2/13 1/2/13
George Washington University Saprotrophic fungal community structure/function (PhD) 1/2/13 12/3/12
Northern Arizona University Mycorrhizal Ecology (PhD) 1/1/13 11/2/12
University of South Florida Ecology and Evolution, Environmental and Ecological Microbiology, or Physiology and Morphology 1/1/13 10/29/12
University of California, Irvine Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 1/1/13 10/24/12
University of California, Irvine Tri-trophic interactions 1/1/13 10/19/12
Syracuse University Plant Evolutionary Biology (MS/PhD) 12/31/12 11/26/12
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Wildlife Ecotoxicology (1 PhD and 2 MS positions) 12/31/12 11/20/12
University of Wisconsin-Madison Triploidy and the Physiological/Chemical Ecology of Aspen (PhD) 12/31/12 11/15/12
Virginia Tech Evolution of complex phenotypes in herps (PhD) 12/31/12 10/31/12
Northwestern University/Chicago Botanic Garden Plant Biology and Conservation 12/31/12 10/10/12
Virginia Tech Integrative Organismal Biology (PhD) 12/31/12 10/5/12
University of Montana Ecosystem Biogeochemistry 12/31/12 9/20/12
Texas A&M University West Nile virus transmission ecology (PhD) 12/21/12 12/10/12
University of Cape Town (South Africa) Martial Eagle Conservation Research (PhD) 12/21/12 12/3/12
University of Colorado Landscape analysis/modeling, Land use/land cover change (2 positions)  12/20/12 12/20/12
Wilfrid Laurier University (Canada) Forest Ecology (2 positions)  12/20/12 12/20/12
SUNY-ESF Beaver impacts across the northern forest (PhD) 12/20/12 11/19/12
Northern Arizona University Quantitative Forest Ecology (MS)  12/17/12 12/17/12
Northern Arizona University Ecological Restoration of Mixed-conifer Forests (MS)  12/17/12 12/17/12
Northern Arizona University Restoration Ecology and Mixed-conifer Forest Dynamics (MS)  12/17/12 12/17/12
Umeå University (Sweden) Effects of reindeer grazing in arctic ecosystem (PhD) 12/17/12 12/11/12
San Diego State University Golden Monkey habitat use and links to human activities (PhD) 12/15/12 12/3/12
Arizona State University Physiological or Evolutionary Ecology 12/15/12 11/13/12
Portland State University Aquatic Ecology (PhD) 12/15/12 11/9/12
University of Idaho Conservation Policies, Land Use Change and Ecosystem Services in Central America (2 PhD positions) 12/15/12 11/1/12
University of North Carolina at Charlotte Remote Sensing and Forest Landscape Modeling (PhD)  12/14/12 12/14/12
Michigan State University Early Detection of Forest Health Threats (MS) 12/14/12 11/30/12
Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany) Ecological Modeling (PhD)  12/13/12 12/13/12
Northeastern University Marine ecology (PhD)  12/13/12 12/13/12
San Francisco State University Salamander behavior and disease ecology (2 MS positions)  12/12/12 12/12/12
University of Western Australia Mineral nutrition of Australian Proteaceae (PhD)  12/11/12 12/11/12
Louisiana State University Spatial Analysis of Extreme Hydroclimatology Events (PhD)  12/11/12 12/11/12
University of Manchester (UK) Modelling the evolution of sexual imprinting behaviour (PhD) 12/7/12 10/30/12
University of Florida Fungal Ecology (PhD) 12/7/12 10/19/12
University of Toronto (Canada) Population Dynamics and Conservation  12/3/12 12/3/12
Colorado State University Restoration Ecology, oil sands region of Alberta (PhD)  12/3/12 12/3/12
University of Idaho Modeling forest disturbances (PhD)  12/3/12 12/3/12
Carleton University (Canada) Quantitative Fish Spatial Ecology  12/3/12 12/3/12
University of New Hampshire Soil Biogeochemistry  12/3/12 12/3/12
University of Maryland, Baltimore County Geography and Environmental Systems  12/3/12 12/3/12
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Consequences of hemlock decline for biogeochemical cycling  12/3/12 12/3/12
Memorial University (Canada) Theoretical Ecology/Epidemiology (MS) 12/3/12 11/29/12
University of Southern California Island fox evolution (PhD) 12/1/12 11/29/12
Utah State University Savanna/Rangeland Ecology in Kenya (PhD) 12/1/12 11/12/12
University of California, Berkeley Arthropod Biodiversity (several PhD positions) 12/1/12 11/8/12
Florida International University Ecology, Florida Coastal Everglades LTER (3 PhD positions) 12/1/12 11/7/12
Utah State University Global ecology, community ecology, or ecological theory/modeling 12/1/12 11/6/12
Utah State University Black bear behavior, demography, and population dynamics (PhD) 12/1/12 10/30/12
University of Alabama Aquatic Community Ecology (MS) 12/1/12 10/23/12
University of Colorado Aquatic Ecology (2 MS/PhD positions) 12/1/12 10/15/12
Ohio State University River-Riparian Food Webs and Stream Fish Conservation 12/1/12 10/11/12
University of Oklahoma Land Use Effects on Water Quality using Remote Sensing (PhD) 12/1/12 10/11/12
Dartmouth College Pollination Ecology (PhD) 12/1/12 10/2/12
Dartmouth College Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (PhD) 12/1/12 10/2/12
Ohio State University Watershed Hydrology 12/1/12 9/26/12
Indiana University Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology (PhD) 12/1/12 9/10/12
University of British Columbia (Canada) Terrestrial Ecosystem Research 12/1/12 6/27/12
Colorado State University Evolutionary ecology of Song Sparrows, California Channel Islands (PhD)  11/30/12 11/30/12
Michigan State University Fire ecology and forest soil black carbon (PhD)  11/30/12 11/30/12
University of Copenhagen (Denmark) Phylogeography, Extinctions and Global Climate Change (PhD) 11/30/12 10/18/12
University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands) Environmental Studies (5 PhD positions) 11/23/12 11/16/12
Portland State University Landscape genetics of plants  11/20/12 11/20/12
SUNY-ESF Ecosystem Ecology and Uncertainty Analysis  11/20/12 11/20/12
Clemson University Disturbance Impacts on Forest Ecosystems (PhD)  11/20/12 11/20/12
Stockholm University (Sweden) Plant Evolutionary Ecology (PhD) 11/20/12 10/18/12
Michigan Technological University Biodiversity and Soil Carbon Dynamics of Bioenergy Crops (2 PhD positions) 11/20/12 10/12/12
Iowa State University Theoretical ecology  11/19/12 11/19/12
Michigan Technological University Ph.D. position for returned Peace Corp Volunteer  11/19/12 11/19/12
Clemson University Population ecology of Carolina bogmint 11/19/12 11/9/12
University of Texas Marine Science Institute Population biology of toxic algae (PhD)  11/16/12 11/16/12
Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany) Plant Invasion Ecology (PhD) 11/16/12 11/1/12
Purdue University Hardwood Trees/Plant-insect interactions 11/16/12 10/12/12
Pennsylvania State University Forest Ecology (MS) 11/16/12 9/25/12
University of Twente (The Netherlands) Socio-Environmental Modeling (PhD) 11/15/12 11/12/12
University of Georgia Alligator Harvest Management (PhD) 11/15/12 10/19/12
University of Regina (Canada) Plant Ecology 11/15/12 10/12/12
Michigan State University Ecology and evolution of tropical and temperate trees (PhD)  11/14/12 11/14/12
Plymouth State University Watershed Ecosystem Services (MS)  11/14/12 11/14/12
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Grassland restoration ecology and invasive plants (PhD)  11/13/12 11/13/12
University of Alaska Anchorage Arctic Tundra Ecology (MS) 11/10/12 10/22/12
University of Georgia Ecosystem Biogeochemistry (PhD)  11/8/12 11/8/12
WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF (Switzerland) Climate change effects on high-alpine flora (PhD)  11/8/12 11/8/12
Utah State University Plant Population and Community Ecology (PhD)  11/6/12 11/6/12
North Carolina State University Insect Ecology and Integrated Pest Management (PhD)  11/5/12 11/5/12
University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras Natural-Human Systems in the Urbanizing Tropics (PhD)  11/5/12 11/5/12
University of Maine Forest soils and ecosystem biogeochemistry (2 positions)  11/5/12 11/5/12
Montana State University Disease Ecology and Management of Cereal Viruses (PhD)  11/1/12 11/1/12
University of Zurich (Switzerland) Giant tortoises and seed dispersal (PhD) 11/1/12 10/2/12
East Carolina University Ecological Physiology, Development, Behavior  10/30/12 10/30/12
North Carolina State University Sustainable agriculture and soil arthropod ecology  10/30/12 10/30/12
University of New Hampshire Water and Bioenergy Crops in the Americas (PhD) 10/30/12 10/4/12
Université du Québec à Rimouski Forest Ecology Modeling (PhD)  10/29/12 10/29/12
University of Illinois at Springfield Endangered Mammal Conservation and Recovery (MS)  10/29/12 10/29/12
Michigan State University Systems Integration and Sustainability  10/26/12 10/26/12
Utah State University Environment and Society, Watershed Sciences, and Wildland Resources (3 PhD positions)  10/26/12 10/26/12
University of North Dakota Landscape Ecology of Sheyenne National Grassland  10/25/12 10/25/12
University of Missouri Carbon and Climate Mitigation by Urban Forests (PhD)  10/23/12 10/23/12
University of North Dakota Earth System Science and Policy  10/23/12 10/23/12
University of Massachusetts Residential Outdoor Water Conservation (PhD)  10/23/12 10/23/12
East Carolina University Ecology and Evolution  10/23/12 10/23/12
Idaho State University Plant Physiological Ecology/Ecohydrology of Sagebrush Steppe Vegetation (MS)  10/23/12 10/23/12
University of Mississippi Mycorrhizal Ecology  10/22/12 10/22/12
Mississippi State University Plant ecology, evolution, and/or systematics (3 positions)  10/22/12 10/22/12
University of Arizona Grassland Birds 10/22/12 9/14/12
Louisiana State University Watershed Sciences (PhD)  10/19/12 10/19/12
Rice University Community/Population Ecology (PhD)  10/19/12 10/19/12
University of New Mexico Ecology and evolution of plants and plant-animal interactions (PhD)  10/18/12 10/18/12
University of Georgia Integrative Conservation (PhD)  10/17/12 10/17/12
University of Ghent/University of Groningen (Belgium/Netherlands) Eco-evolutionary dynamics in a spatial context (PhD) 10/17/12 9/14/12
Washington State University Insect/Landscape Ecology, Plant-Insect Interactions  10/16/12 10/16/12
North Dakota State University Insect ecology in agroecosystems  10/15/12 10/15/12
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Ecohydrology and Biogeochemistry (2 MS/PhD positions)  10/15/12 10/15/12
University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (7 MS, 5 PhD positions) 10/15/12 9/10/12
Universität Bern (Switzerland) Local Adaptation in Trees (PhD) 10/15/12 9/10/12
Montana State University Population Ecology, Chiricahua Leopard Frog (MS) 10/15/12 9/10/12
University of New Hampshire Remote Sensing and Coupled Natural and Human Systems (PhD)  10/12/12 10/12/12
University of Nevada Reno Kangaroo Mouse Habitat Associations and Population Dynamics (MS) 10/12/12 9/25/12
Michigan Technological University Plant Evolutionary Ecology (MS)  10/11/12 10/11/12
University of Nevada Reno Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology (PhD)  10/11/12 10/11/12
University of Hawaii Manoa Fungal Ecology and Evolution  10/10/12 10/10/12
Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Ecology (Germany) Influence of plant genetic traits on insect biodiversity (PhD)  10/10/12 10/10/12
University of Queensland (Australia) Industrial Ecology, Life Cycle Assessment and Systems Sustainability  10/10/12 10/10/12
University of Alabama Carbon Dynamics Modeling (MS)  10/10/12 10/10/12
University of Alabama Statistical Analysis of Urban Forest Data (MS)  10/10/12 10/10/12
University of Alabama Winter Arctic Plant Physiology (MS)  10/10/12 10/10/12
Baylor University Microbial Ecology (PhD)  10/10/12 10/10/12
Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Ecology (Germany) Modelling Resource Use in Reef Ecosystems (PhD) 10/10/12 9/18/12
Colorado State University Restoration Ecology, Oil Sands, Alberta (PhD)  10/8/12 10/8/12
University of New Hampshire Aquatic ecosystem responses to land use change (PhD)  10/8/12 10/8/12
University of Texas at Arlington Invertebrate or Fish Macroecology (MS)  10/8/12 10/8/12
University of Georgia Freshwater Connectivity (MS)  10/8/12 10/8/12
Griffith University (Australia) Disease Ecology, Fruit Bats (PhD) 10/8/12 9/10/12
Clark University Earth System Science (PhD)  10/5/12 10/5/12
ETH Zurich (Switzerland) Transport of fluids in trees (PhD)  10/5/12 10/5/12
University of Alaska Anchorage Physiological Ecology of trees at the Arctic treeline (MS) (position filled)  10/4/12 10/4/12
Auburn University Terrestrial ecosystem/Land surface modeling and applications (2-3 PhD positions)  10/4/12 10/4/12
Aarhus University (Denmark) Plant Macroecology and Phyloinformatics (2 PhD positions)  10/3/12 10/3/12
University of Hawaii Manoa Fungal Ecology  10/2/12 10/2/12
Stony Brook University Antarctic seabird ecology (PhD)  10/2/12 10/2/12
Columbia University Climate variability and tropical forest dynamics (PhD)  10/1/12 10/1/12
Florida Atlantic University Ecosystem Carbon Cycling of the Everglades (MS) 10/1/12 9/25/12
Iowa State University Sustainable Agriculture 10/1/12 8/15/12
University of Wisconsin-Madison Terrestrial Food Web Ecology (PhD) 10/1/12 7/17/12
University of Konstanz (Germany) Plant Ecology (PhD) 9/30/12 8/24/12
Clemson University Coastal marsh birds and climate change (MS)  9/27/12 9/27/12
University of Florida Wildlife Ecology and Conservation  9/27/12 9/27/12
University of Texas-Brownsville Coastal prairie and Tamaulipan thornscrub restoration (MS)  9/27/12 9/27/12
Utah State University Shrubland ecology (MS)  9/27/12 9/27/12
University of Texas-Brownsville Fire, Larch Trees, and C Dynamics in Siberia (MS)  9/25/12 9/25/12
Virginia Tech Microbial Ecology (PhD)  9/25/12 9/25/12
University of Wyoming Restoration Ecology (PhD)  9/25/12 9/25/12
University of Georgia Butterfly/pollinator ecology and behavior (PhD)  9/25/12 9/25/12
Texas Tech University Vegetation and Large Mammal Responses to Forest Restoration  9/24/12 9/24/12
Texas Tech University Orchid mycorrhizal ecology (MS)  9/24/12 9/24/12
University of Tennessee Sustainable crop production (PhD)  9/24/12 9/24/12
San Diego State University GIScience, landscape ecology, and human socioeconomics (PhD and MS)  9/25/12 9/25/12
University of Manitoba (Canada) Insect Ecology (2 positions)  9/20/12 9/20/12
Vancouver Island University Shellfish Ecology  9/18/12 9/18/12
Colorado State University Wildlife Ecology (PhD)  9/14/12 9/14/12
East Carolina University Population and community ecology  9/14/12 9/14/12
University of Louisiana at Lafayette Wetland ecosystems and plant community dynamics (PhD)  9/14/12 9/14/12
Montana State University Plant-Insect Interactions (PhD)  9/14/12 9/14/12
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Invasive Species and Prescribed Fire Effects on Plant Recruitment and Carbon Cycling (PhD)  9/14/12 9/14/12
San Diego State University Golden monkey habitat analysis/ecology/remote sensing (PhD)  9/10/12 9/10/12
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Estuarine & Coastal Phytoplankton Ecology (PhD)  9/10/12 9/10/12
Mississippi State University Forestry - Consequences of Fuels Treatments (2 MS positions)  9/10/12 9/10/12
University of Kansas Patterns of forest succession (MS)  9/7/12 9/7/12
University of Kansas Ecosystem Ecology (2 PhD positions)  9/7/12 9/7/12
South Dakota State University Wetland or Soil Ecosystems (MS)  9/6/12 9/6/12
University of Minnesota Forest Ecology (MS)  9/6/12 9/6/12
University of Idaho Wildlife Ecology (PhD)  9/6/12 9/6/12
University of Missouri Genetic Assessment of Amphibian Source-Sink Dynamics (PhD)  9/6/12 9/6/12
Iowa State University Agroecosystem Ecology and Management  9/6/12 9/6/12
University of Florida Citrus Physiology (PhD)  9/6/12 9/6/12
University of Hong Kong Larval Amphibian Ecology (PhD) 9/5/12 8/9/12
University of Rhode Island Turtle Ecology and Conservation (PhD) 9/5/12 8/7/12
University of Idaho Carbon Cycle impacts of Using Forest Harvest Residues for Bioenergy (PhD) 9/1/12 8/13/12
University of Idaho Silviculture 9/1/12 8/13/12
Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands) Animal Ecophysiology/Population Dynamics of Aquatic Ectotherms (2 PhD positions) 8/31/12 8/15/12
Auburn University Riparian Soils and Vegetation (MS)  8/29/12 8/29/12
Texas Tech University Natural Resources Management  8/28/12 8/28/12
Michigan Technological University Plant Evolutionary Ecology  8/28/12 8/28/12
University of Louisiana Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (PhD)  8/21/12 8/21/12
North Carolina State University Medical Entomology, Mosquitoes (MS)  8/21/12 8/21/12
Auburn University Plant Pathology/Climate Change (MS)  8/16/12 8/16/12
University of Virginia Population or Landscape Ecology of Insects  8/15/12 8/15/12
University of Idaho Sustainable Forest Bioenergy - nutrient cycling, fungal diversity, and invertebrate diversity (3 PhD positions) 8/15/12 8/2/12
North Carolina State University Genetic Engineering and Society (5-6 PhD positions)  8/13/12 8/13/12
University of Haifa (Israel) Mosquito Ecology/Community Ecology (PhD)  8/13/12 8/13/12
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Global change and biotic interactions in grasslands (PhD) 8/13/12 7/9/12
University of Wyoming Climate Change Ecology  8/9/12 8/9/12
Oregon State University Forest Soils  8/9/12 8/9/12
Texas A&M University Quantitative Population Biology (PhD)  8/7/12 8/7/12
Montana State University Agroecology (4 PhD positions)  8/7/12 8/7/12
University of Oklahoma Ecosystem Modeling/Carbon Cycle/Data Synthesis (2 positions)  8/7/12 8/7/12
University of Maryland Growing season length changes and productivity of forest trees (PhD)  8/2/12 8/2/12
Simon Fraser University (Canada) Pollination Ecology  8/2/12 8/2/12
University of Maryland Wetland-Stream Connectivity  8/2/12 8/2/12
Purdue University Using isotopes to trace nutrient use efficiency (PhD)  8/1/12 8/1/12
Old Dominion University Root Imaging with Ground-Penetrating Radar  8/1/12 8/1/12
Ben-Gurion University (Israel) Community ecology and foraging ecology (PhD) 7/30/12 7/13/12
University of Calgary (Canada) Pop/Commun/Evol Ecology  7/25/12 7/25/12
University of Guelph (Canada) Conservation Biology (MS)  7/24/12 7/24/12
University of Idaho Arctic Ecology and Remote Sensing (PhD)  7/24/12 7/24/12
Ryerson University (Canada) Plant Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Biology  7/23/12 7/23/12
Louisiana State University Hydrology/Hydrogeomorphology (PhD)  7/23/12 7/23/12
Clemson University Alligator Ecology (PhD)  7/23/12 7/23/12
Michigan Technological University Remote Sensing and Climate Sensitive Forest Growth Modeling (PhD)  7/19/12 7/19/12
Freie Universität Berlin (Germany) Plant defence against herbivores (2 PhD positions) 7/19/12 7/11/12
University of Maryland Global ecology and carbon dynamics  7/18/12 7/18/12
Centre Tecnològic Forestal de Catalunya (Spain) Impacts of climate and land use changes on fire regimes and biodiversity (PhD)  7/17/12 7/17/12
Louisiana State University Crayfish phyisology (MS)  7/13/12 7/13/12
University of Maryland Interdisciplinary Stormwater Modeling (PhD)  7/13/12 7/13/12
University of Maryland Mosquito Ecology (PhD)  7/13/12 7/13/12
University of Guelph (Canada) Modeling coupled human-environment forest-grassland ecosystems (PhD)  7/11/12 7/11/12
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Applied Plant Ecology (MS)  7/6/12 7/6/12
Colorado State University Trophic and hydrologic controls on willow communities (PhD)  7/6/12 7/6/12

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Assistantship and Fellowships:

Aarhus University: Two postdoc and two PhD positions in the Ecoinformatics & Biodiversity Group, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Denmark. I: One 2-year postdoc and one PhD position in the ERC StG project “Macroecological studies of long-term historical constraints on functional diversity and ecosystem functioning across continents (HISTFUNC)”. The postdoc project concerns long-term historical constraints on global and regional patterns in functional diversity of vascular plants, while the PhD project addresses the same topic specifically for the palms (a key-stone plant group in tropical ecosystems) and also looks into the interplay of palms with mammal functional diversity. II: One 2-year postdoc and one PhD position in the Danish “NSF” (FNU) project “Paleoclimatic stability and the evolutionary ecosystem ecology of Earth’s forests (STABFOR)”. The postdoc project concerns paleoclimatic stability effects on evolutionary dynamics of forest tree lineages, while the PhD project concerns phylogenetic and functional community structure in forest trees. All postdoc candidates are expected to provide cutting-edge expertise in advanced statistical analyses of large data sets (including strong skills in R), to have solid ecological background and strong collaborative skills, and to have proven abilities to publish at a high international level. STABFOR postdoc candidates should also have solid experience with phylogenetic analyses. All PhD candidates should have good abilities – for their career stage - in statistical modeling and ecology. Experience in plant ecology or botany would also be an advantage for all four positions. The main supervisor is prof. Jens-Christian Svenning. The projects also involve prof. Brian J. Enquist (University of Arizona), prof. Robert E. Ricklefs (University of Missouri), assistant prof. Brody Sandel (AU), and Head of Collections and Director of the Herbarium Finn Borchsenius (AU). All four positions should ideally start January 1st 2013. For further information, please contact: Professor Jens-Christian Svenning, svenning@biology.au.dk. The official announcements will soon come up here: Postdocs | PhD positions Further information for internationals. Posted: 10/3/12.

Algoma University: Drs. Pedro Antunes and Brandon Schamp at Algoma University, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada) are looking for a motivated Ph.D. student, available either in May or Sept. 2013. This position may radiate from the general themes of the two labs, relating to understanding species coexistence and abundance patterns within natural communities. The student will focus on plant and soil microbial systems, with specific focus to be developed by the student. Applicants would benefit from having: • a M.Sc. in plant or soil microbial ecology • basic plant taxonomy skills • knowledge of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal biology • knowledge of experimental design and statistics • experience in setting up greenhouse and/or field experiments • expertise in PCR based techniques • excellent oral communication skills and a proven publication record • the capacity to work independently and in a team. The Antunes and Schamp labs are located in the new state-of-the-art ESSAR Biosciences and Technology Convergence Centre. In addition to plant growth facilities, the labs are fully equipped for techniques in microbiology, including PCR-based techniques. Exceptional greenhouse facilities and a long-term field research site are available close by. Please contact Dr. Pedro M. Antunes (pantunes@gmail.com) and Dr. Brandon Schamp (Brandon.schamp@algomau.ca) for additional information about the position or send your C.V., a cover letter with a statement of research interests and the names of three individuals able to provide a recommendation letter. Posted: 1/24/13.

Antioch University New England: We still have a few openings for Fall 2013 for students interested in an MSc in Environmental Studies at Antioch in southern New Hampshire. We are committed to educating visionary, pragmatic leaders in a collaborative interdisciplinary setting founded on academic excellence and the principles of environmental justice and sustainability. We have several academic options at the master's and PhD level, with current openings in Conservation Biology, Sustainable Development and Climate Change, and Resource Management at MSc level. Our faculty are working around the globe from New England to Alaska, the tropics from Nicaragua to east Africa, and eastern Europe. in forest dynamics, climate change , physical geography and land use history, tropical forest ecology, seed dispersal ecology, primate ecology and conservation, protected areas management, and coastal and wetland ecology. Coursework includes field study courses and internships. Our students bring a range of professional experience and diversity to the classroom. Our delivery model is geared towards accommodating the working professional. Visit http://www.antiochne.edu/profiledepartments/environmental-studies/ to learn about the kinds of students who come to our programs. Antioch University New England is committed to innovative academic excellence, integrating practice with theory in a collaborative learning environment that is attentive to multiple learning styles. Antioch University New England believes in ecological stewardship and social justice, cultivating local as well as global perspectives to educate students with diverse backgrounds and opinions to become leaders of change. Posted: 4/23/13.

Arizona State University's College of Technology and Innovation, in partnership with the ASU Global Institute of Sustainability and the USA National Phenology Network, seek outstanding applicants for a Postdoctoral Scholar or Ph.D. level Graduate Research Assistant position based at ASU's Tempe, Arizona campus. The position supports theoretical complex land surface ecosystem, ecohydrology, and climate system research funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. Applicants will require strong mathematical, programming, and quantitative skills, with interests including ecosystems, phenology, eddy-covariance flux towers, watersheds, climate, and complex systems, and the curiosity and dedication necessary to pursue theoretical research in this context. Interests in information theory research are particularly sought. Ph.D. student applicants must be accepted by a related Ph.D. program at ASU, for example the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, the School of Earth and Space Exploration, or the School of Sustainability. Postdoctoral applicants should communicate a CV. Please submit a letter detailing your interest and your application package to Dr. Benjamin Ruddell, via email to bruddell (at) asu.edu. Applications will be accepted through August 30, 2013. The position will begin on January 1st, 2014, or as negotiated. Posted: 5/28/13.

Arizona State University: Michael Angilletta seeks graduate students with a general interest in physiological or evolutionary ecology and a specific interest in thermoregulatory behavior, thermal physiology, or mechanistic niche modeling. A strong record of academic performance is required and research experience is preferred. Both research and teaching fellowships are available to support exceptional applicants. For more information about the lab, visit www.ThermalAdaptation.com. General information about School of Life Sciences graduate programs. The deadline for formal applications to the School of Life Sciences is December 15th, 2012. Before submitting a formal application, please send a curriculum vitae, a brief statement of research interests, and a list of three academic references to Dr. Angilletta at angilletta@asu.edu. Posted: 11/13/12.

Arizona State University/Minnesota State University: Graduate Research Assistants & Technician studying plant litter photodegradation in deserts. Seeking to fill 2 graduate research assistantships (GRA – PhD & MS) and 1 technician position to study the drivers of plant litter decomposition in deserts, with particular emphasis on solar photodegradation. Incumbents will be part of a collaborative NSF-funded research team working with plant and microbial ecologists at Arizona State University and Minnesota State University. 1) One PhD GRA and one technician position are available in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University to study the mechanisms driving plant litter decomposition in the Sonoran Desert. Potential areas of investigation include quantifying the significance of photodegradation as a driver of litter decomposition, or investigating how leaf litter optical and anatomical characteristics influence the effectiveness of photodegradation. Applicants for both positions should have prior research experience, preferably a MS, be able to conduct field research during summer (hot) conditions in the Sonoran Desert, have excellent analytical, quantitative and writing skills, and be able to work both independently and as a member of a diverse research team. The technician will be responsible for maintaining field and laboratory experiments, organizing and analyzing large data sets, and managing undergraduate student research assistants, and will have the opportunity to conduct their own individual research projects. Contact: Dr. Thomas A. Day (tadday@asu.edu). 2) One MS GRA is available in the Department of Biological Sciences at Minnesota State University to study the mechanisms driving plant litter decomposition in the Sonoran Desert. Potential areas of investigation include determining what chemical attributes of plant litter favor solar photodegradation and how litter chemistry changes with photodegradation. Applicants should have prior research experience, excellent analytical and quantitative skills, the ability to analyze and organize large data sets, and be interested in plant chemical analyses. They may also be required to travel to Arizona for occasional field and laboratory work, and must be able to work both independently and as a member of a diverse research team. Contact: Dr. Christopher T. Ruhland (christopher.ruhland@mnsu.edu). To apply, send cover letter, CV, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores (except Technician applicants), and the names and contact information of 3 references to the appropriate person listed above, via email. Positions begin May or August 2013. Applications received before February 1 will receive full consideration. Posted: 1/22/13.

Auburn University: 2-3 PhD Graduate Assistantships in Terrestrial ecosystem/Land surface modeling and applications. We invite highly motivated graduate students to join the Ecosystem Dynamics and Global Ecology (EDGE) Laboratory at Auburn University for investigating cutting-edge research in the field of terrestrial ecosystem/land surface modeling and analysis. We use a systems approach (a combination of ecosystem modeling and ground/satellite observations) to examine biogeochemical and hydrological cycles, GHG emissions (CO2, CH4 and N2O), land-atmosphere interactions, or terrestrial-coastal coupling at multiple scales from watershed, regional, continental to global in the context of multifactor global change. Each graduate student can work on one or two of these research areas by developing and applying terrestrial ecosystem/Land surface models (If interested, please see some sample publications by our graduate students). Successful applicants will be supported by multiple projects funded by NASA, NSF, USDA and the University. We expect that these new graduate students will join us in Spring or Fall 2013. The applicants should possess a degree in ecology/biology, hydrology, meteorology, geography, earth system science, forestry, agronomy, or soil science. Skills in computer programming, statistics, GIS and remote sensing are desired, but not required. Interested applicants should send a cover letter outlining their qualifications, resume, and copies of transcripts, TOFEL, GRE scores, and contact information for three references to Dr. Hanqin Tian at Email: tianhan@auburn.edu. Posted: 10/4/12.

Auburn University: M.S. Position Available, Summer 2013 -Riparian Soils and Vegetation. We are looking for a motivated graduate student (M.S.) to work on an interdisciplinary project with the Auburn University Department of Agronomy and Soils, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, and Biology Department. This is part of a larger EPA funded project describing riparian and stream conditions in the Appalachian Plateau. Project involves fieldwork and some lab work. Ideal candidates will have knowledge of riparian vegetation in the southeast and basic knowledge of soils. Interested applicants should send to Dr. Eve Brantley ( brantef@auburn.edu ) a copy of their CV or resume, GPA and GRE scores, a written statement of graduate research interests, and contact information for two references. Posted: 8/29/12.

Auburn University: The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences currently has a graduate assistantship (M.S. $15,540) available in Plant Pathology/Climate Change research. Assistantships include tuition and fee waivers as well as shared funding of health insurance. The starting date for this position is negotiable, but January 1, 2013 desired. As part of a larger research project the student will examine the relationship of future climate scenarios of elevated tropospheric ozone and altered rainfall amounts with a plant pathogen in altering susceptibility to loblolly pine decline an important disease complex in the Southern United States. Minimum qualifications include a B.S. degree in Forestry, Plant Pathology, Horticulture, Plant Biology, or a related field, and an interest in plant pathology and or climate change. Additional information is available by contacting Dr. Arthur H. Chappelka (chappah@auburn.edu) or Dr. Lori Eckhardt (eckhalg@auburn.edu) in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University. Application process. Interested students should send a letter of interest, resume, transcripts (photocopy is acceptable), and GRE scores if available (photocopy is acceptable) to Dr. A.H. Chappelka or Dr. Lori Eckhardt, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, 602 Duncan Drive, Auburn, AL 36849-5418. Posted: 8/16/12.

Ball State University: MS and PhD positions are available in the Department of Biology at Ball State, Muncie, Indiana. Students would join collaborative research projects studying emerging contaminants and nutrient cycling dynamics in aquatic ecosystems in conjunction with ongoing research in the laboratory of Dr. Melody Bernot. PhD students would join the interdisciplinary environmental sciences PhD program. Graduate assistantships are available beginning May or August 2013. Interested students should contact Melody Bernot (mjbernot@bsu.edu) for additional information and to discuss individual research interests. Students should apply to the Graduate School by February 1, 2013 for full consideration. Posted: 12/13/12.

Baylor University: I (Sanghoon Kang) am actively recruiting motivated graduate students (Masters or Ph.D.) for my new laboratory in the Department of Biology. Research in my lab focuses on the diversity and dynamics of microbial communities along with environmental gradients such as biogeochemical parameters and spatial distribution. Research in my lab will involve field work (sampling and survey), lab work (genomic, transcriptomic and geochemical analyses) and computational work (multivariate statistics, geostatistics and statistical modeling). My lab is a part of an active interdisciplinary research effort, Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR), which will provide active collaboration opportunities with other biologists, geologists, chemists and environmental scientists. Joining students will be fully supported by either teaching assistantship or research assistantship. If interested, please contact me with your research interests and CV at Sanghoon_Kang@baylor.edu. Posted: 10/10/12.

Ben-Gurion University: I am looking for a student interested in Ph.D. studies in community ecology and foraging ecology starting in October 2012. The Ph.D. student must have a Master Degree prior to starting studies. Full support (with no teaching obligations) is available for 4 years. Research topics are at the discretion of the student. My research interests are in the community ecology of desert rodents, predator-prey foraging games, and behavioral indicators in conservation biology. The focus of my current research includes how macro-evolutionary trends--by way of compromise-breaking adaptation-- shape micro-ecological interactions--by way of foraging behavior and species interactions. I am also researching the physiological basis of trade-offs of food and safety in gerbils. My students do research on a wide range of topics in evolutionary ecology, including predator facilitation among owls, foxes, and snakes; daring behavior in predators; sight lines and vigilance behavior in ibex; disease ecology and Leishmania; foraging games between gerbils and owls; behavioral indicators in Mountain Nyala in Ethiopia. My laboratory is located in the Mitrani Department of Desert Ecology of Ben-Gurion University in Sede Boker, Israel. Interested students should contact me, Burt P. Kotler, via email at kotler@bgu.ac.il. Please include CV, a short statement of research interests, unofficial transcripts, and a letter of recommendation. Applications are due by July 30th, 2012. Posted: 7/13/12.

Boise State University: MS student opportunity on the Molecular Ecology of Grouse. The Department of Biological Sciences at Boise State University seeks an MS student to investigate “the co-evolutionary biochemical arms race between sagebrush and Greater sage-grouse.” A teaching assistantship will be provided with competitive salary, tuition, and health insurance. The project will require experience and/or interest in enzyme kinetics assays, metabolomics, proteomics, PCR, and/or western blots. Detailed objectives will be developed during the Fall 2013 semester, which begins 15 August 2013. Qualifications: a B.S. in Biology, chemistry, or closely related field; minimum of 3.0 GPA; average in at least the 50th percentile in the verbal, quantitative, and analytical portions of the general GRE exam. Prior experience with liquid or gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, enzyme kinetics, in vitro pharmacokinetic assays, proteomics, or genomics techniques are essential. Experience in statistical analysis of data and scientific writing is highly desired. Good interpersonal skills and ability to supervise undergraduate laboratory technicians are necessary. Contact: Please send, via email, 1) a cover letter specifically identifying how you meets the requirements listed above, 2) a CV; 3) an unofficial copy of your transcripts; 4) GRE scores (if available); and 5) the email addresses of 3 references to Dr. Jennifer S. Forbey: jenniferforbey@boisestate.edu. Applications will be reviewed starting 1/15/2013 and will continue until the position is filled. Final acceptance of student is contingent on availability of competitive teaching assistantships. Posted: 12/17/12.

Boise State University: Graduate research assistantship in the Ecosystem Ecology-lab at the Department of Biological Sciences. We are seeking a M.S. student to begin work on a project that investigates how land use change for cellulosic biofuel production affects soil carbon sequestration, and that tests how genetic variation in root traits affects biomass production, and soil carbon and nutrient cycling in bioenergy cropping systems. The project will allow the student to collaborate with researchers at Boise State University, Argonne National Lab, ETH-Zurich and the University of South Carolina. The position is available beginning August 2013; it includes tuition and a RA-stipend for two years. Qualified candidates should have a B.S. in ecology, soil science, forestry, botany/plant ecology, biology, geography, or a related discipline and a strong interest in ecosystem ecology, soil ecology and biogeochemistry. A basic familiarity with methods in soil biogeochemistry and some prior coursework in statistics are preferred. Interested candidates should submit (via e-mail) a statement of interest, CV, and contact information for three references to Dr. Marie-Anne de Graaff (marie-annedegraaff@boisestate.edu). Applications for graduate school are due by January 15th 2013. Posted: 10/22/12.

Brigham Young University: The College of Life Sciences invites applications for a PhD-level graduate research fellowship in plant physiological ecology and water relations starting in Fall 2013. This fellowship opportunity is part of a multi-year, NSF funded study aimed at understanding water resources sustainability in the urbanizing Wasatch Front (see www.iutahepscor.org for more information), and will specifically focus on water use by montane and subalpine trees. The doctoral student may earn their PhD through either the Biology or Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation doctoral programs depending on their area of focus. Ideally, candidates should have completed an M.S. in ecology, plant physiology, or ecosystem science, but candidates with BS degrees with research experience will be considered. The incumbent will be expected to work in an interdisciplinary, cross-institutional research team that includes researchers from Brigham Young, the University of Utah, and Utah State University. Faculty from these institutions are likely committee members and potential co-advisors. Prospective students should contact Dr. Richard Gill (rgill@byu.edu) or Dr. Sam St. Clair (stclair@byu.edu) by email for further information about this opportunity and include a current resume and a statement of research interests. Deadlines for applications to the Ph.D. programs are January 15 for Biology and February 1 for Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation. Posted: 12/19/12.

Brookhaven National Laboratory/Stony Brook University: The Rogers Lab is currently recruiting Ph.D. students with one (or more) of the following skill sets: • Experience with portable infrared gas analyzers. • An understanding of photosynthesis and experience modeling gas exchange. • Knowledge of Arctic plant communities and their ecology. • Experience conducting field work, particularly in extreme environments. A degree in the biological sciences is required, preferably in plant biology. Candidates with an interest in the measurement and model representation of leaf and plant community gas exchange, and those with extensive experience working with Arctic plant communities are strongly encouraged to apply. Students will have the opportunity to structure their thesis research around a newly-established multi institute U.S. Department of Energy Arctic research project, Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments-Arctic (NGEE-Arctic, ngee.ornl.gov). The successful candidate will conduct field research on the North Slope of Alaska and have the opportunity to collaborate with over fifty scientists engaged in the NGEE-Arctic project and the faculty and scientists at Stony Brook and Brookhaven. Financial support may be available through a combination of research grants, graduate fellowships, and teaching opportunities. Please send CV and cover letter describing research interests to Dr. Alistair Rogers atarogers@bnl.gov. The deadline for applicants to the Ecology & Evolution doctoral program at Stony Brook is January 15th. Posted: 12/12/12.

California State University, Northridge: The terHorst Lab is recruiting 1-2 students to the Master’s program for Fall 2013. Research in my lab (currently at Michigan State) generally focuses on community ecology and the factors that allow species to coexist. In particular, I am interested in how rapid evolution on contemporary time scales alters the outcome of species interactions and affects coexistence and genetic diversity in communities. My research combines theoretical and experimental approaches that bridge the gap between evolutionary biology and community ecology. I have used several systems to explore these questions, including interactions between invasive and native species in California grasslands, natural microcosm communities inside carnivorous pitcher plants, symbioses between corals and algal symbionts, and communities of epifaunal marine invertebrates. Students are welcome to work in any of these systems, but are also encouraged to develop work in other appropriate field or laboratory systems. Projects that include a theoretical component are encouraged, so programming skills are useful, but are not required. Some examples of potential Master’s student projects are: (a) genetic variation in invasive ability and selection on traits during invasion, (b) the effect of gene flow on local adaptation in natural microcosm communities, (c) contemporary evolutionary responses to global change. Northridge is located in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles and provides access to many different natural habitats. The location is within a short commute of West LA, Santa Monica, Hollywood, or most locations in the Valley. The Biology program at CSUN has a reputation of turning out excellent Master’s students who often continue on to top-tier Ph.D. programs. Interested candidates should send email inquiries to Casey terHorst (casey.terhorst@kbs.msu.edu) describing their career goals and previous research experience. Include a CV/resume, if appropriate. You should also give a sense of your research interests, but these need not be specific plans, as students will be encouraged to develop their own independent projects during their first year. Underrepresented groups in ecology are especially encouraged to apply. Applications to CSUN are due by March 15, but potential applicants should contact me well before then to determine whether or not you should apply. Interested applicants can also meet with me at the Benthic Ecology Meeting in Savannah, GA from 3/20-3/24. Posted: 2/7/13.

Carleton University: Graduate Opportunity in Quantitative Fish Spatial Ecology (MSc or PhD in Biology). We are seeking experienced and motivated students to join the Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Laboratory. Students are needed for a high-profile restoration ecology project in Toronto Harbour, involving the use of acoustic telemetry along with spatial and limnological datasets. The project involves collaboration with Dr. Susan Doka at Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Dr. Mathew Wells at the University of Toronto, and is a partnership that includes the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.We are seeking students with a strong background in computational biology, including experience with database management, programming (e.g. R, VB, MatLab etc) and ArcGIS usage.Experience with ecological modelling, fish ecology, analysis of fish movement data, and integration and analysis of biotic and abiotic data would be an asset.Applicants should have a good academic record and previous aquatic field experience. The student will be located at Carleton in Ottawa, Ontario. Graduate assistantships of $19k/yr are available January 2013 through September 2013. Unfortunately funding packages are limited to domestic students. Interested students should send a statement of interest, writing sample, and CV to Dr. Steven Cooke, steven_cooke@carleton.ca. Posted: 12/3/12.

Case Western Reserve University: The Burns lab is accepting applications for Ph.D. students to start in the fall of 2013. We study the mechanisms governing community assembly and biological invasions using a combination of field and greenhouse experiments, observational studies, and modeling, with an emphasis on phylogenetic comparative methods and demographic approaches. Applicants with an interest in plant community and population processes are encouraged to apply. Please e-mail Jean at jbm122 @ case.edu for more information or to discuss research in the lab. Jean will be at ESA in Portland 4-10 August; please e-mail if you'd like to talk in person. CWRU is located in Cleveland, Ohio. We conduct many of our experiments at CWRU's University Farm, which includes lab space, greenhouse facilities, and common garden space. Many local field sites are available. Collaborations in the lab currently include work with Research Scientist Dr. David Burke at Holden Arboretum and work with Cleveland Metroparks' Plant Community Assessment Program. Applications to the program are due 7 January. Please see the Biology Department web site at CWRU for more information on graduate admission. For more information about the application process, please contact: Julia Brown at jab12@case.edu or visit the School of Graduate Studies. Posted: 8/2/12.

Central Michigan University: A graduate student position is available beginning fall 2013 for a student wishing to pursue a Master of Science degree in Biology with an emphasis in Geomicrobiology at Central Michigan University. Accepted applicants will work with Dr. Deric Learman on interdisciplinary projects directed towards understanding the diversity, genetics, and physiology of microorganisms that control biogeochemical cycles (manganese, iron, and chromium) in various environments, ranging from lakes to soils. Additional information on potential research projects can be found at the Learman Laboratory website (see below). Graduate research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available for competitive applicants. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Deric Learman directly with a statement of interest and current CV. Successful applicants will have a Bachelors of Science in Biology, or Geology (or related field) with biology course work. Previous laboratory or undergraduate research experience is desired. Possible start date for incoming students is fall 2013 (start date negotiable). Information and application materials for the Master of Science in Biology at CMU are available at the Biology Department website. To be eligible for consideration, students must be admitted to the Graduate School at CMU. Contact: Dr. Deric Learman, Institute for Great Lakes Research, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Department of Biology, 319 Brooks Hall, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 USA. E-mail: deric.learman@cmich.edu, Phone: 989-774-4409. Closing Date: May 31st, 2013. Posted: 1/8/13.

Central Michigan University: Two graduate positions are available beginning summer/fall 2013 for full-time students wishing to pursue a Master of Science degree in Biology with an emphasis in aquatic/marine molecular ecology. Accepted applicants will work with Dr. Andrew Mahon on projects involving molecular detection in aquatic systems, population genetics, biodiversity monitoring, and/or phylogeogrpahy of Antarctic benthic invertebrates and larvae. Currently funded projects incorporate modern molecular methods in combination with significant field research to address important scientific questions on local, regional, and global scales. Student funding of up to $21k/year is available in the form of research and/or teaching assistantships. In addition, tuition waivers are available (subject to annual renewal). Interested parties should contact Dr. Andrew Mahon directly (mahon2a@cmich.edu, 989-774-1177) with a statement of interest and current CV. Additional information on potential research projects can be found at the Mahon Laboratory website (see below). Information and application materials for the Master of Science in Biology at CMU are available at the Biology Department website. The successful applicant will have a BS degree in a biological field as well as experience with general molecular techniques and undergraduate research experience. To be eligible for consideration students must be admitted to the Graduate School at CMU and have completed a graduate assistantship application (.doc) to the Department of Biology. Closing Date: March 1st, 2013. Posted: 11/7/12.

Centre Tecnològic Forestal de Catalunya: We search for PhD candidates interested in developing a PhD on the applications of species distribution models (SDM) in the evaluation of the impacts of climate and land use changes on fire regimes and biodiversity. The successful candidate will work in the Biodiversity and landscape Ecology lab within the Joint research unit that the CTFC has recently created with the CREAF in Barcelona. Requirements: • Degree in biology, forestry, geography or similar. • Proven experience in GIS and remote sensing data (i.e Landsat). analyses. Programming skills preferred. • Proven experience in R statistical programming language . • Proven experience in the development of species distribution models (SDM). • Proven experience in writing scientific articles. • High proficiency in English language. Interested candidates can send a CV and a motivation letter (one page maximum written in English), via e-mail to lluis.brotons@ctfc.cat Candidates which do not meet a minimum of 5 out the 6 criteria will not be considered. The selection process will be open until a suitable candidate is found. Posted: 7/17/12.

Chatham University: the School of Sustainability and the Environment is now offering a Masters of Sustainability degree – a two-year, full-time cohort program, providing students with an innovative and unique approach to the study of sustainability. Our program is an immersive, challenge-based curriculum in which students learn to communicate, practice, and champion sustainability in a range of settings. Through projects, community engagement, internships, and seminars, our students engage in real-world sustainability challenges to develop an academically sound yet professionally oriented approach to simultaneously improve economic development, social justice, and the biophysical environment. Last fall we broke ground School of Sustainability and the Environment’s future home: the Eden Hall campus. This new campus, a 388-acre former farm/retreat just 18 miles north of Pittsburgh, is designed as a living learning sustainability lab. We are designing the campus, located at the urban/rural interface, to produce more energy than it uses, manage wastewater and storm water on site, produce food sustainably, and regenerate the surrounding ecosystem. We have already begun to teach and research sustainable agriculture practices. As we build the campus, students will be participate in managing water and energy systems, exploring how to use and improve both technology and behavior. Eventually, this facility will serve more than 1,500 students. We are currently enrolling students in our second cohort. We still have space, as well as some excellent funding opportunities, for individuals who are committed to the principles of sustainability. We are less interested in their disciplinary backgrounds (our current cohort includes scientists, social scientists, writers and artists) than in their commitment to working across disciplines. Please share our program with any and all students who you believe would be excited to join our program. They may also contact Trish Golla, our Assistant Director of Graduate Admissions for the School of Sustainability and the Environment, with any questions or to set up a visit to campus. She can be reached at pgolla@chatham.edu or 412.365.1386. Posted: 4/4/13.

Chinese Academy of Sciences: Opportunities studying / collaborating available at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan Province, China. Our group studies the connections between behavioral ecology, community ecology and conservation science, with most of our experience in birds, although researchers in other taxa are welcome. Looking for students at the Masters or Ph.D. level, who would get their degrees at the Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Positions available for postdoctoral researchers as well. We also welcome visiting undergraduates or graduate students, provided a minimum of two months stay. Please contact: eben.goodale@gmail.com. Posted: 3/29/13.

Clark University: Applications are invited for PhD assistantships in Earth System Science within the Graduate School of Geography. Assistantships cover tuition, provide an annual stipend, and include eligibility for a competitive fellowship. Clark's Earth System Science program features expertise in snow and ice mass balance and biophysics, terrestrial ecosystems and global change, hydrology, forest ecology, biogeography, Arctic System Science, sea ice and marine productivity and biogeochemistry, remote sensing of land cover and change, disturbance and landscape ecology, and GISci. For complete details see our website (link below), or contact Brenda Nikas-Hayes, BNikasHayes@clarku.edu, 508-793-7337. Applicants are encouraged to communicate with prospective advisors. Posted: 10/5/12.

Clemson University: The Sears Lab is accepting graduate students (Masters or Doctoral) for the Fall of 2013. Students with interests in how physiology and behavior respond to changing climates (over ecological or evolutionary time scales) are encouraged to apply. Potential projects can take either theoretical (modeling) or experimental approaches in a lab or field context. Though the lab is particularly focussed on reptiles and amphibians, students with specific ideas for projects in other taxa are welcome to apply. Furthermore, research is typically focussed on systems in the desert SW (reptiles) or in the southeastern US (reptiles and amphibians). If interested, please send a brief statement of interests, CV, GRE scores, and a copy of your transcript (does not need to be official) to Mike Sears (sears3@clemson.edu). Review of applicants will begin immediately. The university deadline for applications is January 15, 2013. For information regarding the graduate program at Clemson, please see Graduate Studies in Biological Sciences and Ecology. Posted: 12/14/12.

Clemson University: One Ph.D. graduate student is sought to conduct research on disturbance impact on forest ecosystems in the southeast US. The research project will study the response of southern pine forests following catastrophic hurricane events, with an emphasis on post-hurricane fuel dynamics and its potential interactions with wildland fire. Of the particular interest is the ecological resilience of forest ecosystems when subjected to extreme or interacting disturbances. National forests affected by major hurricane events between 1989 and 2010 in the southeast US will be sampled in the study. Data collected in this study will be used together with previously collected data as well as data derived from published studies, remote sensing images, and national forest inventories to achieve the research objectives. We are seeking an outstanding candidate with BS and/or MS in Forestry, Biology, Ecology, and Environmental Sciences. A past record of scientific publication and experience in conducting vegetation sampling in forest ecosystems as well as stand/ecosystem modeling are desirable. The student will be offered a full graduate assistantship ($20k/year) plus tuition waiver. The assistantship is for a minimum of 3 years, but needs to be renewed annually subject to satisfactory performance. Competitive university and/or college scholarships are also available for outstanding candidates, and students working in our lab have had a great track record to obtain these scholarships. The assistantship may start in January 2013 or May 2013. If you are interested, contact: Dr. Geoff Wang, School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences, 261 Lehotsky Hall, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0317 (Phone: 864-656-4864; Email: gwang@clemson.edu). In your initial contact, please send the following information: statement of your research interest, degrees earned, GPAs, GRE score, and TOFEL scores (for foreign students). Posted: 11/20/12.

Clemson University: The DeWalt lab invites applications for a MS or PhD position in plant ecology starting in August 2013. The successful applicant will begin paid work in May 2013 on a project examining the population ecology of Carolina bogmint, Macbridea caroliniana, at the Congaree National Park in South Carolina. Combined RA/TA support will be provided in the first year, with guaranteed TA support thereafter. Interested students should send an email to Dr. Saara DeWalt (saarad@clemson.edu) by Nov. 19th with the following documents: 1) cover letter outlining research interests and experiences; the date in May 2013 the applicant would be available to start work at the Congaree; GRE scores, if available; and names and contact information for 2-3 references; 2) resume/CV; and 3) copies of transcripts (unofficial is fine). The email should have "Plant Ecology assistantship" in the subject line. Qualified applicants will be invited to apply to the Graduate School and the Department of Biological Sciences at Clemson. Posted: 11/9/12.

Clemson University: The School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences has an opening for an MS-seeking student starting in the spring or fall semester of 2013. The student will work on a fully-funded project assessing the vulnerability of coastal marsh birds to large-scale environmental stressors such as development, habitat fragmentation, and sea level rise. This project will involve extensive field work and related travel along the Georgia and South Carolina coast. Qualifications: The successful applicant will be motivated and have a proven ability to generate high-quality work in an unsupervised environment. S/he should have excellent writing and communication skills and an interest in working cooperatively. Previous experience with field work is required and the ability (or a proven ability to learn) to ID bird species of the Atlantic coast is desired. Minimum academic requirements are a BS degree in wildlife, biology, or related field, a 3.0 GPA, and a combined verbal + quantitative GRE score of 314 or higher. For additional information please send a CV and letter of application (which should include a description of experiences, skills, and interest in this project) to Dr. Kyle Barrett (rbarre2@clemson.edu). Review of applications will begin immediately, and competitive candidates will be invited to submit a full application. Posted: 9/27/12.

Clemson University: Graduate Research Assistantship (Ph.D.) in Wildlife Ecology. The School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences and the South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Clemson is seeking candidates for a graduate research assistantship (Ph.D.) in Wildlife Ecology to take the lead on a research project designed to better understand the factors affecting alligator population dynamics in coastal South Carolina. The student will lead an effort to determine alligator occupancy of varying habitat types, habitat requirements (ex. water levels as determined through remote sensing data), and habitat stressors (ex. contamination). Population and occupancy modeling of existing and newly collected data sets will be used to make recommendations of harvest limits and develop a conservation plan for alligators. This largely is a quantitative, analytical research effort but there will be some opportunities for the student to conduct fieldwork. The work will focus on developing conservation recommendations to aid state managers with decision making related to harvest and developing improved survey protocols to estimate abundance and distribution of alligator populations. This work will directly support the development of an adaptive management and conservation action plan for alligator harvest and population management in the state. The project will be focus on South Carolina populations but the results of this work will have far reaching impacts on alligator management throughout the southeast. The position will be available beginning in the fall of 2012 but will be open until filled. Research stipends are approximately $16k, and a full tuition waiver is available. Applicants should possess an M.S. degree in Wildlife Ecology, Biostatistics, or related field, a good work ethic, and strong quantitative or modeling skills. Extensive experience with statistical analyses of ecological data, proficiency in ArcGIS, and population and occupancy modeling are required. To be competitive, applicants must have undergraduate and graduate GPAs > 3.4 and a general GRE score > 1200. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Applicants that are selected for an interview will be contacted directly by Dr. Kate McFadden. Interested applicants should send a cover letter outlining their qualifications for the project, copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for at least 3 references. Application materials can be sent by e-mail and should be saved as a single pdf in the following format: Last Name_First Name_Alligator PHD.pdf. Contact information is: Dr. Kate McFaden, G20 Lehotsky Hall, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, 29634, 864-656-4141, kwm6@clemson.edu. Posted: 7/23/12.

Colorado State University: Restoration Ecology. A Graduate Research Assistantship is available for a Ph.D. candidate to work on vegetation establishment processes on a constructed fen in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada. Northern Alberta contains the largest deposit of oil sands in the world, and it is being mined using open-pit techniques. These activities disturb large land areas of upland forest and peatland ecosystems. Our project, near Fort McMurray, is developing, implementing and evaluating techniques for establishing peat-forming vegetation (bryophytes and vascular plants) on a self-sustaining constructed fen. Oil industry partners and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada are sponsoring this collaborative project between Colorado State University and three Canadian Universities. The successful candidate would contribute to and conduct research on the vascular plant component of this program, evaluating techniques and ecological processes that facilitate or limit plant establishment and growth. The candidate would work closely with hydrologists, geochemists, engineers, and ecologists studying this experimental ecosystem, and there will be many opportunities for cross-disciplinary integration and international collaboration. Applicants must have a MS in ecology or an allied field, and experience working with vascular plants. Experience in plant sampling at the individual and population scale, statistics, and ecophysiology are desirable. Previous experience in restoration ecology is also desirable. The student would be admitted to Colorado State University through the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, with Dr. David J. Cooper as advisor and mentor, and be housed in the Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship. The assistantship pays 12-month salary, tuition, travel and field expenses, housing during the summer in Fort McMurray, and participation in conferences and workshops. To apply send a letter of interest stating your qualifications and a current CV via email, to Dr. Cooper, David.Cooper@colostate.edu. Posted: 12/3/12.

Colorado State University: We seek a self-motivated and creative doctoral student to conduct research on the evolutionary ecology of Song Sparrows on the California Channel Islands. Fieldwork will start in late spring 2013 and the student will enroll at Colorado State University (CSU) in the 2013 fall semester. This dissertation research will be part of multi-investigator project involving CSU, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service, and The Nature Conservancy. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Chris Funk and Dr. Cameron Ghalambor at CSU, and be supported by both teaching and research assistantships. A key project objective is to understand how population structure and local adaptation can inform conservation management of the sparrow in Channel Islands National Park. The student will have freedom to develop a thesis topic, so long as the dissertation overlaps sufficiently with this objective. We welcome applications from prospective students with a record of academic excellence, a strong interest in evolution and avian ecology, and extensive training in the observation, capture, and handling of wild birds. Ideal candidates will have a Master’s degree, molecular lab experience, at least one publication, and graduate coursework in statistics and genetics. The successful applicant will need to meet the entrance requirements for doctoral candidates at CSU’s Department of Biology. To apply, email your CV (including names, phone numbers, and email addresses of three references) and a one-page statement of research interests to sparrow.student2013@pobox.com. We anticipate selecting a Ph.D. candidate by February 2013. Posted: 11/30/12.

Colorado State University: Ph.D. position in Restoration Ecology. A Graduate Research Assistantship is available to work on establishing vegetation on a constructed fen in the oil sands region of Alberta, CANADA. Northern Alberta contains the largest deposit of oil sands in the world, and it is being mined using open-pit techniques. These activities disturb large land areas of upland forest and peatland ecosystems. Our project, near Fort McMurray, is developing, implementing and evaluating techniques for establishing peat-forming vegetation (bryophytes and vascular plants) on a self-sustaining constructed fen. Oil industry partners and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada are sponsoring this collaborative project between Colorado State University and three Canadian Universities. The successful candidate would contribute to and conduct research on the vascular plant component of this program, evaluating techniques and ecological processes that facilitate or limit plant establishment and growth, with the goal of achieving a continuous vegetation cover and peat accumulation. The candidate would work closely with hydrologists, geochemists, engineers, and ecologists studying this experimental ecosystem, and there will be many opportunities for cross-disciplinary integration and international collaboration. Applicants must have a MS in ecology or an allied field, and experience working with vascular plants. Experience in plant sampling at the individual and population scale, statistics, ecophysiology, and above and below ground production are desirable. Experience in restoration programs is also important. The student would be admitted to Colorado State University through the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, with Dr. David J. Cooper as advisor and mentor, and be housed in the Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship. The assistantship pays 12-month salary, tuition, travel and field expenses, housing during the summer in Fort McMurray, and participation in conferences and workshops. To apply send a letter of interest explicitly stating your qualifications and a current CV via email, to Dr. Cooper, David.Cooper@colostate.edu. Posted: 10/8/12.

Colorado State University: We have an opening for a graduate student seeking a Ph.D. in the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology starting in January 2013. The successful applicant will: 1) develop sampling and analysis procedures for ground-based estimates of ungulate population size in conservation areas; 2) develop methods for estimating the effects of boundary harvest on survival of animals within conservation areas, and 3) model cross boundary movement of ungulates using telemetry data. The position is fully funded by the National Park Service. An annul stipend, full tuition waiver, and expenses for field work will be provided. Requirements include a master's degree in ecology, wildlife biology, statistics or related field. Strong quantitative skills are required. Training in maximum likelihood and/or Bayesian methods for parameter estimation and GIS skills are desirable. There will be an opportunity to do a preliminary interview at the Annual Meeting of the Wildlife Society in Portland Oregon (October 16-18, 2012). To apply, send letter of interest, curriculum vitae, GRE scores, master's degree transcripts, and a writing sample (manuscript, report, etc) to Tom.Hobbs@colostate.edu. U.S. citizenship is not required, but only U.S. citizens will be eligible for a full tuition waiver. Posted: 9/14/12.

Colorado State University: Graduate Research Assistantship. We have an opening for a graduate student seeking a Ph.D. in the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology starting in December 2012 or May 2013. The successful applicant will study trophic and hydrologic controls on willow communities in Yellowstone National Park to reveal how the reintroduction of wolves has shaped ecosystem processes. The position is fully funded by an LTREB award from the National Science Foundation. An annual stipend, full tuition waiver, and housing during 3-4 months of annual work in the field will be provided. Requirements include a master's degree in ecology or related field, strong quantitative skills, and the ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing. There will be an opportunity to do a preliminary interview at the Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America in Portland, Oregon (August 4-8, 2012) and at the Annual Meeting of the Wildlife Society, also in Portland (October 16-18, 2012). Contact Tom Hobbs (Tom.Hobbs@colostate.edu) and David Cooper (David.Cooper@colostate.edu) to express interest. Posted: 7/6/12.

Columbia University: The Uriarte lab is seeking doctoral students to work on the impacts of climate variability on tropical forest dynamics. Within this general area, the topic of research is flexible. Strong quantitative skills are desirable. Interested parties should contact Dr. Maria Uriarte at mu2126@columbia.edu. Posted: 10/1/12.

Cornell University: We seek to fill a M.S. Graduate Research Assistantship with the New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research and the Department of Natural Resources. The candidate will use spatially-referenced moose observations from northern New York to fit landscape occupancy models to estimate changes in population distribution and abundance. The project aims to contribute to moose management by providing inference on the impacts of land-use patterns, climate, disease, and interspecific interactions on population processes. Some field work may be possible, but the position will be largely analytical. The project, in collaboration with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and local NGOs, will also focus on developing broader management and population goals for moose in New York, including the characterization of stakeholder concerns for population-level thresholds. Qualifications: We seek a student with an outstanding academic background in Ecology, Natural Resources, Statistics or a closely related field. The student should be independent and motivated to work with a broad range of external collaborators. Successful applicants will possess strong writing and oral communication skills, as well as a desire to conduct quantitative science for applied resource management needs. Preference will be given to applicants with previous modeling and computational skills. Interested candidates should send a cover letter detailing your research interests and experience, a CV, photocopy (unofficial) of transcripts and GRE scores and contact information for 3 references to Drs. Mitchell Eaton (mje57@cornell.edu) and Angela Fuller (angela.fuller@cornell.edu) by March 8, 2013. Questions regarding the position should be directed via e-mail to Dr. Mitchell Eaton. Posted: 2/14/13.

Dalhousie University: Openings for PhD and MSc students are available in the laboratory of Dr. Glenn Crossin at Dalhousie (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada) for research on the physiology and winter ecology of migratory birds and fish. Project 1 seeks a PhD student, and will focus on migratory carryover effects in Common eider breeding at Southampton Island, Nunavut. Project 2 seeks a PhD student and will focus on physiological ecology of white sturgeon in the Fraser River, British Columbia. Project 3 seeks an MSc. student and will focus on winter ecology and carryover effects in Atlantic salmon and Arctic char at sites in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland & Labrador. Candidates should have a strong interest in evolutionary and conservation physiology, and have some experience handling wild animals (birds would be best, but these skills often apply across taxa), as well as general field biology experience. Work will involve physiological sampling and applying telemetry devices to track the winter migrations of individual animals. The candidate for the PhD position should have experience with blood sampling techniques, physiological (hormonal) assays, and extensive field experience. Positions can begin in summer or fall 2013. Graduate assistantships begin at $21,236/yr (PhD) and $20,891/yr (MSc). Students with external scholarship support are encouraged to apply and will be given preference. Unfortunately, funding packages are only available to domestic students. If interested please e-mail a statement of research interests, CV with publication list, transcripts of undergraduate record (for those seeking the MSc slot), and the names and e-mail addresses of two people willing to act as academic references to: Dr. Glenn Crossin, Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1. Email: gtc@dal.ca. Posted: 12/5/12, revised: 2/27/13.

Dartmouth College: PhD position in linked ecological and socio-cultural implications of rapid environmental change. Application Deadline: March 1, 2013. Start Date: Summer or Fall 2013. We invite applicants for a PhD opening in the Ecosystems, Societies and Knowledge research group. Our research group seeks to address complex, terrestrial natural resource issues affecting indigenous peoples. We seek a doctoral student who will work closely with one or more tribal communities to study socio-ecological implications of rapid environmental change. The ideal student will be interested in working with an indigenous community to understand how rapid environmental changes impact culturally significant resources and/or tribal cultural landscapes and, reciprocally, how traditional resource management and knowledge systems respond to environmental change. Qualifications: The student should have a MS or equivalent research experiences in natural resource management and ecology, environmental science and/or field biology. Students should have their own existing working relationships with a tribal community or a willingness to work with the PI in one of their research sites in the Great Lakes region. Applicants will need to apply to the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program before final acceptance. Interested individuals should send a letter stating research interests, CV or resume, and names and contact information of 3 references by email to: Dr. Nicholas J. Reo (Nicholas.J.Reo@Dartmouth.edu), Assistant Professor, Native American Studies and Environmental Studies. Posted: 2/5/13.

Dartmouth College: We have a Ph.D. graduate fellowship available to begin as soon as summer 2013 in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program of the Department of Biological Sciences at Dartmouth College. The successful candidate will be a co-investigator in "Intercontinental comparisons of the ecology and impacts of an invasive forest insect: the case of the European woodwasp, Sirex noctilio." Other team members are: Sandy Liebhold (US Forest Service), Juan Corley (Ecología de Insectos, INTA Bariloche, Argentina), Maria Lombardero (Departamento de Produccio?n Vegetal, Universidad de Santiago, Spain), and Mike Wingfield, Brett Hurley, Bernard Slippers, and Jeff Garnas (Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, South Africa). Requirements include ability to conceive and conduct original research within the umbrella of a larger project, as well as enthusiasm for international travel, field biology, and collaboration. The EEB Graduate Program at Dartmouth is top tier in terms of intellectual environment, resources for graduate students, and success of alumni. To initiate an application, email a CV and statement of interest to Matt Ayres (Matt.Ayres@Dartmouth.edu). There is no hard deadline but applications will be reviewed promptly. International applications are welcome. The project is supported by USDA Forest Service International Programs. Highly qualified candidates may be eligible for a GAANN Fellowship with a stipend of up to $30k. posted: 1/24/13.

Dartmouth College: Rebecca Irwin’s lab invites applications to the Ph.D. Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB). My lab is particularly interested in a graduate student who wants to study the effects of environmental change on plants, pollinators, and their interactions. The student will be able to take part in a long-term bee monitoring program while also developing a dissertation project broadly related to environmental change and pollination. Field work will take place at the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab in Colorado, a field station well-known for research in pollination ecology. The EEB graduate program at Dartmouth has a core group of enthusiastic faculty, graduate students and post-docs who provide an exciting environment in which to pursue a Ph.D. Generous financial support is provided in the form of Dartmouth Fellowships, health care, and a substantial yearly discretionary fund for research and travel that are guaranteed for 5 years. Applicants with excellent records and who demonstrate financial need are also eligible for a U.S. Department of Education Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) Fellowship. Detailed information about the program, and access to online applications, are available at the program link above. I encourage students interested in a position in my lab to contact me directly before applying. In your email, include a brief statement of your current and/or future research interests related to pollination ecology and a CV. Email to: Rebecca.Irwin@Dartmouth.edu. Applications to the Dartmouth EEB graduate program will be considered beginning on December 1, 2012. Promising applicants will be invited and hosted for interviews in January. Posted: 10/2/12.

Dartmouth College: The Graduate Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology invites applications from prospective Ph.D. students. We offer a wide range of opportunities for studying a diversity of biological systems from ecological and evolutionary perspectives, and our core group of enthusiastic faculty, graduate students and post-docs provide an exciting environment in which to pursue a Ph.D (Department of Biological Sciences). Generous financial support is provided in the form of Dartmouth Fellowships, health care, and a substantial yearly discretionary fund for research and travel that are guaranteed for 5 years. Applicants with excellent records and who demonstrate financial need are also eligible for a U.S. Department of Education Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) Fellowship. Detailed information about the program, and access to online applications, are available at the program link above. We encourage interested students to contact faculty prior to applying. Applications will be considered beginning on December 1st. Promising applicants will be invited and hosted for interviews in January. Posted: 10/2/12.

Durham University: Two Ecology PhD opportunities are available for high quality students at Durham, UK. Details are available at findaphd.com and in the pdfs linked below. (1) Management of savannah ecosystems for biodiversity: impacts of burning on mammal and bird populations Supervised by Dr Stephen Willis & Dr Philip Stephens, School of Biological Sciences. We aim to explore the use of burning as a management tool to optimise biodiversity across taxa. We will study the annual and inter-annual utilisation of grassland blocks in relation to their spatial configuration. In addition, we will contrast grasslands use by herbivores and birds in areas with and without top predators. (2) Climate impacts on terrestrial nomadic birds of the Australian interior Supervised by Dr Stephen Willis, Durham University; Dr Richard Fuller, University of Queensland. The project aims to collect data on bird abundances, continuing monitoring undertaken in 2011 and 2012 following an extreme La Nina climatic event, and to analyse these combined data to determine the role of climate and other factors in determining the distribution of terrestrial birds of the interior of Australia. Such species are poorly understood; here we intend to develop a better understanding of their ecology and hence how best to protect them against current and future threats. The projects are in competition with others for funding. Success will depend on the quality of applications received, relative to those for competing projects. Contact s.g.willis@durham.ac.uk if you have specific queries. Closes 7 Feb 2013. Posted: 1/23/13.

Durham University: PhD opportunity: Can face flies, Musca autumnalis, transmit tuberculosis from badgers to cattle? Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is an infectious disease of considerable economic and social importance in the UK where its control has cost the taxpayer £500m over the past decade. Currently, control is targeted at culling badgers. Badger-to-cattle transmission of the bovine tuberculosis (bTB) agent Mycobacterium bovis remains poorly understood. We hypothesise that the cattle face fly, Musca autumnalis, may vector Mycobacterium bovis, from infected-badger faeces directly to cattle. This seems possible since the flies are common where bTB occurs, they land frequently on the nostrils and mouths of cattle and they are attracted to badger faeces. We propose to explore this relationship by carrying out field and laboratory research to investigate the dynamics of possible transmission. This project is in competition with others for funding. Success will depend on the quality of applications received, relative to those for competing projects. If you are interested in applying, in the first instance contact Professor S.W. Lindsay (s.w.lindsay@durham.ac.uk) with a CV and covering letter, detailing your reasons for applying for the project. More on Durham University: http://www.dur.ac.uk/postgraduate/. Posted: 1/7/13.

East Carolina University: Krista McCoy in the Department of Biology invites applications from highly motivated and organized prospective Masters and PhD students interested in understanding the mechanisms through which endocrine disrupting chemicals alter normal development, physiology, and behavior and (or) the implications of those alterations on individual, population, or community level processes. Ideally, my new laboratory will consist of happy and engaged students that are interested in wildlife conservation and/or human health. Students who apply must be comfortable giving and receiving constructive feedback and be excited to train and collaborate with undergraduates, other graduate students, and post docs. Students will also be expected to attend departmental seminars, excel in classes, teach, and attend weekly laboratory meetings. If you are interested please 1) Read some of my publications which can be found at http://www.ecu.edu/biology/mccoy_krista.cfm (contact me if you do not have access to full articles) and 2) Contact me at mccoyk@ecu.edu with the following information (be brief at this stage): a)Your interests generally and specifically in joining my lab, b) What experiences have motivated you to pursue, and prepared you for, graduate school, c) Curriculum Vitae (include GPA, and GRE scores). Posted: 10/30/12.

East Carolina University: The graduate program in the Department of Biology invites applications from prospective PhD and MS students for fall 2013. ECU is the third largest campus in the UNC system and has an active and well-supported group of faculty working in the areas of ecology and evolution. Currently, we have 72 MS students and 24 doctoral students enrolled in our graduate programs. Students accepted into the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in Biological Sciences will receive two years of support with no teaching obligations and at least five years of support total, at a very competitive level. TA-ships are readily available in our two MS programs and Biology faculty members also supervise students in ECU's Coastal Resource Management PhD program. Graduate students will be encouraged to participate in the North Carolina Center for Biodiversity (NCCB) at East Carolina University. Goals of the NCCB include training graduate students in biodiversity research and providing them opportunities to participate in related outreach. Our students enjoy living in the affordable community of Greenville, NC, participating in seminar series and journal clubs that feature research in ecology and evolution, and having access to several natural areas, universities and research centers located in central and eastern NC. Our faculty members conduct research across the globe and excellent opportunities exist to work in terrestrial, freshwater, wetland and marine systems. Application deadlines vary with particular programs but students applying early will have a greater chance of receiving financial support. Please visit http://www.ecu.edu/biology/ to find out more about our department, faculty and graduate programs. In addition to visiting departmental and faculty websites, please contact prospective mentors directly or our director of graduate studies, Terry West (westt@ecu.edu), for more information. We are happy to arrange visits for competitive prospective students and additional scholarship support may be available for the strongest applicants. Departmental faculty with expertise in ecology and evolution include: Marcelo Ardon: Aquatic ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. Chris Balakrishnan: Avian evolutionary and behavioral genomics. David Chalcraft: Population and community ecology; ecological aspects of biodiversity. Robert Christian: Coastal ecosystem ecology and network ecology. Lisa Clough: Marine benthic ecology (Arctic and Atlantic). Ashley Egan: Plant bioinformatics, evolutionary genomics and systematics. Carol Goodwillie: Plant mating system evolution, plant population ecology and genetics. Pat Harris: Fish ecology and life history, fisheries management. Jinling Huang: Evolutionary genomics and bioinformatics. Claudia Jolls: Plant evolutionary ecology and conservation. Dave Kimmel: Plankton ecology. Trip Lamb: Systematics and phylogeography. Joe Luczkovich: Food web ecology and fish bioacoustics. Krista McCoy (joining our faculty Jan. 2013): Ecological development and physiology. Mike McCoy: Quantitative population and community ecology. Jeff McKinnon: Sexual selection, speciation, mainly in fish. Sue McRae: Behavioral ecology and social evolution in birds. Anthony Overton: Larval fish ecology, fisheries biology. Enrique Reyes: Landscape ecology, ecological modeling, coastal management. Roger Rulifson: Fish ecology and fisheries. Matt Schrenk: Microbial ecology, geo-microbiology. Ed Stellwag: Vertebrate evo-devo and cis-regulatory network evolution. John Stiller: Molecular evolution and comparative genomics. Kyle Summers: Evolution of color, behavior in poison frogs; evolutionary medicine. Heather Vance-Chalcraft: Community ecology. Terry West: Human impacts on coastal ecosystems. Baohong Zhang: MicroRNA evolution, comparative genomics, and molecular genetics. Yong Zhu: Comparative evolution and molecular functions of hormones and receptors. Posted: 10/23/12.

East Carolina University: I (Michael McCoy anura@ufl.edu) invite applications from prospective MS and PhD students. Research in my lab focuses on a variety of questions in conservation, population, and community ecology as well as the development of experimental and quantitative approaches that help to better link empirical data to ecological and evolutionary theory. In my research, I typically take a mechanistic approach aimed at understanding how variation in individual traits (e.g. size, stage and phenotype) scale up to influence population and community level processes and spatial coupling across ecosystems. Within this broader context, my research can be loosely categorized into five interrelated conceptual themes; 1) the ecological consequences of phenotypic plasticity, 2) body size dependence of ecological interactions, 3) cross ecosystem links formed by the sequential process of complex life cycles, 4) understanding predator diversity effects, and 5) the development of innovative experimental and quantitative approaches. I work in a variety of systems including temperate, tropical, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. I will consider students with interests in a variety of topics and systems (including but not restricted to those in which I work) that address complementary questions in population and community ecology, climate change and conservation. For additional information about me, my research and the application process please visit the links above. Posted: 9/14/12.

Eastern Illinois University: I (Jill Deppe) am seeking a highly motivated Master’s Student to work on an NSF-funded project examining migration strategies and survival of songbirds crossing the Gulf of Mexico. The successful candidate will travel to Mexico to assist with the set up and maintenance of automated radio-telemetry towers and will be responsible for analyzing radio-telemetry data to address questions regarding relationships among departure behavior, survival, bird attributes and atmospheric conditions. The successful candidate will work with project collaborators at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Southern Mississippi, Ohio State University and USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center as well as Mexican cooperators and reserve staff in the northern Yucatan Peninsula. Qualifications: B. S. in Biology or Ecology. Student should be highly motivated, able to work independently and as part of a team, and have an interest in bird migration. Strong communication and analytical skills and the ability to speak and understand Spanish are required. Previous research experience or experience with radio telemetry are a plus. Student must have a minimum GPA of 3.5 and meet requirements for admission into the Master’s program in the Department of Biological Sciences. Position supported by a full-time research assistantship and includes tuition waiver. Close date: February 15, 2013 or until filled. Start date: July 2013. If interested please send cover letter, CV, unofficial transcripts and contact information for three professional references to Dr. Jill Deppe at jldeppe@eiu.edu. Posted: 1/9/13.

ETH Zurich: The Forest Ecology Group at ETH Zurich (Switzerland) is seeking a Ph.D. student to focus on the modeling and analysis of climate and land use effects on forest landscape dynamics See the detailed advertisement for more information. Screening will start 15 April 2013. Posted: 3/19/13.

ETH Zurich: The Chair of Building Physics of ETHZ studies the multiple physical aspects of porous materials and their interactions with fluids. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division is studying the physiology of trees under changing climate, especially drought, and developing mechanistic understanding of tree mortality during drought. We are offering a: PhD position with focus on Transport of fluids in trees using advanced experimental methods for candidates with a Diploma or Masters degree in Mechanical, Civil, Agricultural or Material Engineering, Bioengineering, Material Sciences, or equivalent. Climate change may impose severely different conditions on trees which may, or not, be able to cope by modifying their regulation of liquid flow. In a tree, the xylem and the phloem form a continuous system from the roots to the leaves where the xylem (a dead tissue) transports water up and phloem (a living tissue) transports the sugary sap down. Flow in the xylem is thought to passively respond to changes in pressure gradients whereas, in the phloem, the plant can control flow actively by osmotic means. To understand how climate affects trees and forest distributions, we need to know how trees regulate liquid flow and how the xylem and phloem tissues interact. The project will consist of a multiscale experimental investigation of the geometry of the cellular structure, including sub-cellular features, and documentation of the liquid flow in the phloem and the xylem for trees grown under different environmental conditions. Advanced high resolution imaging techniques such as neutron tomography and synchroton X-ray nano/micro-tomography will be used. The ideal candidate is a communicative scientist with a strong background in experimental mass transport and/or biological and physical sciences. Experience in imaging is an asset. Mastering of the English language is required. The supervisor is Prof. Dr. Jan Carmeliet. The project includes joint affiliation with EMPA, Dübendorf and with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Dr. Sanna Sevanto. Additional information can be obtained by contacting Prof Dr Dominique Derome, dominique.derome@empa.ch. We are looking forward to receiving your application including a CV, letter of interest and names and addresses of references through the website. Posted: 10/5/12.

Florida Atlantic University: Graduate research positions (MSc) are available in the Plant Ecology Lab, starting in the summer or fall 2013. We are seeking students interested in fire ecology and/or carbon cycling in the Florida Everglades watershed to participate in projects funded through the US Geological Survey and US Department of Energy. Research in the Plant Ecology Lab focuses on the influence of disturbances (particularly fire and drought) on plant community structure and ecosystem carbon cycling in peat-forming wetlands from the Everglades to Alaska. Interdisciplinary collaborations and multi-biome studies avail opportunity for synergistic activities with other on-going research projects. Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree in biology, ecology, hydrology, or a related field (currently or prior to enrollment). Successful candidates must demonstrate an aptitude for research and the ability to work independently. Prior research experience in fire ecology, carbon cycling and/or plant ecology is preferred, as is the ability to conduct rigorous fieldwork in remote settings. A current, valid U.S. driver's license is preferred. Consideration of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the positions are filled. The application deadline for the Environmental Sciences Master's program is March 15, 2013. Applicants should send a written statement of graduate research interest, a copy of their CV or resume (including GPA and GRE scores), and names and contact information for two references via email to Dr. Brian Benscoter (bbenscot@fau.edu). Posted: 12/21/12, revised: 2/4/13.

Florida Atlantic University: A master's graduate research position is available in the Plant Ecology Lab for the Spring 2013 semester. We are seeking students interested in graduate research investigating fire ecology and carbon cycling in the Greater Everglades watershed through US Geological Survey and US Department of Energy-funded projects. Research in the Plant Ecology Lab focuses on the influence of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on plant community structure and ecosystem carbon cycling in peatlands from the Everglades to Alaska, providing opportunity for synergistic activities with other on-going research projects. Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree in biology, ecology, hydrology, or a related field (currently or prior to enrollment). Successful candidates must demonstrate an aptitude for research and the ability to work independently. Prior research experience in fire ecology, carbon cycling and/or plant ecology is preferred, as is the ability to conduct rigorous fieldwork in remote settings. A current, valid U.S. driver's license and good driving record is preferred. Consideration of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. The application deadline for the Environmental Sciences Master's Program is October 1. Interested applicants should send a copy of their CV or resume, GPA and GRE scores, a written statement of graduate research interest, and names and contact information for two references via email to Dr. Brian Benscoter (bbenscot@fau.edu). Posted: 9/25/12.

Florida International University: Three PhD graduate assistantship are available in the Department of Biological Sciences to conduct research in the Everglades, beginning Fall 2013. These positions are affiliated with the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research program and will include integrative field and experimental research approaches, and public outreach. FIU is a public research university in Miami with a highly diverse, vibrant, and growing student body located near the edge of the Everglades. The Department of Biological Sciences has strengths in Everglades, Caribbean, and Tropical Ecology. The FCE LTER student organization, based at FIU, is a very active community of over 70 students from multiple departments and institutions who conduct integrative, multidisciplinary, long-term research. To be eligible for positions, students must meet FIU graduate admission requirements and successfully compete for a teaching assistantship to match existing research assistantship support. Highly-qualified candidates may be eligible for fully-funded Presidential Fellowships. Interested candidates are encouraged to submit a letter of intent and CV by December 1, 2012. The deadline for graduate applications is January 15, 2013. Wetland Ecosystems: The candidate’s research interests should include freshwater ecology, especially metabolic demand and stoichiometry. The student will be expected to develop research related to understanding how nutrient concentrations and biological oxygen demand influence carbon cycling in coastal Everglades mangrove soils that are modified by sea level rise. Interested applicants should contact John Kominoski (jkominos@fiu.edu) before applying. Coastal Ecosystem Dynamics: The candidate’s research interests should include coastal ecosystem ecology, especially plant productivity and C dynamics. The student will be expected to develop research related to understanding how plant productivity, nutrient concentrations and salinity influence carbon cycling in coastal Everglades wetlands and landscape vegetation change. Interested applicants should contact Tiffany Troxler (troxlert@fiu.edu) before applying. Algal Ecology: The candidate’s research interests should include aquatic ecology, algal ecology, and/or paleoecology, in alignment with those of the algal ecology laboratory. The student will be expected to develop research related to understanding how benthic algal communities mediate carbon cycling in coastal Everglades wetlands, and how algal distribution and function may be modified by sea level rise. Interested applicants should contact Evelyn Gaiser (gaisere@fiu.edu) before applying. Posted: 11/5/12, revised: 11/7/12.

Florida International University: I am recruiting potential students for the Urban and Landscape Ecology Lab (Dr. John Withey) interested in a Ph.D. from the Department of Biological Sciences beginning in Fall 2013. To be eligible for positions, students must meet FIU graduate admission requirements and successfully compete for a teaching assistantship. Highly-qualified candidates may be eligible for fully-funded Presidential Fellowships. The deadline for graduate applications is January 15, 2013. Students interested in urban ecology, avian ecology, conservation biology and/or tropical ecology can look at my website for a description of my current and previous research. I have begun field studies of urban bird communities that use hardwood hammock fragments in South Florida and will be especially interested to discuss aspects of this research with potential students. I also expect to continue regional to continental-scale modeling work focused on the response of vertebrates to land-use and climate change. Students should expect to pursue integrated field and modeling research, and participate in education and public outreach. Previous experience with ArcGIS and any programming (especially R and/or Python) is a plus but not required. FIU is a public research university in Miami with a highly diverse, vibrant, and growing student body located near the edge of the Everglades. Biological Sciences is a research-intensive academic unit with an emphasis on educating broadly-trained life scientists. Ecology is a particular strength of the Department with over a dozen faculty active in ecological research and close ties to both the Florida Coastal Everglades LTER and the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. For a successful application, potential students should contact me directly before applying: jwithey@fiu.edu. Posted: 7/6/12, revised: 11/14/12.

Freie Universität Berlin: In the framework of the project B3 „Priming of plant defence by below- and aboveground herbivores“ (PI: Prof. Dr. Susanne Wurst) 2 PhD positions for the duration of 4 years (2012-2016) are offered in the working group Functional Biodiversity. One PhD investigates the impact of root herbivores (insect larvae and nematodes) on the defence of Solanaceae model plants (Solanum dulcamara und Nicotiana attenuata) against aboveground herbivores (insects and snails). The second PhD will focus on the effects of aboveground herbivores on the defence of the plants against root herbivores. Both field and greenhouse experiments will be conducted to elucidate the natural succession of herbivores on the plants and the consequences for plant defence with special emphasis on priming mechanisms. The plant defence reactions will be analysed by HPLC and GC-MS, the data statistically analysed and the results published in international journals and presented on conferences. Requirements: Master or Diploma degree in Biology, Ecology or Agroecology. Special Requirements: Background knowledge in Ecology (especially in plant-insect-interactions, chemical ecology, and/or soil ecology), experience with analytical methods (HPLC and GC-MS) and the conduct and statistical analysis of ecological experiments are requested. Very good English skills, high motivation and engagement, ability to work independently and in a team, the readiness to learn new methods and theories, and an open and friendly personality are expected. Please send your application (letter of motivation, CV, certificates, 2 references) by 19 July 2012 to: Prof. Dr. Susanne Wurst, Freie Universität Berlin, AG Funktionelle Biodiversität, Königin-Luise-Str. 12-16, 14195 Berlin. E-Mail: s.wurst@fu-berlin.de. Posted: 7/11/12.

Georg-August-Universität Göttingen: The Department of Plant Ecology and Ecosystem Research is looking to fill the position of a PhD Student. The position is funded for three years and includes full benefits. This position should be filled as soon as possible. Salary: Pay grade 50 % TV-L 13 (~1100 €/month, full benefits). The PhD project will investigate the mediation of the tree-soil feedback by symbiotic root associations (arbuscular mycorrhizae, ectomycorrhizae) as influenced by increasing N availability and intensity of summer droughts under global change. We will examine how diverse microbial communities influence root longevity, exudation and absorption processes of forest trees in an interdisciplinary research approach. Modern methods will be part of the research, e.g., in situ root exudate collection, root observations by mini-rhizotron imaging and stable isotope labeling. Hypotheses will be tested with a combination of field investigations in a mixed forest stand (National Park) in Central Germany and experimental analyses with controlled conditions in a rhizotron (Göttingen Rhizolab). Goettingen is one of the highest-ranked universities in Germany with a high international reputation. A major research field of the Faculty of Biology is biodiversity and ecology. The associated PhD Program Biodiversity and Ecology offers excellent opportunities for students to obtain a PhD degree in a 3-years graduate program. Requirements: Applicants should have a very good master or diploma degree in biology, forestry, environmental sciences, geosciences, soil sciences, or a related discipline. Candidates with laboratory research experience in biogeochemistry and experience with isotopic labeling are preferred. Fieldwork experience in ecological sciences is desirable. We are looking for an outstanding candidate, who is highly motivated, team orientated and willing to work precisely. Advanced command of English is required; willingness to acquire at least some basic German is desirable. Please send your application including a letter of motivation, research experience, CV, and (if available) copies of publications by June 17, 2013, to Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Department of Plant Ecology and Ecosystem Research, “Rhizosphere”, Dr. I.C. Meier, Untere Karspüle 2, 37073 Göttingen, Germany, e-mail: imeier1@uni-goettingen.de If you have any questions, please contact Dr. I.C. Meier, phone: +49-551-39-5712, e-mail: +49-551-39-5701. Posted: 6/3/13.

George Mason University/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute: we are pleased to announce the availability of Doctoral Fellowships in Conservation Biology. Two fellowships are being offered starting the fall of 2013 for students with an M.S. in conservation biology or a related field whose research interests coincide with SCBI scientists. Prospective candidates must qualify for admission to the Ph.D. program in Environmental Science and Public Policy at George Mason. Support will be provided for four years with a stipend of $24k/year and tuition remission for a defined number of credits. Major support in the first two years will be from a teaching assistantship with reduced load from George Mason. In the final two years major support will be provided by the Smithsonian through research mentorship with a specific SCBI scientist who must support the candidate's fellowship application. More details (.docx) on the program and how to apply. Review of applications will begin January 7, 2013. Posted: 11/1/12.

George Washington University: We are looking for a graduate student to join our plant evolutionary ecology research group, beginning fall semester 2013. Support is available for a student to participate in an NSF-funded project, which examines the influences of plant traits on wood decay. We are exploring how plant traits relate to community structure and function of decomposing fungi, and the consequences of these interactions for the forest carbon cycle in the Central and Eastern USA and Eastern Australia as climate changes. The research assistant would focus on wood decay and fungal culturing and identification, using both traditional techniques (field collection and culturing) and molecular methods (targeted sequencing and next-generation based metagenomics). The student would have opportunities to spend time in collaborating labs that specialize on fungal identification, enzyme analysis and genomics. Motivated students with interests or skills in mycology, molecular biology, and bioinformatics are especially encouraged to apply. The student would join an interactive lab group that broadly focuses on plant structure and function (anatomy and physiological ecology), community ecology, and evolutionary ecology, both in the temperate and tropical areas. We have strong links to area institutions, including the Smithsonian. GWU is located in the heart of DC, with easy access to numerous science, conservation, and policy based institutions. Washington, DC is a dynamic city with a wealth of ecologists and evolutionary biologists. If you are interested in working with us on the NSF project (or on other projects broadly related to the lab interests), please send an email to me (Amy Zanne: aezanne@gmail.com) with brief details about your GPA, GRE, research interests, experience, and why you want to go to graduate school. For information about applying to the program, go to the Department of Biological Sciences website. The application deadline is 2 January 2013. Posted: 12/3/12.

Georgia Southern University: A MS Graduate Assistantship is available in the Department of Biology for a highly motivated student to conduct forest ecophysiological research at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center at Ichauway beginning summer or fall of 2013. The student’s research interests should focus on plant ecophysiology, ecosystem ecology, or disturbance ecology. The project will focus on improving our understanding of stored carbon dynamics among different plant functional groups in response to fire. The student selected for this assistantship will be co-advised by Dr. Doug Aubrey (GSU) and Dr. Robert J. Mitchell (Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center). The first half of their program will be in residence at the Jones Center to perform their research and the second half of their program will be at Georgia Southern University to complete their coursework. This is a fully funded assistantship that includes: stipend, a small research budget, and housing while in residence at the Jones Center. The student will be on a research assistantship while in residence at the Jones Center and on a teaching assistantship while at Georgia Southern. Interested students should send a single pdf file containing: your CV (including contact information for references), college transcripts (unofficial transcripts are fine), GRE scores, and a brief statement of your general research interests and experiences to Dr. Doug P. Aubrey or contact Dr. Aubrey for more details (daubrey@georgiasouthern.edu). A BS in plant biology, ecology, or related field is required. Prior research experience (both field and lab related) is preferred. Posted: 2/27/13.

German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research: 6 Ph.D. Positions at iDiv in Leipzig, Germany. iDiv is one of the seven National Research Centres funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). It is located in the city of Leipzig and jointly hosted by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU),the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (FSU), the University of Leipzig (UL), and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ).It is supported by the Max Planck Society, the Leibniz Association, the Klaus Tschira Foundation and the Free State of Saxony. One of the central missions of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research is the promotion of theory-driven synthesis and data-driven theory in biodiversity sciences. The concept of iDiv encompasses the detection of biodiversity, understanding its emergence, exploring its consequences for ecosystem functions and services, and developing strategies to safeguard biodiversity under global change. Outstanding students of all nationalities are invited to apply for doctoral fellowships on:. Importance of mutualistic interactions for current and future patterns of plant and bird diversity in the tropical Andes . Ecological Modelling of Genetic Diversity in Plant Communities . Apiculture and the pollinator decline: A model for pathogen driven biodiversity risks . Mapping genetic and species diversity of pollinators to the ecosystem service of pollination across changing landscapes . Accelerated Evolution in Chromosomal Rearrangements and Speciation in Lacertid Lizards . Plant Physiology/Biospectroscopy In the active research environment of iDiv, PhD students will be embedded in the Young Biodiversity Research Training Group (yDiv). The goal of yDiv is to educate a new generation of scientists in transdisciplinary biodiversity research, who will have gained expertise both in experimental as well as theoretical fields of research. Fellows will attend lectures and seminars on a broad range of topics in the field of biodiversity science and conduct their research in a modern, international and integrative working environment. The working language is English. Each doctoral fellow receives individual supervision and mentoring and is guided in her/his research work by a PhD advisory committee. Application: We promote a research environment free of gender bias. Severely disabled persons are encouraged to apply and are preferred in the case of equal suitability. Applicants should hold a MSc or equivalent degree in biology or a related discipline. Applications are in English and should be sent before January 18, 2013. A detailed description of each position and the respective application address can be found under http://www.idiv-biodiversity.de/. Posted: 1/2/13.

Griffith University: Ph.D. Project - Models to Predict Hendra Virus Prevalence in Fruit Bat Populations. An international research team has recently been awarded funding by the National Hendra Virus Program to develop models to predict and understand the dynamics of Hendra virus infection in fruit bat populations. The team, led by Prof Hamish McCallum, Head of theGriffith School of Environment, includes Prof Peter Hudson, FRS and Dr. Raina Plowright from the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics at Pennsylvania State University and Dr. Peter Daszak and Dr. Jon Epstein from the Ecohealth Alliance in New York. The project will be able to support at least one Ph.D. student based at Griffith University. This will be an exciting opportunity for suitable students develop research skills in the rapidly growing area of disease ecology, applied to an important wildlife and public health problem. The project will be developed following negotiation between potential students and ProfMcCallum, and will primarily involve modelling and data analysis, possibly associated with some collection of field data. There will be the opportunity for travel to Penn State during the candidature. Suitable candidates will either be biologists with strong quantitative skills, or mathematics graduates with an interest in developing applications to ecology. Interested students will need to apply for a Griffith University Ph.D. scholarship. Candidates with the equivalent of an Australian first-class honours degree (i.e. at least four years undergraduate training, including at least one semester of research project, with very good results) have a very high chance of receiving a scholarship. Australian or New Zealand residents do not pay Ph.D. tuition fees. International students will also need to apply for a Griffith tuition fee scholarship. Those with very good academic records are likely to be awarded a scholarship. Applications for the next round of Griffith scholarships close on October 8. In the first instance, interested students should contact Hamish McCallum H.McCallum@griffith.edu.au well before the closing date. Posted: 9/10/12.

Idaho State University: Plant Physiological Ecology/Ecohydrology of Sagebrush Steppe Vegetation. A M.S. position is available in the Reinhardt Lab to investigate the impacts of altered hydroclimate (precipitation seasonality) on sagebrush steppe plant physiological ecology/ecohydrology. This EPSCoR-supported field-based project will involve quantifying changes in plant carbon and/or water relations among experimentally-altered precipitation treatments across scales (leaf-organism-plot), and will take place on an existing long-term (18+ years) ecohydrological experiment on the Idaho National Laboratory. We seek applicants with a B.S. in plant ecology or plant ecophysiology, and preference will go to those with previous research experience. The successful applicant will use both standard ecophysiological instrumentation (e.g., gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, pressure bomb apparatus, etc.), and innovative, novel techniques to quantify differences in carbon or water relations among precipitation treatments. We are particularly interested in applicants who have previous, hands on experience collecting gas exchange or sap flux measurements. Applicants should be able to work in field settings, sometimes under harsh conditions (hot, arid conditions typical of the northern Great Basin). Pocatello, Idaho offers an outstanding quality of life, with a low cost of living and endless outdoor recreation opportunities. The graduate stipend is ~$18K/year, and includes payment of tuition and fees. Funding is available for two years. Applicants should provide a cover letter detailing their interest in the position, a CV/resume, contact information for three references, and unofficial transcripts and GRE scores to Dr. Keith Reinhardt, reinkeit@isu.edu. Review of applications begins immediately. Posted: 10/23/12.

Indiana University: The Phillips lab invites applications to our Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (EEB) Ph.D. Program. We welcome inquiries from motivated students interested in how regional and global environmental changes influence carbon and nutrient cycling across spatial and temporal scales. Our lab is a collaborative, highly interactive and dynamic group, with broad interests in plant eco-physiology, ecosystem ecology, microbial ecology and soil biogeochemistry. Incoming Ph.D. students are encouraged to develop their own research projects in these areas. The EEB Program at IU is one of the top-ranked programs nationally, with a high concentration of faculty working in the area of plant-soil-microbial interactions. Ph.D. students in EEB have opportunities for interdisciplinary training in atmospheric chemistry, biophysical ecology, climate-ecosystem interactions, land use and land cover change, microbial ecology and remote sensing. IU has outstanding resources for conducting ecological research, including a state of the art biogeochemistry lab, an AmeriFlux eddy covariance tower and thousands of acres of nearby forest. Interested applicants should email Dr. Phillips as soon as possible as the deadline for domestic and international applications is Dec. 1, 2012. In your email, include “Ph.D. opportunity” in the subject line, and provide a brief statement of your current and/or future research interests (please be as specific as you can) and a curriculum vitae. Posted: 9/10/12.

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis: The Ecohydrology and Biogeochemistry lab seeks two motivated MS or PhD candidates working on ecohydrologic observations (field based studies), modelling and/or water-nitrogen interactions starting in Fall 2013. The essential question is how environmental changes influence water and nutrient cycling in different ecosystems. Research experience in one or more of the following areas is preferred: Biogeochemistry, Ecology, Isotope geochemistry, Soil Science and Environmental Sciences. The knowledge and expertise in stable isotopes (2H, 18O and 15N) is desirable. Graduate study experience and published scientific results are a plus. The department has a wide variety of analytical facilities including LGR and Picarro water isotope analyzers, IRMS facility, wet chemistry lab suitable for a wide range of soil, water and plant chemical analyses. The support for the position(s) will be a combination of teaching and research assistantships. To apply, please send a copy of your application materials (statement of interest, resume, unofficial transcripts and GRE score, TOEFL score (if applicable) and contact information of three referees) to Dr. Lixin Wang (lxwang@iupui.edu). Review of applications will start immediately and continue until the positions are filled. Please feel free to contact Dr. Lixin Wang for additional information or questions. More information, including application procedure: Earth Science graduate program. Posted: 10/15/12.

INRA-University of Burgundy: PhD position in Microbial ecology in the group of L. Philippot Location: Dijon (1.5 h from Paris), France. Supervisor: Dr L. Philippot and Dr. A. Spor. Molecular analyses of denitrifier community ecology. Large variations in N2O emissions are often reported in relation to land use and management practices. However, abiotic variables alone do not explain such variability and despite intensive studies of the ecology of the nitrogen-cycling microbial communities involved in these emissions, the importance of the abundance and diversity of soil microorganisms remains largely unknown. Denitrifiers comprise a broad range of taxonomically diverse microorganisms not only capable to produce but also to reduce the greenhouse gas N2O. Thus, our objective will be to understand to which extent the denitrifier community composition is important for N2O emissions. Here, the distribution of the denitrifier community will be analyzed in soil samples collected at different experimental sites where /in situ/ N2O measurements are available. We will use routine assays to quantify the abundances of the denitrifiers by real-time PCR and cutting-edge techniques (454 pyrosequencing) already mastered in the lab to assess their diversity. Potential denitrification and N2O reduction will also be evaluated in the laboratory using gas chromatography. Various analyses will be undertaken to integrate soil properties, microbiological data and N2O flux.Altogether, this project will provide insights into the relative contribution of biotic and abiotic factors to the production and reduction of N2O in relation to land use and management practices. We will explore the possibility to use this knowledge for identifying sustainable farming systems with greenhouse gas mitigation opportunities. The PhD student will work in a performing and dynamic team including several researchers, students, postdocs and technicians. As a PhD student in NORA, you will also be part of a strong network of leading scientists at universities and private companies in several European countries. PhD courses organized by NORA will provide teaching by experts in microbial molecular ecology, biochemistry and mathematical modelling and will also include complementary training such as scientific and popular writing, entrepreneurship, IPR and management. The candidate should have a strong interest in environmental microbiology and a MSc degree in microbiology, ecology, molecular biology or a related field. Ideally, the candidate is acquainted with, or has experience in molecular biology and techniques. The candidate should be both independentand capable to interact with the team members. Fluency in English is required. To stimulate mobility, the EU rules for Marie Curie Training networks say that you must not have resided, worked or studied in the country of the host institution (France) for more than 12 months in the 3 years prior to the time of recruitment (short stays are not taken into account). Applications include CV, transcripts, diplomas, and the special NORA Application form. More information about eligibility rules and how to apply: http://nora.umb.no/fellowships. Call for applications closes 17 June 2013. Posted: 5/28/13.

Iowa State University: I am recruiting a graduate student (M.S. or PhD if masters degree is already in hand) for a research project involving characterization of insect flight behavior using laboratory flight mill systems. I am a Research Entomologist with USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Corn Insects and Crop Genetics Research Unit, with a courtesy faculty appointment in the Department of Entomology at Iowa State in Ames. My laboratory is located on the ISU campus. Our group's mission is to study the population ecology, genetics, and behavior of corn insect pests, and my interests are mainly in the realm of dispersal, migration, and gene flow. The graduate student will work with at least two pest insects. The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a chrysomelid beetle and the worst pest of corn in North America. It also is spreading in Europe as an invasive species. It recently has developed resistance in the Midwestern U.S. to a particular type of transgenic Bt corn, with many implications for farmers, industry, public-sector scientists, and government regulators. Characterization of long-distance movement of WCR adults is critical to understanding the dynamics of resistance evolution and spread of resistance in this insect. The grad student's main project would be to investigate and compare flight behaviors of resistant and wild-type WCR using laboratory flight mills. In addition, the western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta, is a noctuid moth pest of corn that has undergone a recent range expansion out of the Great Plains to the East Coast. The trigger for the expansion is unknown, and almost nothing is known about this species' flight capacity and behavior. Recent establishment of a laboratory colony will allow flight mill studies. It will be a demanding project requiring attention to detail, perseverance (especially in the beginning when learning to tether insects to the flight mills), and critical thinking. The information gained for both species will be of immediate interest to the scientific community and of ultimate benefit to corn growers. There will be room for additional side projects as well depending on the student's interests and talents. Pending final approval of funding (anticipated), this will be a research assistantship, including stipend and tuition, for 2.5 – 3 years. Start date: as soon as practicable, but preferably no later than mid-August 2013. If interested, please send to me: 1) a cover letter describing your background in science, career goals, and research interests; 2) your C.V.; 3) contact information for three references; 4) copy of transcripts; and 5) GRE scores. Please send to Tom.Sappington@ars.usda.gov . Screening will begin immediately, and continue until the position is filled. Posted: 4/19/13.

Iowa State University: Graduate student (MS and PhD) positions are available in the Abbott lab. We use mathematical models to answer questions about the drivers of population dynamics and spatial pattern in ecology. Recent and ongoing work in the lab focuses on effects of dispersal, the role of environmental heterogeneity and environmental stochasticity, and impacts of climate change on interacting species. A range of other research topics would also fit in well, as long as there's an emphasis on using mathematical approaches to answering ecological questions. Interested students are encouraged to contact me (kcabbott@iastate.edu) to discuss possible research directions and opportunities for support. More information: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology graduate program. Karen Abbott (kcabbotttoc@yahoo.com), Assistant Professor, Ecology, Evolution & Organismal Biology. Posted: 11/19/12.

Iowa State University: A graduate assistantship (M.S. or Ph.D.) is available in the area of agroecosystem ecology and management. Research focus is flexible, potentially integrating: crop production, ecosystem modeling, hydrology, and soil biogeochemistry with emphasis on coupled C/N dynamics. As part of the USDA-funded Climate and Corn-based Systems Coordinated Agricultural Project, the student will work with a multi-institution team of scientists to develop agroecosystems that are environmentally and economically sustainable in a changing climate. Degrees can be earned through the Agronomy and Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Departments as well as interdepartmental programs in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Science, and Sustainable Agriculture. Prospective applicants should contact Drs. Mike Castellano and Matt Helmers. Start date in January or May 2013. Posted: 9/6/12.

Iowa State University: We seek a highly motivated and qualified individual wishing to pursue an M.S. or Ph.D. degree in sustainable agriculture. The successful applicant will conduct research in the areas of ecosystem service modeling and agricultural stakeholder engagement. In addition to working with ISU scientists, the successful applicant will also work with members of Environmental Defense Fund’s Right Practice – Right Place Project and the Natural Capital Project. Required qualifications include a passion for agriculture, a strong background in the environmental or social sciences, some previous research experience, and an ability to work in a collaborative environment. Preferred qualifications include strong backgrounds in BOTH the environmental AND social sciences, some experience with systems science and modeling, work on water, strong quantitative skills, and demonstrated team skills. A beginning Graduate Research Assistantship includes a stipend of $19k per year, plus benefits. Start date is negotiable, but early January 2013 is preferred. To receive full consideration, submit applications by Oct. 1, 2012; however, applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Interested individuals should provide the following materials: (1) letter of interest stating professional goals, research interests, and qualifications for the position, (2) a resume, (3) transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial copies acceptable at present), and (4) the names, affiliations, email addresses, and phone numbers of three references. For further information on the project or application contact Lisa Schulte Moore (lschulte@iastate.edu) or John Tyndall (jtyndall@iastate.edu). Posted: 8/15/12.

The Jena Experiment: 9 Ph.D.-positions in Functional Biodiversity Research. The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) and the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) fund a large-scale grassland project "The Jena Experiment" on the relationship between Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (Grant FOR 1451). On a 10ha field site in Jena, more than 470 grassland plots have been established where plant diversity is manipulated to measure the effect of diversity on multi-trophic interactions and nutrient cycling. Please check the website of the Jena Experiment for the following job announcements: Ph.D.-positions in Functional Biodiversity Research (TVL E13 65% or equivalent in Switzerland) in a number of subject areas. The project is an international collaborative research effort of 11 universities and research institutes in Germany, three universities in Switzerland, two in The Netherlands as well as universities and research institutes in Austria, France and Canada. All Ph.D.-students will benefit from an already existing experimental set up and the interaction with other PhDs and researchers in an international research team. The ability to speak and write German will be appreciated but is not indispensable for candidates fluent in English. Ph.D.-students will be based at the university advertising the position but all field work will be conducted in Jena, Germany. Selection of applicants starts 20 May 2013 and continues until positions are filled. Applications (motivation letter, CV including publication list if applicable, addresses of 2 references and/or reference letters), preferably by email as /single /PDF attachment with the subject "PhD in the Jena Experiment", should be submitted to the contact person given on the webpage. 2 PhD positions in Plant Population Ecology in Halle/Saale (Germany) and Bern (Switzerland); 1 PhD positions in Soil Ecology (Goettingen); 1 PhD position in Community Ecology (Oldenburg); 1 PhD-position in vegetation science and digital image analysis (Leipzig); 2 PhD-positions in Plant Root Ecology (Leipzig, Wageningen); 1 Phd-position in Biodiversity-N cycle relationship (Bern). Posted: 5/7/13.

The Jena Experiment: Ph.D.-positions in Biodiversity Research. The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) funds a large-scale grassland project “The Jena Experiment” on the relationship between Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (Grant FOR 1451). On a 10ha field site in Jena, more than 470 grassland plots have been established where plant diversity is manipulated to measure the effect of diversity on multi-trophic interactions and nutrient cycling. The following Ph.D.-positions (TVL E13 65%) are available to work in the Jena Experiment: 2 PhD positions in Soil Animal Ecology (Göttingen, Jena), 1 PhD position in Community Ecology (Oldenburg), 1 Ph.D.-position in Vegetation Science and Digital Image Analysis (Leipzig), 1 Ph.D.-position in Pollination Ecology (Freiburg), 1 PhD position in Plant-Insect Interactions (Munich). The project is an international collaborative research effort of 11 universities and research institutes in Germany, three universities in Switzerland, two in The Netherlands as well as universities and research institutes in Austria, France and Canada. All Ph.D.-students will benefit from an already existing experimental set up and the interaction with other PhDs and researchers in an international research team. The ability to speak and write German will be appreciated but is not indispensable for candidates fluent in English. Ph.D.-students will be based at the university advertising the position but all field work will be conducted in Jena, Germany. A full description of the project and more details about the positions can be found under: www.the-jena-experiment.de Selection of applicants starts 10. April 2013 and continues until positions are filled. Applications (motivation letter, CV including publication list if applicable, addresses of 2 references and/or reference letters), preferably by email as single PDF attachment with the subject “PhD in the Jena Experiment”, should be submitted to the contact person given below. 2 PhD positions in Soil Animal Ecology The Animal Ecology Group of the Georg August University Göttingen and the Aboveground–Belowground Interactions Group of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena offer two PhD positions to work on the project “Interactions between plant diversity and soil invertebrates”. The project explores the role of soil invertebrates for ecosystem functioning in grassland systems of different diversity. One PhD student (located in Göttingen) will investigate the long-term effects of plant diversity on soil organisms as well as the relevance of the bacterial and fungal decomposition channels in structuring soil food webs via fatty acid analyses. The second PhD (located in Jena) will study effects of plant trait diversity on soil microbial biomass, meso-and macrofauna. 13C pulse labeling and the analysis of root exudates in a complementary greenhouse experiment target at studying C flow in soil food webs and plant traits mediating underlying effects. The applicants should be trained in animal ecology and experimental ecology. Knowledge on soil ecology and soil invertebrates is advantageous. 1 PhD position in Community Ecology At the Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM) at the Carl-von-Ossietzky University Oldenburg, a PhD Student will work on the chemical composition of plants along the diversity gradient and the ecological stoichiometry of interactions between herbivores, pollinators and plants. The PhD student is expected to sample, measure and analyse plant and insect chemical composition and lead the scientific dissemination of the results. The collaborative project requires active participation in the establishment, conduction and sampling of the main experiment as well as in the common scientific activities, which requires recurring stays in Jena. We are searching for highly motivated candidates having an excellent diploma or master degree in biology, ecology, or environmental science. We expect a strong interest in general ecological questions and great enthusiasm for scientific work. Contact: Prof. Dr. Helmut Hillebrand, Carl-von-Ossietzky University Oldenburg, ICBM, Schleusenstrasse 1, 26382 Wilhelmshaven, Email hillebrand@icbm.de. 1 Ph.D.-position in vegetation science and digital image analysis A PhD based at the department of Botany and Functional Biodiversity Research of the Institute of Biology at the University of Leipzig will focus on elucidating the role of phenological and architectural diversity and identity of plant species for ecosystem functioning in grasslands. The project will use a combination of fine-scale canopy inventories and digital photography (time-lapse and close range) to acquire high temporal and spatial resolution datasets in the trait-based experiment (TBE). The selected candidate should have an excellent Master’s degree (or an equivalent) in a relevant field such as botany, ecology, biogeochemistry, geosciences or computer sciences. Experience in one or several of the fields of vegetation analysis, statistics, and image analysis is necessary. Good programming skills are indispensable. Good use of spoken and written English, ambition to publish in international journals as well as creativity, enthusiasm and endurance is expected. The project will be carried out in close collaboration with the groups of Prof. Nina Buchmann from ETH Zurich and Prof. Raphael Proulx form UQTR Troix-Rivieres, Canada. Geographical mobility is necessary and a driving license will be a plus. Contact: Prof. Christian Wirth, Universität Leipzig, Institut für Biologie, AG Spezielle Botanik und Funktionelle Biodiversität, Johannisallee 21-23, 04103 Leipzig. E-mail: cwirth@uni-leipzig.de. 1 Ph.D.-position in Pollination Ecology The new Chair of Nature Conservation and Landscape Ecology (currently Ecosystem functioning group) at the University of Freiburg invites applications for a PhD research position as part of the subproject “Aboveground plant-insect interaction webs and associated processes along a plant diversity gradient” lead by Prof. Dr. Alexandra-Maria Klein (University of Lüneburg until June 2013, afterwards University of Freiburg) and Dr. Christoph Scherber (University of Göttingen). The overall aim of the thesis is to better understand how plant species loss affects aboveground plant-insect interactions and the functioning of pollinators in grasslands. The methodological approaches will include pollination experiments, observations of flower-visiting insects to analyze plant-pollinator interactions networks and to link the pollinator networks to interaction networks of other aboveground and belowground organisms. Stoichiometric mismatches of pollinators when plant functional groups and species get lost will be studied by conducting chemical analyses to determine the quantity and ratios of different elements and of sugars and amino-acids in nectar and pollen. The experiments will be carried out in strong collaboration with other members and students of the research group. The position will be based at the University in Freiburg in the new Faculty of Environment and Natural Resources. Contact: Prof. Dr. Alexandra-Maria Klein, Institute of Ecology, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg Germany, phone: 0049-(0)4131-677-2960, fax: 0049-(0)4131-677-2949. 1 PhD position in plant-insect interactions The Terrestrial Ecology Research Group of the Technische Universität München offers one PhD position to work on plant-insect interactions and the role of insects for ecosystem processes within the framework of The Jena-Experiment. The project explores how plant diversity affects communities of aboveground arthropods, in particular insects, and studies a number of processes affected by insects, e.g. herbivory. The student will be able to conduct long-term analyses based on own data and data collected in the previous years. Applicants should be trained in animal ecology and experimental ecology. Plant identification skills and experience in working with insects are desirable. Experience in field work and statistical analysis (e.g. R, mixed effect models, structural equation modeling) is a strong plus. It is expected that the student will spent most of the summer time in Jena (April to September) and the winter at TUM. Contact: Prof. Dr. Wolfgang W. Weisser, Terrestrial Ecology Research Group, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Center for Food and Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, Phone: 0049 8161 71 3495, Fax 0049 8161 71 4427. Applications and pre-application enquiries should be sent to wolfgang.weisser@tum.de. Posted: 3/19/13.

John Carroll University: The Department of Biology is accepting applications for funded teaching assistantships in various areas of Biology at the master’s level. The Anthony/Hickerson research lab anticipates one opening beginning in fall of 2013. Funding includes a full tuition waiver and competitive stipend. Drs. Anthony and Hickerson have two distinct research areas: 1) We are interested in how ecological factors such as mate choice, aggression, territoriality, and diet interact in the divergence of sympatric populations. 2) We are also interested in how terrestrial amphibians interact with large invertebrates (e.g. centipedes, spiders, earthworms) in temperate forest floor food webs. Recent publications from our lab can be found on Dr. Carl Anthony’s and Dr. Cari Hickerson’s academia.edu websites. If you are interested in applying, please contact Carl Anthony (canthony@jcu.edu) or Cari Hickerson (chickerson@jcu.edu) directly by 15 February. Please include your interests and relevant experience in your email. Posted: 1/24/13.

Justus-Liebig-University Giessen: We are seeking a highly motivated individual to join an interdisciplinary research group that is quantitatively and qualitatively analyzing biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes in Germany and Japan. The core task for the successful candidate will be to quantify ecosystem functions and services. Therefore, the successful candidate will first focus on analyzing abiotic environmental variables such as water and soil components and processes, which are relevant for provisioning and regulating ecosystem services. Here, different modeling tools will be developed and adapted. The experience with Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and with integrating modeling frameworks, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool SWAT, is wanted. Moreover, soil-related ecosystem functions and service will be modeled. For this purpose, the successful candidate needs a vision of multiple functional soil properties that are relevant for regulating and provisioning services. A first focus will be on the relevant indicators for land use / land cover change. In a second step, a meta-analysis of the yet obtained model outputs will be done. For this purpose, adapted and validated models of ecosystem functions, economics and biodiversity will be integrated into a modeling framework. Input and output parameters will be combined within a common objective function, which then, in turn, will be optimized and maximized. Optimization of land-use types and land-use intensities relating to defined and allocated service providing units (SPU) in the landscape will be depicted in discrete functions. Finally, the workflow of the modeling and the optimization procedures and the obtained results will be adequately documented and communicated to stakeholder communities. As the work includes active collaboration with related working groups, speaking english and (willingness to learn) german is a must for efficiently communicating. We collaborate with partner projects in Japan, and willingness to travel is expected. Requirements: -Master’s degree or equivalent in ecological informatics, geo-ecology, ecology or comparable qualification. -Good work experiences with GIS and integrating tools like SWAT -Excellent statistical skills -Programming skills in R, Java or comparable skills -Strong background in the ecological sciences. Full-time position, salary is based on 50% TV-H E13. Start date: 1 January 2013. Duration: 30 months. For further information, please contact: Fred Jopp (fred.jopp@bio.uni-giessen.de), Department of Animal Ecology. To apply, please send your CV, including a short summary of your motivation, and the names and contact addresses of two references to PD Dr. Fred Jopp (fred.jopp@bio.uni-giessen.de), Department of Animal Ecology. Posted: 12/13/12.

Justus-Liebig-University Giessen: a PhD position in Plant Invasion Ecology is available within the recently established Plant Ecology, Geoecology, and Modelling Department within the Institute for Plant Ecology, . This position is available for three years, with the possibility of an extension for additional two years (more information). Tasks: This project aims at improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying biological invasions by alien plant species, at the community level. Specifically, we are interested in evaluating (1) the role of climate change, nitrification, and salt tolerance, in regulating species invasiveness and plant community invasibility, and/or (2) the impact of invasive plant species on resident plant communities and ecosystem functioning, based on abundance, phylogenetic, and traits data for plants. These research questions will be addressed using a combination of laboratory, greenhouse and field experiments, field observations and sample collection. Additional duties include teaching (2 h/week according to state law). The candidate should show independent research thinking and good communication skills. English is the working language. Applications for this position (reference number 608/02884/08), including a cover letter, with details of your specific qualifications for the project, a copy of your curriculum vitae, as well as contact details for at least two references, should be sent by the 16th November 2012 to the Präsidenten der Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Erwin-Stein-Gebäude, Goethestrasse 58, 35390 Giessen, Germany. An electronic copy of your application and informal inquiries should be directed to Prof. Margherita Gioria, e-mail: margherita.gioria@bot2.bio.unigiessen.de (Phone: +49-(0)641-99-35326). Starting date: negotiable, but ideally by February 2013. Posted: 11/1/12.

Kent State University: Multiple graduate research assistantships (MS or PhD) are available in the Lutz Laboratory in the Department of Biology. Our research group seeks to understand biogeochemical and ecosystem processes in a broad variety of contexts, incorporating diverse research strategies including empirical data collection, data synthesis, and modeling. Motivated graduate students with interests in the following topics are encouraged to apply: (1) assessing the environmental impacts of energy extraction practices, such as hydraulic fracturing and surface coal mining; (2) investigating watershed carbon and nutrient cycles in both natural and human impacted settings; and (3) studying urban eco-hydrology in the post-industrial landscape of Northeast Ohio and throughout the Great Lakes region. Incoming students, particularly at the PhD level, are expected to develop independent research questions within one of these areas. Students with undergraduate degrees outside of the environmental or natural sciences are equally encouraged to apply. Interested applicants should email Dr. Lutz (blutz6@kent.edu), providing a brief but specific statement of future research interests and curriculum vitae. Applications received by February 15 will receive full consideration. Posted: 1/24/13.

King's College, London: Remote Sensing of Carbon, Crops, Biomass Burning, Fire Weather and/or Smoke Spectroscopy & Chemistry. The opportunity has arisen for a fully-funded PhD student to work on a research project within the team in the Department of Geography at King's College London, working with Prof. Martin Wooster and Dr. James Millington. The studentship will focus on aspects of Earth Observation related to Carbon, Biomass Burning, Fire Weather and/or Smoke Spectroscopy & Chemistry, and will likely include periods of fieldwork in addition to satellite and in situ data analysis. See wildfire.geog.kcl.ac.uk for examples of the group’s work. An alternative project is also possible in the field of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) 'drone' remote sensing for improving agricultural field trials, in this case with substantial external UK collaboration. Only UK citizens are eligible for this NERC funding. We welcome candidates with a strong background in any aspect of physical science, engineering, geography or maths, ideally with some knowledge of remote sensing/Earth Observation. This opportunity has become available at short notice due to a previously selected candidate being offered a full-time permanent position elsewhere. The studentship must therefore be filled very quickly, but will be awarded in competition and interested candidates should have a 2:1 or 1st class UG degree, and ideally a predicted or actual Distinction grade at Masters level. Contact: James Millington (james.millington@kcl.ac.uk). Posted: 4/25/13.

Landcare Research: We are seeking a PhD student with interests in macro-ecology, competition, evolution and phylogenetics to conduct research into the role of priority effects in plant lineage diversification in New Zealand. The three-year project is part of a new Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fund grant led by Prof. Bill Lee at Landcare Research/University of Auckland/ University of Otago, based in Dunedin, New Zealand, in collaboration with Dr Peter Heenan (Landcare Research, Lincoln), Dr Tad Fukami (Stanford University, USA) and Dr Andrew Tanentzap (Queen Mary, University of London). Project description: Uneven diversification of plant lineages on islands is a central and unresolved question for understanding the origin of biodiversity. Recently it has been suggested that early colonisation events on islands drive radiations and suppress diversification of later-colonising lineages. We will test this hypothesis using the spectacular radiations in the New Zealand indigenous flora. Colonisation dates in New Zealand, derived from molecular phylogenetic studies, will be linked with results on plant features, competitive ability, and environmental and geographic range. These will be used to determine whether immigration timing has been important in driving rates of speciation on islands. The successful candidate will focus on the comparative plant trait analysis and experiments investigating competitive abilities of representative taxa from multiple lineages. The student will be involved in the design of these experiments and on how the data will be analysed and used in the phylogenetic framework proposed. The student will have access to training and support for establishing experiments and collecting and analysing data. We anticipate the student having a background in experimental ecology and phylogenetic analysis. The candidate will also have experience with statistical analyses and manipulating large datasets. The successful applicant will be expected to present results at local and international conferences and to lead publication of results. There will also be opportunities to interact with other researchers within Landcare Research, University of Auckland, University of Otago, Stanford University and Queen Mary, University of London. Landcare Research is New Zealand's foremost environmental research organisation specialising in sustainable management of terrestrial ecosystems and enhancing biodiversity. This position will be based at our Dunedin site and is fixed term for three years. The scholarship ($25,000 per year and associated fees) is fully funded by the Marsden Grant. To apply go to www.landcareresearch.co.nz/jobs. Please include your Curriculum Vitae, a cover letter, along with academic transcript, a sample of your written scientific work with the names of three referees. Applications will close on 1st May 2013. Posted: 4/5/13.

Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Ecology: Leibniz-ZMT GmbH in Bremen is a member of the Leibniz Association, which is supported by the German Federal and State Governments. Through its research, Leibniz-ZMT GmbH contributes to developing science-based strategies for sustainable use of tropical coastal systems. Leibniz-ZMT GmbH offers this position within the frame of the BMBF funded German- Indonesian SPICE III Program (Science for the Protection of Indonesian Coastal Ecosystems). The overarching goal of the bilateral SPICE Program is to address the scientific, social and economic issues related to the management of the Indonesian coastal ecosystems and their resources. In addition to strengthening the existing scientific data base on coastal ecosystems, the program promotes capacity and infrastructure building in the maritime sector in Indonesia and Germany and contributes to education and public awareness. The program is being carried out in cooperation among partners from several Indonesian and German universities and government research institutions. Research Assistant for a period of three years. Salary will be according to the German civil service remuneration system for a part time position (TV-L13, 50 %). The candidate will have the opportunity to do a doctorate at the University of Bremen. The candidate will develop a model on coral reef systems which contributes to the development and evaluation of management measures. The focus will be on the ecological dynamics in coral reef systems and human resource use and their effects on ecological processes and species composition under different environmental conditions. With this model it is intended to integrate data and knowledge from the other sub-projects in the SPICE project MaCoRAS. Requirements: - Master's or Diploma degree in a relevant topic - Experience in ecological modelling with a strong interest in individual/agent-based modelling. Good knowledge of a programming language (e.g. Java) is an asset - Familiarity with reef-ecological field work or human resource management - Good skills in English are essential. Please contact PD Dr. Hauke Reuter: hauke.reuter@zmt-bremen.de for details. To apply, please send a motivation letter, a complete CV with list of publications and skills, and names of two referees, with email addresses and phone numbers, in a single pdf-file to Dr. Hauke Reuter. Only short-listed candidates will be notified. The closing date is October 10th, 2012 or until a qualified candidate is identified. See the full job ad for more details. Posted: 9/18/12.

Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research: The IZW in Berlin is Germany’s premier wildlife research institute. The IZW focuses on the life histories and mechanisms of evolutionary adaptations of mammals and birds, their limits and their conservation in natural and anthropogenically influenced environments. For a major new interdisciplinary research initiative, funded through the Pact for Research and Innovation via the Leibniz Association, on “Gradual environmental change versus single catastrophe – identifying drivers of mammalian evolution” the IZW, together with its partner, the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)with expertise in the areas of climate change, climate policy and climate economics, and in collaboration with further institutions, offers the following positions: (1+2) 2 PhD positions in Evolutionary Genomics (IZW) (3) 1 PhD position in Stable Isotope Analysis and Evolutionary Genomics (IZW) (4) 1 PhD position in Nonlinear Analysis and Reconstruction of Palaeo climate (PIK) (5) 1 Technical Assistant in Evolutionary Genomics (IZW) Project The research initiative will focus on the evolution of mammals in the Sunda Shelf in southeast Asia, a global biodiversity hotspot. By combining climate reconstructions, molecular genetic data and species distribution data from the Late Pleistocene to the present we will detect and understand the mechanisms generating complex distribution patterns of genetic and species diversity (Pleistocene refugia) and thereby evaluate the impact of the hypothesised key drivers which may shape biodiversity.Using carnivores, primates and hoofed mammals as models, this will also contribute to the assessment of the long-term consequences of the current (man-made) biodiversity crisis. Prerequisites (Positions 1+2, reference 34/2012) Candidates should hold a master’s degree or diploma in biology or related disciplines and have a strong background in molecular biology, population genetics, and/or bioinformatics. Experience with ‘ancient’ DNA work and next generation sequencing is an advantage. (3, ref 35/2012) The successful candidate will investigate the ecology of mammals in the Sunda Shelf and combine stable isotope analyses with genetic work. Candidates should have a master’s degree or diploma in biology or related disciplines. Experience in working with stable isotopes and a background in evolutionary ecology is an advantage. (4, ref 36/2012) The set of tasks associated with the position includes the reconstruction and analysis of climate conditions in the last 100,000 years in southeast Asia by using proxy records derived from stalagmites and developing new (nonlinear) techniques in order to consider instationarities, uncertainties, time-series with gaps and unequally sampled time-series. The successful candidate should hold a master’s degree or diploma in mathematics or physics with profound skills in nonlinear dynamics, data analysis and programming in several languages (e.g. Python, Matlab, C++). (5, ref 37/2012) We are looking for a technical assistant with strong molecular biology skills and, preferably, experience in ‘ancient’ DNA work and next generation sequencing. We offer state-of-the-art methodology and a stimulating research environment in an interdisciplinary, collaborative project. For all candidates, organisational skills, high motivation and the willingness to work as part of a team within a highly interdisciplinary project are essential, as is proficiency in English. For enquiries or further questions, please contact Dr Joerns Fickel (IZW) Tel.: +49 (0)30 5168-314, fickel@izw-berlin.de, or Dr Norbert Marwan (PIK), Tel.: +49 (0)331 288-2466, marwan@pik-potsdam.de. All positions are subject to final financial confirmation by the Leibniz Association. Salary and benefits will be competitive (e.g., a 65% scientist’s salary for the PhD students).Positions are limited to three years and will be available from 1st April 2013. Interviews will take place 4–8 February 2013. As members of the Leibniz Association, both IZW and PIKare equal opportunity employers, are determined to increase the proportion of women in successful scientific careers, and particularly encourage women to apply. Please submit your application (quoting references 34-37/2012) with a motivation letter, CV, copies of relevant degrees and contact details of two people who can provide a reference as one single PDF-file not larger than 500 kb before or latest on January 6th, 2013 to Stephanie Vollberg / Roswitha Hildebrand, Leibniz Institut for Zoo & Wildlife Research, P.O.Box 700430, D-10324 Berlin, Germany, personal@izw-berlin.de. Posted: 11/29/12.

Louisiana State University: Drs. William J. Platt (Professor, LSU) and Kevin M. Robertson (Adjunct Professor, Tall Timbers Research Station, Florida) are seeking a student interested in working toward a Ph.D. degree in the areas of ecology and conservation biology of pine savannas in the southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain. Our areas of interest include disturbance ecology (fire, hurricane, anthropogenic) and conservation of native longleaf pine savannas. We are especially interested in a student with a strong interest in plant community ecology, plant identification, and multivariate statistics to focus research on potential responses of the highly diverse longleaf pine plant community to microsite history, including overstory pine structure and associated fuel loads, fire behavior, root competition, and soil chemistry. We have ongoing long-term studies of mature longleaf pine forests in southern Louisiana and southern Georgia for which the recent history of pine stand structure and fire regime are well known. We are offering a one-year research assistantship through Tall Timbers Research Station in Tallahassee, Florida for support when dissertation research is being established at the Wade Tract old-growth longleaf pine savanna preserve in southern Georgia. Further support is expected to be available through teaching assistantships. The student should have a keen interest in study of ecological concepts and a wholistic interest in the ecology of pine savanna ecosystems. The student will be based in Dr. Platt's lab in the Department of Biological Sciences at LSU, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Prospective students must formally apply and be accepted into a degree program in the Biological Sciences Department at LSU. Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy is a non-profit organization known as the "birthplace of fire ecology" since its establishment in 1958. Tall Timbers provides research access to thousands of hectares of pine savannas and woodlands managed with prescribed fire, including the Wade Tract, a proposed Natural Areas Landmark that is one of the very few remaining and the most-studied old-growth longleaf pine savannas. Tall Timbers is located north of Tallahassee, Florida, in the center of one of the nation's top six "biodiversity hotspots", and the surrounding Red Hills Region has been named one of the "Last Great Places" by The Nature Conservancy. If interested, contact Dr. William Platt (btplat@lsu.edu) and copy Dr. Kevin Robertson (krobertson@ttrs.org). Posted: 3/7/13.

Louisiana State University: Louisiana State University Herbarium is seeking a graduate student interested in researching a broad botanical, ecological, or evolutionary subject that would utilize our prestigious facility and collections of over 200,000 vascular plants, bryophytes, lichens, and fungi. While pursuing a degree in the Biological Sciences, the Graduate Assistant Curatorship would provide a stipend, equivalent to a teaching assistantship, and training in the techniques of collections management. The assistantship is part-time, requiring 20 hrs/wk of work in the herbarium during the Fall and Spring semesters under the guidance of the Herbarium Director and Collections Manager. Ideal candidates will be highly self-motivated, organized, and detail oriented in order to effectively succeed in databasing, georeferencing, imaging, filling, repairing, and annotating specimens. Additional activities include preparing loans and assisting with occasional collection trips. The location of the position is Baton Rouge, Louisiana, a cosmopolitan city central to the Gulf South within approximately an hour drive of many natural areas and New Orleans. One must formally apply and be accepted into a degree program in the Biological Sciences Department at LSU. Preference will be given to applicants interested in plant systematics, ecology, evolution, or related fields. For further information, please contact the LSU Herbarium Manager, Jennifer Kluse (jkluse@lsu.edu). Posted: 2/20/13.

Louisiana State University: A PhD graduate student assistantship is immediately available in the School of Renewable Natural Resources. The graduate research will involve spatial analysis of extreme weather, flood and drought events in the Mississippi River Basin. Minimal qualifications include a background in hydrology, water resources, or a closely-related field with strong quantitative background. Candidates with journal publication records and GIS experience will be highly considered. Interested applicants should submit the following materials to Jun Xu (yjxu@lsu.edu): letter of interest, CV, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references. Posted: 12/11/12.

Louisiana State University: I am seeking to recruit two students to pursue a PhD degree in Renewable Natural Resources with an area of concentration in Watershed Sciences. The students will conduct soil and water sample collections in Southwest Louisiana over a period of two years, and will analyze petroleum pollution of hydrogen sulfide and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) in various water bodies. The goal of the research is to assess transfer and environmental fate of the toxic chemical compounds in the coastal rivers and estuaries. Minimal qualifications include a background in water quality or a similar discipline (e.g. soil chemistry, environmental toxicology, hydrology etc.). A strong work ethic, strong academic record, evidence of excellent written and quantitative skills, and the ability to work both as part of a team and independently are critical, in addition to possessing a valid U.S. driver's license. To apply: Submit the following materials via email to Jun Xu (yjxu@lsu.edu): resume, unofficial transcripts & GRE scores, a letter describing relevant research experience, and names and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the positions are filled. Start date is expected to be in the spring semester of 2013. Posted: 10/19/12.

Louisiana State University: We are seeking a highly motivated PhD student to analyze riverine sediment transport and geomorphological change in coastal Louisiana. The study is part of an interdisciplinary research, supported by the NSF coupled natural-human systems (CNH) program, that aims to develop models to assess the resilience and sustainability of a CNH coastal system. This position is a research assistantship with an $18k stipend, tuition waiver, and health benefits, starting in fall 2012 for four years. The student will work closely with a group of faculty and graduate students from natural and social sciences. Qualifications: A strong work ethic, strong quantitative skills, good communication skills, and the ability to work both as part of a team and independently are critical, in addition to being prepared for work under variable field conditions and possessing a valid U.S. driver's license. Applicants with an MS in hydrology or a similar discipline (e.g. soil physics, geography, environmental sciences) are preferred. Applicants with research experience in any of the following areas: surface hydrology, sediment transport, geomorphology, and GIS/landscape modeling will be highly competitive. To apply: Submit the following via email to Jun Xu (yjxu@lsu.edu): resume, unofficial transcripts & GRE scores, a letter describing relevant research experience, and names and contact information for three references. The student will be enrolled in a graduate program within the School of Renewable Natural Resources (SRNR). SRNR has a teaching, research, and extension faculty of ~30, which includes adjunct professors of the U.S. Geological Survey's Louisiana Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Posted: 7/23/12.

Louisiana State University: A graduate assistantship (MS) is available in the Fish Physiology lab within LSU’s School of Renewable Natural Resources and LSU AgCenter’s Aquaculture Research Station. We are seeking a highly motivated individual to lead research objectives in a very unique project. This available project is centered on crayfish physiology and the identification of conditional indices and biomarkers of acute and chronic stressors. Crayfish physiology is an important component of health due to issues pertaining to stream quality, habitat alteration and the presence of diseases. The presence of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) recently identified within native and cultured crayfish populations among the Atchafalaya River Basin could present a threat to this region and potentially other watersheds and crayfish species in the future. The ability to integrate physiological responses to stressors and subsequent alterations to immunological performance will allow this graduate student to explore a variety of biological mechanisms. A greater understanding of the effects of WSSV on crayfish physiology will build a foundation for further work should the virus spread among U.S. watersheds and threaten endangered and threatened crayfish species. Qualifications - Candidates with BS degrees within the field of biology, zoology, biochemistry, and physiology are preferred. Prospective students are encouraged to email a cover letter, curriculum vitae, GRE scores, and three references to Christopher Green (cgreen@agcenter.lsu.edu). Salary – An annual stipend will be provided in addition to a tuition waiver. University based health coverage is available at a discounted cost to the student. Contact – Please send pre-application materials (Cover letter, transcripts, CV, and GRE scores) via email to Christopher Green at cgreen@agcenter.lsu.edu. Posted: 7/13/12.

Louisiana Tech University: A Graduate Research Assistant (M.S.) is needed to study the effect of coppicing on photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism in eastern cottonwood starting fall 2013. The candidate will earn a Master of Science in Biology from the School of Biological Sciences at Louisiana Tech University with the title of Graduate Research Assistant, which carries a stipend of $15k per year for two years plus tuition. Requirements: Applicants must have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale), and hold a B.S. degree in forestry, biology, environmental science or a related field. Interested applicants should email the following items to Dr. Tyree (mtyree@latech.edu), School of Forestry, Louisiana Tech University: 1.) 1-2 page cover letter, 2.) Undergraduate transcript (unofficial is fine), 3.) CV or resume, 4.) Copies of GRE scores. Posted: 4/30/13.

Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium: The Roberts Lab of Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry at LUMCON is seeking a graduate research assistant at the Master of Science level to examine the influence of river diversions on carbon and nitrogen cycling in Louisiana freshwater, brackish, and salt marshes. The student is expected to play an active role in designing and carrying out a thesis project that will examine the effects of salinity manipulations on greenhouse gas production, nitrification, and denitrification rates at multiple marshes along the Barataria Bay estuarine system salinity gradient downstream of the Davis Pond Diversion. The student will join a large, multi-institution team of researchers on the Coastal Waters Consortium (CWC) project funded by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative to study the impacts of the oil spill and future spills on salt marshes and coastal environments. Specifically, the student will be collaborating with the wetland biogeochemistry and microbial ecology group led by Drs. Brian Roberts (LUMCON), Anne Giblin (Marine Biological Laboratory), and Anne Bernhard (Connecticut College). The student will be supported through the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) Coastal Science Assistantship Program which provides the student with the opportunity to complete an internship at a CPRA office during the period of CPRA funding. The research activities will be supported through the larger CWC project. Qualifications: The candidate must have a B.S in ecology, wetland science, biogeochemistry or a related field. The candidate will also be expected to participate in field work that may require physical effort to transport equipment in field sites throughout Louisiana that are accessible only by small boats. The ability to work in a group setting is essential, as this researcher will work collaboratively with the PI’s, post docs, graduate students, and other research associates/technicians on this CWC project. The position can begin as early as 1 June 2013, but candidates must be available by August 2013 to enroll for the fall semester. The MS assistantship provides a competitive stipend including summer support, health insurance, and covers tuition expenses. Thesis research and project-related travel expenses including making at least one presentation at a scientific meeting will be covered by funding from the BP/GoMRI project. The student will be enrolled at either Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge or Tulane University depending on the program that best fits the student’s background and interests. The student’s thesis research will be based at the LUMCON Marine Center in Cocodrie, LA. To Apply: Send 1) a letter of interest that describes your interest in the position, your career goals, and details your work and educational experience most relevant to the position, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial copies are acceptable initially), and 4) contact information for 3 references to Dr. Brian Roberts (broberts@lumcon.edu) with “Wetland biogeochemistry MS position” in the subject line. For more information, contact Dr. Brian Roberts by email or phone (985-851-2821). Posted: 2/26/13.

Macquarie University: A 3.5 year PhD (MQRES) scholarship is available for a bright and energetic candidate to join Dr Ian Wright’s plant ecology group to work on the ARC-funded project “Scaling functional traits to whole-plant growth”, in which we’re quantifying the role of traits and biomass allocations in generating variation in growth rates — across species, life history stages and forest types. We view growth rates as pivotal in vegetation ecology and a core element of plant ecological strategies. Within that framework the project will depend somewhat on the interests of the successful candidate. E.g. it could involve one or a combination of field- or glasshouse-based experiments, analysis of historical growth rate datasets, and modelling/theory of trait - growth relationships. MQRES eligibility criteria for international applicants include holding a MSc (research) with high academic grades, undergraduate degree with high grades, and involvement in one or more peer-reviewed publications in a related field of research. From people meeting these criteria we can invite some number to discuss detailed research possibilities with a view to applying for the scholarship. Closing date is 7th April 2013. See more project details (ref #2012068) and information about the application process. The 2013 MQRES full-time rate is AU$24,653 per year (tax exempt). Students on scholarships are not obliged to contribute to teaching, but may do so to supplement their income. (Note, Sydney is an expensive place to live!). Up to AU$20,000 will be available to cover research expenses. Initial inquiries should be directed to Dr Ian Wright, email: ian.wright@mq.edu.au. Posted: 3/1/13.

Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Ecology: A PhD position is available in the Biodiversity Project Group of the Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Ecology (MPICE), Department of Molecular Ecology and the newly established German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) in Leipzig. The group uses the well characterized ecological model plant Nicotiana attenuata to identify genetic traits that mediate functional links within ecological networks. We will use molecular tools (transcriptome, metabolome analysis) and bioassays to study the effects of specific genes (by using transgenic plants) on performance of single herbivore species. Mesocosm experiments in the newly established ecotron facility will be used to study the influence of plant genetic traits on herbivore population dynamics. We will also perform field experiments in the plants natural environment (Great Basin desert, Utah, USA) to verify the data we have obtained from mesocosm studies. In collaboration with the Ecological Modeling Department of the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research in Leipzig (Volker Grimm), we will create models to simulate plant productivity and herbivore population dynamics. These results will be important to formulate general hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms shaping plant-insect interaction networks and thereby, biodiversity. We are seeking for a highly motivated candidate with strong background in insect and plant ecology and physiology. The project will initially start at the MPI in Jena, but will continue at the iDiv in Leipzig by the end of 2013. We offer exciting research questions, state-of-the art equipment and an excellent research environment. Successful candidate will receive a PhD fellowship. The position is available immediately and opens until filled. Please send your application including CV, statement of research interests, names and e-mail addresses of two referees to: Dr. Stefan Meldau, smeldau@ice.mpg.de. Posted: 10/10/12.

Max Planck Institute for Ornithology: The Schroeder lab, member of the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology, is offering the fully-funded three-year PhD position: Evolution of social behaviors. Natural selection is expected to lead to “good” genes taking over a population, and thereby to deplete genetic variation in natural populations. Nevertheless, even traits closely correlated to fitness often show considerable genotypic and phenotypic variation. Social behavior like dominance behavior and parental care behavior can vary widely between individuals, and incur fitness consequences. There must therefore be mechanisms operating that result in genetic variation in social behavioral traits being preserved. Different social environments may select for different social traits. A PhD position is available to examine this hypothesis and the evolutionary consequences. We will analyze 12 years of data from a pedigreed, wild island population of house sparrows. We use focused experiments on captive sparrows in Germany to test our hypotheses generated from observations on the wild population. This project takes place in cooperation with the University of Sheffield. The fieldwork on scenic and remote Lundy Island (UK) will take place 4 months each summer, requiring an independent and committed individual. Applicants should have an interest in evolutionary biology. The successful applicant will participate in the IMPRS for Organismal Biology, the PhD program of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen and Radolfzell and the University of Konstanz. All IMPRS students are supported by stipends or contracts. The program offers a dedicated teaching program, high quality research experience, and outstanding research facilities in an inspiring research and living environment. The working language is English. Each PhD student receives individual supervision and mentoring and is guided in her/his research work by a PhD advisory committee. Applicants should hold a MSc or equivalent degree in biology or a related discipline at the point of enrollment. Queries should be mailed to the IMPRS program office: IMPRS@uni-konstanz.de. Deadline for the application is January 15, 2013. Interviews are scheduled for Mid-March. The successful candidate is expected to start latest September 2013. Visit the IMPRS link above for online application. Posted: 11/16/12.

Max Planck Institute for Ornithology: The Goymann lab, member of the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology, is offering the three-year PhD position: Physiological and behavioral ecology of black and whitebrowed coucals. The African black coucal (Centropus grillii) and the white-browed coucal (Centropus superciliosus) breed in the open grasslands of the Usangu plains in south-western Tanzania. These two species are similar in size and share the same breeding habitat, but show extreme differences in their breeding biology. The whitebrowed coucal is socially monogamous, with both female and males sharing parental duties. In the black coucal the sex roles are reversed: each female vigorously defends a territory and is mated to up to 4 males. Each male incubates his own clutch of eggs and raises the young all-by-himself. We are interested in various aspects of the behavioral ecology, phenology, evolution and (hormone) physiology of sex-roles in coucals. The project involves long-term and intensive field work (including catching and tagging of birds, behavioral observations, telemetry) under harsh conditions in Tanzania and laboratory work in Germany. We particularly encourage applications of suitable PhD candidates from Tanzania. The successful applicant will participate in the IMPRS for Organismal Biology, the PhD program of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen and Radolfzell and the University of Konstanz. All IMPRS students are supported by stipends or contracts. The program offers a dedicated teaching program, high quality research experience, and outstanding research facilities in an inspiring research and living environment. The working language is English. Each PhD student receives individual supervision and mentoring and is guided in her/his research work by a PhD advisory committee. Applicants should hold a MSc or equivalent degree in biology or a related discipline at the point of enrollment. Queries should be mailed to the IMPRS program office: IMPRS@uni-konstanz.de Funding of this PhD project is not secured yet and depends on successful application for a DAAD grant of the PhD candidate together with the supervisor. Deadline for the application is January 15, 2013. Interviews are scheduled for Mid-March. Visit the IMPRS link above for online application. Posted: 11/16/12.

Memorial University: A Ph.D. graduate assistantship is available for a keen and motivated student interested in research and training centered around understanding the impact of climate change on boreal forest soil organic matter reservoirs. This assistantship is available as part of an NSERC Strategic Project research team made up of foreign collaborators, provincial and Canadian Forest Service partners as well as Memorial University researchers in Earth Sciences and Chemistry. The project is focused on exploiting the established Newfoundland and Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect (NL-BELT) with four sites located in western Newfoundland and southern Labrador. The project is focused on the potential alterations in microbial transformations of soil organic matter (SOM) and losses of relatively slow turnover pools of SOM that may occur with warming along this boreal forest transect. To isolate the potential impact of warming while maintaining an ability to apply the results to intact boreal forests, our group has been conducting investigations of soils along the NL-BELT and combining these with manipulative warming experiments to develop biogeochemical indicators of soil responses to increasing temperature. It is anticipated that this Ph.D. student will focus on the alteration of the chemical composition of soil pools and their sources with warming and across this boreal forest latitudinal gradient via multiple techniques but with a focus on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Experience with soil biogeochemistry, organic geochemistry, and/or environmental chemistry particularly at the M.Sc. level will be important. Consideration of students seeking a M.Sc. degree will only be considered in cases where a strong background of experience in environmental chemistry is demonstrated (e.g. successful B.Sc. honors thesis). Applicants should be willing and able to conduct field research at remote study sites for weeks at a time. This assistantship will be available as early as September 1, 2013 through the Department of Earth Sciences or the Ph.D. program in Environmental Sciences. Please direct inquires or send applications, including letter of interest and detailed curriculum vitae (including contact information for 3 references), to: Dr. Susan Ziegler, Canada Research Chair in Environmental Science, Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL A1B 3X5, Canada. 709.864.2669, sziegler@mun.ca. Applications will be considered until July 15, 2013. Posted: 6/10/13.

Memorial University: I invite applicants for an M.Sc. studentship involving the mathematical modelling of an aquatic parasite. The research will involve describing the effect of temperature and salinity on developmental rates, determining how temporal trends in temperature and salinity affect population dynamics, and validating the mathematical model with data. A competitive salary will be offered and funding will be available for conference travel and to pursue collaborations. Applicants should email Dr. Amy Hurford (ahurford@mun.ca). This email should include a description of your research interests, any relevant past experience and you should attach your CV. I will consider applications as they are received. For full consideration applicants should indicate their interest before July 1, 2013. Applicants should be able to begin their studies between August 1, 2013 and January 1, 2014. Interdisciplinary training in biology, mathematics and/or experience in computer programming is ideal, but only proficiency in one of these areas is necessary where there is an interest to develop further skills in other areas. Memorial University is located in St John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. The city offers many unique experiences with a vibrant arts community, stunning coastline, and proximity to a variety of outdoor activities. Posted: 6/5/13.

Memorial University: I invite applications for M.Sc. studentships in Theoretical Ecology and/or Epidemiology. Potential research projects include developing mathematical models to investigate the control of aquatic parasites and to characterize the spatial spread of wildlife diseases. Research projects will involve interdisciplinary collaborations and the use of empirical data to parameterize and validate models. Students that will fit in well with our group should value the exactness of mathematics to describe biological hypotheses and should recognize the fundamental importance of empirical results and expert knowledge in informing model derivation. Memorial University is located in St John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. Prospective students should email Dr. Amy Hurford (ahurford@mun.ca). This email should include a description of your research interests, any relevant past experience and you should attach your CV. I will consider applications as they are received. For full consideration applicants should indicate their interest before December 3, 2012. Interdisciplinary training in biology, mathematics and/or experience in computer programming is ideal, but only proficiency in one of these areas is necessary where there is an interest to develop further skills in other areas. Posted: 11/29/12.

Michigan State University: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife invites applications for a doctoral research assistantship to investigate the dynamics of white-tailed deer in response to eruptions of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD). Deer populations in Michigan suffered heavy losses in 2012. This study will explore the response of the populations and the implications of spatial arrangement of deer social groups to the management of deer after heavy mortality to EHD. The work will be done in partnership with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Qualifications: Applicants must have an MS degree in biology, wildlife, ecology, forestry or related field. Academic requirements include strong GRE scores and GPA. Financial Support: $20k stipend per year plus tuition and health benefits. Expected start date is August 1, 2013. Contact: Dr. William Porter (porterw@msu.edu), Boone and Crockett Chair of Wildlife Conservation. Posted: 1/30/13.

Michigan State University: A Master’s level graduate student position is available in the Applied Forest Ecology lab of Dr. Steve Chhin in the Department of Forestry. The graduate student will primarily conduct field and laboratory work for a project recently funded by the USDA Forest Service (Forest Health Protection program). The general objective of the project is to promote field-based application of non-destructive technologies that will allow rapid, early detection of emerald ash borer (EAB) in the Great Lakes region. Non-destructive technologies that will be examined include acoustic tomography and infrared thermography. The preferred start date for this position is May 2013 (summer semester) but applicants starting in August 2013 (fall semester) will also be considered. Qualifications: Applicants should preferably have a BS in forestry, biology, ecology, environmental sciences, or a similarly related natural resource field. Preference will be given to applicants that are highly self-motivated, possess a strong work ethic, and have strong oral and written communication skills. A background or strong interest in conducting field based research and working in a laboratory environment is desirable. A cumulative GPA greater than 3.0 in undergraduate coursework is preferred. Please submit: 1) cover letter, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) unofficial transcripts, 4) GRE scores, 5) contact information of three references, and 6) TOEFL scores (for international applicants). Please describe your career goals in the cover letter. Applications will be considered immediately and continue until the position is filled. To ensure full consideration for departmental and university fellowships please submit application material by December 10, 2012 and also apply to the MSU Graduate School by December 14, 2012. Otherwise, please submit your application by February 1, 2013. Please e-mail all application material to Dr. Steve Chhin (chhin@msu.edu). Posted: 11/30/12.

Michigan State University: Recruiting new PhD students in the Department of Forestry for independent research in fire ecology and management. Research projects will focus on understanding the role of black carbon (C) in forest soils, and may include investigating relationships among forest fuels, fire and black C; understanding the role of black C in soil nutrient and microbial community dynamics; and quantifying black C fluxes following fire disturbance. Strong written, verbal and computation skills are essential; prior experience in field or laboratory research is desired. Successful applicants will be expected to work independently as well as collaboratively as an active member of a research group, conduct field work in remote locations under variable weather conditions, and perform detailed laboratory analyses with a high level of precision. To express interest in these opportunities, please send: (1) a statement of research interests/background and professional goals, (2) a CV, (3) a list of 3-4 professional references (names and contact information), (4) GRE scores, and (5) TOEFL scores (international students only) to Dr. Jessica Miesel at mieselje@msu.edu. Funding is available for outstanding applicants. For full consideration, interested students should apply to the MSU Graduate School before December 15, 2012. Successful applicants will be housed in the Department of Forestry, with opportunity to participate in MSU’s interdisciplinary Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior program (ranked among the top Ecology & Evolutionary Biology PhD programs by the National Research Council) and/or the Environmental Science & Policy Program. Questions about these opportunities can be emailed to Dr. Miesel. In-person meetings can be arranged for students attending the AFE Fire Ecology & Management Congress in Portland December 3-7, 2012. Posted: 11/30/12.

Michigan State University: The Swenson Lab is seeking 1-2 PhD students to join the lab in the Fall of 2013. The Lab investigates the ecology and evolution of tropical and temperate trees. We specifically focus on integrating functional trait, phylogenetic and transcriptomic data with information regarding the distribution and dynamics of species. Applicants interested in one or all of these approaches are most welcome to apply. The Swenson Lab is in the Department of Plant Biology. Students would also be a part of the Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior Interdisciplinary Graduate Program. Competitive one and two year plant science fellowships are possible for excellent applicants. If you are interested, please contact Dr. Nate Swenson (swensonn@msu.edu) including a statement of your research interests/goals and a CV. Posted: 11/14/12.

Michigan State University: Graduate Assistantships/Fellowships are available for Ph.D. and M.S. students to conduct innovative and high-impact research in the Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability (CSIS). Research topics may include: ecology and management of wildlife (e.g., giant pandas in China, tigers in Nepal), systems modeling and simulation (e.g., agent-based modeling), sustainability science, coupled human and natural systems, biodiversity conservation, ecosystem services, climate change, land change science, forest and landscape ecology, natural resources and environment, systems integration (integration of ecology with demography, economics, sociology, and policy), telecoupling (socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances through globalization, trade, species invasion, migration, and other means). Examples of publications on these topics by CSIS faculty and students include Science (2012, 2010, 2008, 2007, 2003, 2001), Nature (2005, 2003) and PNAS (2012, 2009, 2008, 2007). Successful candidates can build on these previous studies and explore new frontiers of research. They will also have opportunities to interact with leaders in these fields worldwide through various ways, such as the International Network of Research on Coupled Human and Natural Systems and the NASA-MSU Professional Enhancement Awards Program, which are organized by CSIS. Application materials include: (1) letter of application, (2) statement of professional goals, (3) CV or resume, (4) transcripts, (5) GRE scores, (6) TOEFL scores (for non-native English speakers only), (7) list of 3-4 references (names and contact information), and (8) up to three representative publications if any. Unofficial copies of GRE, TOEFL and transcripts are OK initially. Applicants are encouraged to submit their application materials as soon as possible to ensure full consideration. Please email the application materials to Dr. Jianguo (Jack) Liu at liuji@msu.edu. Questions about these opportunities can also be emailed to Dr. Liu. Posted: 10/26/12.

Michigan Technological University: Temperate and tropical forest canopy response to climate change (MS) Seeking outstanding applicants for a 2-year Master of Science Assistantship investigating the effects of climate change on temperate and tropical forests. The position is funded by the USDA Forest Service International Institute of Tropical Forestry in Puerto Rico, and will be based at the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science. Student will address critical questions about temperate and tropical tree physiological responses to global warming, and field work will involve taking measurements from tall forest canopy access towers in both Michigan and Puerto Rico. Applicant must have an undergraduate degree in biology, ecology, or forestry-related field and have taken the GRE. A strong analytical background and excellent writing skills are required. Preferred qualifications include: field-based work experience, familiarity with statistical software, and an undergraduate research experience. Houghton, Michigan, located on the south shore of Lake Superior, is a safe, inexpensive, friendly community, and an excellent place for outdoor adventure (National Geographic Adventure Magazine). Applicants should create a single pdf that includes: cover letter, CV, unofficial transcripts, unofficial general GRE scores, and contact information for three references. Please email the pdf as an attachment to Dr. Molly Cavaleri (macavale@mtu.edu) with “Canopy Ecophysiology MS Assistantship” in the subject line. Desirable applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the graduate program at Michigan Tech for an August 2013 start date with the possibility of starting earlier as a summer field technician. Closes: 6/30/13. Posted: 5/29/13, revised: 6/10/13.

Michigan Technological University: A PhD research assistantship in silviculture and remote sensing is available in the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science. We are seeking a PhD research assistant to support a NASA funded research project focused on understanding the impacts of climate change and adaptive forest management on future forest conditions across the Pacific Northwest. The successful candidate will employ various remote sensing technologies (e.g., Lidar, Radar, Optical data) to assess current ecosystem composition and structure and subsequently use forest simulation models (Climate-FVS and Landis-II) to provide insights into future forest conditions in light of climate change and adaptive forest management strategies. Qualifications: The ideal candidate will be highly motivated, innovative, and posses a degree in Forestry, Forest Science, Environmental Science, or a related field. Experience with remote sensing and forest simulation modeling is also desired. The start date is negotiable; however, Fall 2013 is ideal. The School is located in a 93,000-square-foot teaching and research facility, and has state-of-the-art computing equipment, including remote sensing/GIS teaching and research laboratories. Michigan Tech is also home to the Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Institute (EPSSI), which is comprised of over twenty faculty focused upon promoting interdisciplinary research and education in various aspects of remote sensing. The University's close proximity to vast expanses of Northern Hardwood Forest make it an ideal location to conduct research on remote sensing and sustainable management in forested ecosystems. The assistantship includes a full tuition wavier and a competitive stipend. How to Apply: e-mail GRE scores, a statement of professional interests, curriculum vitae including names and contact information for three references, a writing sample, and any other relevant materials to Dr. Michael Falkowski (mjfalkow@mtu.edu). Review of applications will begin immediately. Posted: 2/21/13.

Michigan Technological University: The Department of Biological Sciences has an open PhD Fellowship available for a returned Peace Corp Volunteer starting January 2013. This position is ONLY open to candidates who have successfully completed at least two years of Peace Corps service. Documentation of Completion of Service is required along with the regular graduate application materials. We are seeking a PhD student to work in any field of Biological Sciences, Ecology, Evolution, Aquatic Sciences, Plant Bioinformatics and Genetics, Molecular Biology, etc. supervised by a faculty member from within the Department of Biological Sciences. For the first two years the successful applicant will also work to support recruitment for the Peace Corps Master’s International Programs and will concurrently report to the Director of Peace Corps Programs Dr. Kari Henquinet (kbhenqui@mtu.edu). Some travel is required. Michigan Tech is located in the snowbelt (>200” annual snowfall) of Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula on the South Shore of Lake Superior. Consideration of applications is ongoing and will continue until the position is filled. The preferred start date is January, 2013 or September 2013. It is in the best interest of an applicant to contact a faculty member in the student’s area of interest prior to application in order to receive proper attention and consideration. For more information contact Dr. Casey Huckins, cjhuckin@mtu.edu, (906) 487-2475. See also: http://www.bio.mtu.edu/peacecorps/. Posted: 11/19/12.

Michigan Technological University: 2 PhD positions in Biodiversity and Soil Carbon Dynamics of Bioenergy Crops in the Americas. Two PhD associate positions are available with a large interdisciplinary 5-year NSF-PIRE funded research project that will examine the social, economic, and ecological implications of bioenergy development in four countries across the Americas: Argentina (eucalyptus for biodiesel), Brazil (conversion of natural forests to soy, palm, and sugarcane for ethanol and biodiesel), Mexico (jatropha for biodiesel), and the U.S. (conversion of aspen forests to cellulosic ethanol). The focus of one PhD position will be to quantify bird species richness and pollinator communities in and around biofuel crops and the reference (native) vegetation at each of the four study sites. The second PhD position will focus on quantifying soil carbon and nutrient cycling and will include ecosystem modeling with DAYCENT. As part of both PhD positions, there will be substantial opportunities to collaborate with other researchers with diverse backgrounds and expertise. This will foster more integrated analysis of the impacts of bioenergy production on coupled biodiversity, water, carbon, and nutrient cycles within each of the study systems. The PhD students will be based in Houghton, MI and will be co-advised by Drs. David Flaspohler and Chris Webster and Drs. Rod Chimner and Sigrid Resh. Houghton Michigan is in Michigan's Upper Peninsula near Lake Superior and offers a host of outdoor recreational opportunities in summer and winter. The position will also require travel for extended periods of time to each of the four study sites. Minimum qualifications include a M.S. degree (or comparable demonstrated experience) in ecology, soils, wildlife ecology, or a related field. Candidates will require a strong analytical background and an ability to manage large data sets and supervise field assistants. Additionally, the prospective candidate should have demonstrated motivation and strong work habits, the ability to work independently as well as within a research group, and demonstrated ability to produce peer-reviewed publications based on individual research. Preferred qualifications for the bird/pollinator position include experience conducting field-based bird surveys by sight and sound, collecting vegetation data, and censusing pollinator arthropods. Preferred qualifications for the soil carbon position include characterizing soils, measuring trace gasses and ecosystem modeling. Proficiency in Spanish and/or Portuguese is also helpful. Interested candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, statement of interest, transcripts (unofficial versions are acceptable), and the names and contact information for three references to David Flaspohler, djflaspo@mtu.edu or Chris Webster, cwebster@mtu.edu for the bird/pollinator position and to Rod Chimner, rchimner@mtu.edu or Sigrid Resh, scresh@mtu.edu for the soil carbon position. Review of applications will begin November 20, 2012. The anticipated start date is sometime between January and May 2013 (negotiable). Funding (tuition, fees, stipend) is available for a total of four years. Posted: 10/12/12.

Michigan Technological University: I am seeking to recruit 1-2 graduate student (s) for a M.S. degree in plant evolutionary ecology. Students will have the opportunity to work on one of several research projects in the lab and to develop independent research projects (with guidance from Dr. Hersch-Green). Projects seek to (1) understand how gene (genome) duplication influences adaptation to biotic and abiotic factors in both field and molecular contexts, (2) examine shifts in multitrophic interactions, selection, and molecular evolution of ecologically important genes in invasive plant species in native and invasive ranges, or (3) disentangle taxonomic complexities with field and molecular studies. Minimal qualifications include a background in evolutionary ecology (through coursework OR research positions) and a growing interest in the field. A strong academic record, evidence of excellent written and analytical skills, and enthusiasm for field and laboratory research will be highly favored. Interested persons should contact Dr. Erika Hersch-Green by email (eherschg@mtu.edu), and include a CV and a statement of research interests that are in alignment with the lab’s interests. Suitable candidates will then be contacted for an interview to discuss projects and reference letters will be requested. Students invited to join the lab will need to submit a formal application to the graduate school at MTU. Posted: 10/11/12.

Michigan Technological University: I am seeking to recruit 1-2 highly motivated graduate student (s) for a M.S. or Ph.D., to study ecological, genetic, and quantitative approaches to the study of plant adaptation to abiotic and biotic environments. Student(s) will have the opportunity to work on one of a few new and on-going research projects in the lab and to develop independent research projects (with guidance from Dr. Hersch-Green). Research in the lab investigates the evolutionary and ecological consequences of hybridization, genome (polyploidy) and gene duplication, and sexual reproduction in complex plant communities. We also have an emphasis on pollination biology, plant-herbivore interactions, invasive species, and climate change research. Prospective students with a background and interest in evolutionary ecology, population and/or molecular genetics are encouraged to apply. Qualifications include a strong academic record and an interest in evolutionary ecology. Evidence of excellent written and analytical skills, as well as enthusiasm for field and laboratory research will be a plus. Interested persons should contact Dr. Erika Hersch-Green by email (eherschg@mtu.edu), and include a statement of interest and CV. An informal discussion of potential projects is encouraged and reference letters will be solicited at a later date. Suitable candidates will then be encouraged to submit a formal application to the graduate school at MTU. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until position(s) is filled. Start date is flexible and can be as early as January 2013. Posted: 8/28/12.

Michigan Technological University: A PhD research assistantship in Remote Sensing and Climate Sensitive Forest Growth Modeling is available in the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science. The position will support a NASA funded project focused on understanding the impacts of climate change and forest management on future forest conditions across the Pacific Northwest. The successful candidate will employ remote sensing technologies (Lidar, Radar, Optical) to assess current ecosystem composition and structure and subsequently use forest simulation models to provide insights into future forest conditions. Qualifications: The ideal candidate will be highly motivated, innovative, and posses a degree in Forestry, Forest Science, Environmental Science, or a related field. Experience with remote sensing and forest simulation modeling is also desired. The start date is negotiable; however, Fall 2012 is ideal. The School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science is located in a 93,000-square-foot teaching and research facility, and has state-of-the-art computing equipment, including remote sensing/GIS teaching and research laboratories. The University's close proximity to vast expanses of Northern Hardwood Forest make it an ideal location to conduct research on remote sensing and sustainable management in forested ecosystems. The assistantship includes a full tuition wavier and a competitive stipend. How to Apply: Interested persons should e-mail GRE scores, a statement of professional interests, curriculum vitae including names and contact information for three references, a writing sample, and any other relevant materials to Dr. Michael Falkowski (mjfalkow@mtu.edu). Review of applications will begin immediately. Posted: 7/19/12.

Minnesota State University: One MS Graduate Research Assistantship is available in the Department of Biological Sciences to study the mechanisms driving plant litter decomposition in the Sonoran Desert. Potential areas of investigation include determining what chemical attributes of plant litter favor solar photodegradation and how litter chemistry changes with photodegradation. Applicants should have some prior research experience, excellent analytical and quantitative skills, the ability to analyze and organize large data sets, and be interested in plant chemical analyses. They may also be required to travel to Arizona for occasional field and laboratory work, and must be able to work both independently and as a member of a diverse research team. To apply, send cover letter, CV, unofficial transcripts, and the names and contact information of 3 references to Dr. Christopher T. Ruhland at christopher.ruhland@mnsu.edu). Ideally the position begins in August 2013. Posted: 1/31/13.

Mississippi State University: Research Assistantship M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Science. Project Title: Habitat suitability assessment of eastern wild turkeys in Mississippi. One M.S. Research Assistantship is available within the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture. Thesis research project is aimed to: 1) assess statewide habitat suitability of wild turkeys using existing presence data and brood survey data; and 2) examine differentiation of population genetic structure of wild turkeys in Mississippi using mitochondrial DNA analysis. The student will collect tissue samples from hunter-harvested wild turkeys at wildlife management areas and some private hunting clubs across state. The research project involves spatial modeling of habitat suitability and laboratory work on mitochondrial DNA analysis and statistical analysis. The student will also conduct field surveys for validation of habitat suitability models. Qualifications: B.S. degree in wildlife sciences or a related field. Extensive in-state travel is required. Desirable qualifications include excellent written and oral communication skills and good organizational skills. A minimum 3.0 GPA and having taken the GRE is desired. Coursework in GIS or spatial analysis would be beneficial. Starting Date: 10 January, 2014. Stipend: $16,500 per year plus tuition and health benefits. Closing Date: 10 January 2014 or until position is filled. Application: Apply via electronic application within the Office of Graduate Studies, Mississippi State University. Also create a single PDF document containing the following: 1) cover letter describing credentials and professional goals; 2) a resume; 3) three references; and 4) a copy of university transcripts and GRE/TOEFL scores. Please email this file to Dr. Guiming Wang (gwang@cfr.msstate.edu) with “Wild turkey Assistantship” in the subject line. Inquiries: Dr. Guiming Wang; email: gwang@cfr.msstate.edu; phone: 662-325-0414. Posted: 4/17/13.

Mississippi State University: The Brooks Lab is seeking highly motivated Ph.D. students interested in the role of host trait distributions and their effect on consumer dynamics and invasion. Much of the work in the lab centers around the interaction between two different species of cactus moth (one native and one exotic) and their host plants (Opuntiod cacti). I would like to recruit one or two new Ph.D. students (exceptional M.S. candidates will be considered) with interest in invasion ecology, population ecology, theoretical ecology and modeling, or host-consumer interactions. Interested students should send a current vita along with a brief statement of their research interests and goals to Chris Brooks (cpbrooks[at]biology.msstate.edu). Include any relevant (unofficial) test results from the GRE, TOEFL (if necessary), etc. Be sure to include both raw scores and percentiles. Information on Graduate Studies in the Department of Biological Sciences. The Department is home to faculty with broad research interests in ecology and evolution. This group and the newly-renovated facilities in the department provide an excellent opportunity for an excellent graduate education in ecology. Posted: 2/20/13.

Mississippi State University: The Department of Forestry is seeking a graduate research assistant at the Master of Science level to examine stem growth and crown dynamics in Pacific Northwest forests. The research project will be in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station in Olympia, Washington. The objectives of the study will be to develop a better understanding of how individual trees respond to silvicultural treatments through adjustments in crown morphology. The student will be responsible for analyzing data from one or more studies located in western Washington. Opportunities will exist for the student to travel to Washington for collection of additional data. The student will also be responsible for preparing technical reports, presenting results at national conferences, preparing and presenting a thesis, and preparing and submitting manuscripts for publication. Opportunities will also exist to become involved in other projects within the Forest Ecology Lab thereby providing a broader range of experiences. Starting Date: August 2013 with potential to start earlier. Students with a Bachelor's degree in forestry, natural resources, environmental science, or related fields are encouraged to apply. Research assistantships include a full tuition waiver, a competitive annual stipend including summer support, health insurance, and thesis research funding for two years. Project-related travel expenses will be covered including making at least one presentation at a national conference. Application: Please send 1) transcripts and/or GRE scores (unofficial copies are OK initially), 2) resume, 3) contact information for 3 references, and 4) a letter of application which (i) describes your interest in the position, (ii) describes your career goals, and (iii) details your work or educational experience that is most relevant to this position. For more information please contact: Dr. Scott Roberts, Professor of Forestry, Department of Forestry, Mississippi State University, MS State, MS 39762-9681. Phone: 662-325-3044 Email: sroberts@cfr.msstate.edu. Posted: 2/19/13.

Mississippi State University: M.S. Research Assistantship: Effects of biomass production on deer forage and plant communities in intensively managed pine forests of east-central Mississippi. This is an operational-scale experiment to evaluate habitat and wildlife response to switchgrass production and biomass removal within intensively managed pine forests in Mississippi. Applicant will work during years 4 - 6 of the experiment. Student will be responsible for conducting field work (vegetation sampling, plant species identification, and also bird counts, nest searches, and other sampling as needed), supervising field technicians, analyzing data, and preparing technical reports and peer-reviewed publications. Transportation and housing in the field will be provided. There is also potential to serve as teaching assistant for courses in the applicant’s expertise. Qualifications: B.S. in ecology, wildlife management, or related field. Applicant must be willing to work under a wide range of inclement conditions (cold and hot) in the presence of biting insects and venomous snakes, sometimes for 24-hour periods. Experience with plants or birds, especially in southeastern forests, is strongly desired. Student must be willing to work cooperatively with other students on related projects. Starting Date: Flexible, August 2013 – August 2014. Stipend: Starting $16,500 per annum plus complete waiver of tuition fees. Inquiry emails are welcomed and should be directed to Dr. Sam Riffell (Co-Project Leader, sriffell@cfr.msstate.edu). Application: Submit (preferably by email): 1) transcript(s) and GRE scores (unofficial copies fine initially), 2) vita, 3) contact information for 3 references, and 4) letter of application which (a) describes your interest in the position, (b) describes your career goals, and (c) details your work or educational experience that is most relevant to this position. To: Dr. Sam Riffell, Department of Wildlife & Fisheries, Box 9690, Mississippi State, MS 39762. Posted: 1/2/13.

Mississippi State University: PhD Research Assistantship: Effects of biomass production on birds and plant communities in intensively managed pine forests of east-central Mississippi. This is an operational-scale experiment to evaluate habitat and wildlife response to switchgrass production and biomass removal within intensively managed pine forests in Mississippi. Applicant will work during years 4 - 6 of the experiment. Responsibilities: Student will be responsible for conducting field work (bird counts, nest searches, sampling other vertebrates, and vegetation sampling), supervising field technicians, assisting with supervision of a M.S. student, analyzing data, and preparing technical reports and peer-reviewed publications. Student will be expected to develop additional hypotheses related to behavior, habitat selection, and ecology of birds. Transportation and housing in the field will be provided. There is also potential to serve as teaching assistant for courses in the applicant’s expertise. Qualifications: M.S. in ecology, wildlife management, or related field. Applicant must be willing to work under a wide range of inclement conditions (cold and hot) in the presence of biting insects and venomous snakes, sometimes for 24-hour periods. Experience with birds is strongly desired. Experience with other vertebrate communities, knowledge of southeastern plant communities and quantitative skills are also desirable qualities in a Ph. D. student. Student must be willing to work cooperatively with other students on related projects. Starting Date: Flexible, August 2013 – May 2014. Stipend: Starting $23,500 per annum plus complete waiver of tuition fees. Inquiry emails are welcomed and should be directed to Dr. Sam Riffell (Co-Project Leader, sriffell@cfr.msstate.edu). Application: Submit (preferably by email): 1) transcript(s) and GRE scores (unofficial copies fine initially), 2) vita, 3) contact information for 3 references, and 4) letter of application which (a) describes your interest in the position, (b) describes your career goals, and (c) details your work or educational experience that is most relevant to this position. To: Dr. Sam Riffell, Department of Wildlife & Fisheries, Box 9690, Mississippi State, MS 39762. Posted: 1/2/13, revised: 2/28/13.

Mississippi State University: A Graduate Fellowship is available in the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture. We are searching for a highly motivated Ph.D. student to study the population dynamics of eastern wild turkeys. The project aims to: 1) simulate spatially explicit population dynamics of wild turkeys in central Mississippi, using agent-based models; 2) test hypotheses concerning effects of spatial resource heterogeneity, predation risk, and genetic relatedness between turkeys on habitat use and flock foraging of wild turkeys; and 3) assess impacts of changes in land cover and habitat management on the dynamics of wild turkey populations. We have long-term data (1989-1997) on the demography and movements of wild turkeys and carnivores (bobcats and coyotes), and will collect genetic data and GPS telemetry data on wild turkeys in central Mississippi. Responsibilities: The candidate will: 1) develop spatially explicit agent-based models for wild turkey populations; 2) lead a field crew for field data collection in central Mississippi; 3) publish results in peer-reviewed journals; and 4) assist in teaching an undergraduate course annually. Qualifications: 1) MS in wildlife, ecology, Zoology, or a related discipline before June 2013; 2) Excellent communication in English; 3) Strong quantitative skills; and 4) GPA ? 3.5. Computer programing skills are desirable, but not required initially. Start: 1 July, 2013. Salary starts at $25k per annum plus health insurance and complete waiver of tuition fees. Application and deadline: Interested students should apply online and submit: 1) official college transcripts; 2) resume; 3) three letters of recommendation; 4) letter of application, including a discussion of qualifications, experience, and professional goals; and 5) GRE scores (mandatory). The application will be closed on 1 February, 2013 or when filled. Inquiry: Send inquiry, letter of application, list of 3-4 references (name and contact information), and photocopies of academic transcripts and GRE scores electronically to: Dr. Guiming Wang at gwang@cfr.msstate.edu, Associate Professor, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA. Posted: 11/5/12.

Mississippi State University: The Ervin, Wallace, and Welch Labs are looking for graduate students (M.S. and Ph.D.) interested in studying plant ecology, evolution, and/or systematics. This group has a record of attracting federal funding from the NSF, USGS, and EPA. This group uses a wide array of approaches ranging from field collection and experimentation, to molecular approaches including next-generation DNA sequencing and bioinformatics. The Welch lab is currently studying adaptive evolution at the level of gene expression in sunflowers. Specifically, we are trying to understand the role that transcribed microsatellites may play in generating adaptive variation. Our approach combines population genetics, quantitative genetics, and functional genomics. We have also recently initiated collaborative work that is allowing us to study gene expression variation at microsatellite encoding loci at the interspecific level. Current research projects in Ervin's lab include development of landscape-scale species distribution models as means of evaluating current hypotheses about plant species invasions and projects related to general conservation ecology of plants in southeastern US ecosystems. Current research projects in Wallace's lab include systematics of Acmispon (Fabaceae) and evolutionary ecology of legume-rhizobium relationships. Additionally, GRA funding is available to support students interested in herbarium curation and use of the collection for studies of Southeastern flora. Funding for students may also be provided through teaching assistantships within the department. We are looking for students to start at any time in 2013. Information on Graduate Students in the Department of Biological Sciences. Please contact Gary Ervin (gervinATbiologyDOTmsstateDOTedu), Lisa Wallace (lisawallaceATbiologyDOTmsstateDOTedu), or Mark Welch (welchATbiologyDOTmsstateDOTedu) for more information. Also, a CV that includes information regarding prior education and research experience would be appreciated, along with a statement of students’ specific research interests. Posted: 10/22/12.

Mississippi State University: I am recruiting a Ph.D. student in Fire Ecology to begin Fall 2013 in the Department of Forestry. The student will have flexibility in specific topics, but I am looking for these research areas: 1. Plant community flammability, 2. Long-term ecological effects of fuels treatments. Applicants interested in flammability will focus on some aspect of plant flammability from lab-based work to field fire behavior, with a wide diversity of study species and sites available in the fire-prone southeastern US or in Mexico. Applicants interested in ecological effects of fuels treatments will work collaboratively with our lab and Dr. Chris Keyes at the University of Montana. Potential topic areas can vary widely, but our goal is to evaluate long-term changes in canopy and surface fuels at sites in the Northern Rockies and Southeastern Coastal Plain. Strong applicants will have abundant field research experience, a record of publication, an understanding of fire ecology and behavior (or really strong interest), and competitive GPA & GRE scores. Research assistantships include a full tuition waiver, a competitive annual stipend ($20k), and health insurance for three years. Interested applicants should email me, including your research interests, a resume/CV with relevant experience and scores, and contact information for references who can speak to your potential as a productive scholar. Dr. J. Morgan Varner III, Department of Forestry, Forest & Wildlife Research Center, 313 Thompson Hall, Box 9681, Mississippi State University, MS 39762-9681. Tel. 662-325-0792, Fax. 662-325-8726, Email mvarner@cfr.msstate.edu. Posted: 2/27/13.

Mississippi State University: I am recruiting two graduate students (both M.S.) to work with me in the Department of Forestry beginning spring 2013. The students will have some flexibility in specific topics, but the general research areas are the ecological and fire behavior consequences of mechanical fuels treatments, specifically mechanical mastication. The US Joint Fire Science Program-funded project will be based in northern California wildlands treated by mastication over the past decade. Our collaborators on this project are Eric Knapp (USAD Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station) and Stacy Drury and Erin Banwell (both at Sonoma Technology, Inc.). This work follows our initial research in the region. We will focus our efforts on evaluating the vegetation and fuel recovery of treated sites across a wide span of time-since-treatment and over a variety of fire-prone sites. Strong applicants will have competitive GPA, GRE scores, and field research experience. A familiarity with the northern California flora (or capabilities to learn), an understanding of fire ecology and management, and lack of fear of statistics are all desirable. Both positions have competitive funding, tuition waivers, computing, and supplemental travel funding (including travel to and lodging in California; conferences). In your email to me, please include your research interests, a resume/CV with relevant experience and scores, and contact information for references who can speak to your potential as a productive scholar. Dr. J. Morgan Varner III (mvarner@cfr.msstate.edu). Posted: 9/10/12.

Monash University: Two Ecology/Conservation Ecology PhD positions are available on the spatial ecology of dynamic communities and the function of invaded landscapes. Deadline for applications: 2 April 2013. Two fully-funded PhD stipends are available to students interested in working on the ecology of dynamic communities (such as alien species communities or those responding to climate change) in Associate Professor Melodie McGeoch’s collaborative research group. She have recently joined Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. One of the positions will be co-supervised by Dr Cang Hui and will involve a field-based research trip to Cape Town, South Africa. The second position will be co-supervised by Dr Heloise Gibb, currently based at LaTrobe University, Melbourne. The research will involve working with native and alien plant communities, using a combination of existing data, field-based data and modelling. The balance between field work and modelling involved in the research will differ between the two positions. The project design will be developed in collaboration between the student and supervisors. The stipend includes all course fees plus ~$25k AU per annum tax free (the equivalent of ~$33k before tax) with no teaching requirements for 3.5 years (the length of a PhD in Australia). Funding of project costs are covered, including attending at least one conference per year. The project start date can be any time in 2013, although an early start is preferred. Interested students should send their CV, a brief statement of their research interests and the contact details of two referees to melodie.mcgeoch@monash.edu. Applicants must preferably have completed at least one year of post-graduate research (including Honours or Masters) and evidence of published research will be an advantage. Preference will be given to those with a botany or entomology major, an ecology and/or soil science background and strong quantitative skills, including experience in multivariate analysis, spatial statistics, GIS and programming in R (or alternative). Posted: 3/7/13.

Montana State University: A PhD assistantship is available in Bozeman to study ecosystem services and plant-insect interaction networks. The grant supporting this research is part of an interdisciplinary study focused on ecological and economic assessment of the use of targeted sheep grazing to reduce tillage in local organic agrosystems, and the doctoral student will be a member of a vibrant team of researchers. As part of this project, the successful candidate will measure and evaluate insect diversity as well as their mutualistic and antagonistic interactions with plants. In particular, the student will investigate the impacts of agro-management systems on key herbivorous pests, natural enemies, pollinators, and crop damage. Well-qualified candidates will hold a MS degree in ecology, entomology, or related field. An excellent work ethic, ability to work independently as well as a member of a team, and proficiency in English language (written and oral) are required. Please submit (1) a letter of interest describing your career goals and research interests, (2) CV, (3) transcripts, (4) GRE scores, and (5) contact information for three references to Dr. Laura Burkle (laura.burkle@montana.edu). Posted: 9/14/12.

Montana State University: MS Assistantship – Population Ecology of the Chiricahua Leopard Frog. The successful candidate will develop a research project to understand how Chiricahua leopard frogs (Lithobates chiricahuensis), listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, use desert landscapes. Specific research questions are somewhat flexible and will be determined jointly by the advisor (Litt) and selected candidate. The student will pursue a M.S. degree in the Department of Ecology. Required: B.S. in wildlife science, ecology, zoology, or closely related field. A strong work ethic, good verbal and written communication skills, ability to work independently and as a productive member of a research team, ability to work under adverse field conditions are essential. Research will occur in on the Ladder Ranch in New Mexico, and thus will require spending summers away from Bozeman. Students must have a minimum 1100 combined GRE score (V+Q) on the previous scale and 300 on the current scale, as well as a minimum 3.0 GPA (including a 3.0 average in all biology courses; 3.0 average in all courses taken during the junior and senior years; and 2.5 average in all chemistry, physics and mathematics courses). Preferred: Background or interest in community and population ecology and herpetology. Experience trapping, handling, and identifying amphibians, radio telemetry, PIT tagging, hiking, and some experience with plant identification. Experience working and communicating with other biologists and the public. Stipend/Salary: The student will be supported by a research assistantship ($1400/month, plus insurance) and nonresident tuition will be waived. At this time, funding is pending, but will be confirmed prior to the start of the spring 2013 semester. Start Date: January 2013. We will begin reviewing applications on 15 October 2012 and will continue until a suitable candidate is selected. To Apply: Send a cover letter stating qualifications related to potential research questions and career goals, resume/cv including citations for publications, unofficial copies of transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references to: Dr. Andrea Litt, Email: andrea.litt@montana.edu (electronic applications preferred), Department of Ecology, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173460, Bozeman, MT 59717-3460. Voice: 406-994-2332, Fax: 406-994-3190. Posted: 9/10/12.

Montana State University: Post-Doctoral and Graduate Positions Available. Project 1 summary: The Northern Great Plains is a leading producer of organic small grain, pulse, and oilseed crops; but management options are limited by highly variable precipitation and easily eroded soils. This area also has strong potential for low-input organic sheep production, but access to sources of grazing and feed represents a challenge for ranchers. This project evaluates replacing tillage with targeted sheep grazing to terminate legume cover crops, manage crop residues, and reduce weed, insect, and pathogen pressures. We are recruiting candidates for a PhD position that will focus on understanding the biological and environmental factors conditioning the spread and impact of common diseases as well as approaches to mitigate them. Project 2 summary: In the western Great Plains Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are serious diseases of winter wheat transmitted by the same mite vector, the wheat curl mite. Management of these mite-transmitted diseases relies upon understanding abiotic and biotic factors that drive survival and spread of the vector and pathogen as there are no chemical controls options and multiple non-crop species can serve as reservoirs for vector/virus. Although managing green bridge hosts and planting dates are important tools to mitigate disease risk, the effect of environmental and biological variables on mite and virus population dynamics is inadequately understood; negatively impacting the potential for successful incorporation of these management tools. We are recruiting candidates for one PhD and one Post-Doctoral position to quantify risk of disease incidence and severity factors across the biological and environmental variability seen in the Great Plains. Results will improve our understanding on the factors conditioning the spread and impact of vector-transmitted cereal viruses as well as approaches to mitigate them. Location: Montana State University, Bozeman. Successful candidates will be members of a vibrant, interdisciplinary team of researchers on plant pathology and agro-ecology. Candidates must hold an appropriate degree in ecology, agroecology, or plant pathology. Excellent work ethic, team player, and proficiency in English language (written and oral) are required. Submit 1) Name of the position to which you are applying, 2) Letter of application describing career goals and research interests, 3) Resume, transcripts, and 4) Names, addresses, phone numbers and email addresses of three references. GRE and TOEFL scores (if required) are mandatory. Electronic applications are accepted. Applications should be sent to: Dr. Fabian Menalled. menalled@montana.edu. (406) 994-4783. Posted: 8/7/12, revised: 11/1/12.

Montana State University: Four PhD Opportunities in Agroecology: Targeted grazing to reduce tillage in organic dryland systems: Environmental, ecological, and economic assessment of reintegrating animal and crop production. Project summary: The Northern Great Plains is a leading producer of organic small grain, pulse, and oilseed crops; but management options are limited by highly variable precipitation and easily eroded soils. This area also has strong potential for low-input organic sheep production, but access to sources of grazing and feed represents a challenge for ranchers. This project evaluates the potential of replacing tillage with targeted sheep grazing to terminate legume cover crops, manage crop residues, and reduce weed, insect, and pathogen pressures. We are recruiting candidates for the following positions: 1. Cropping systems – weed ecology. The candidate will compare crop yield, crop quality, and crop-weed interactions between sheep-grazed and tillage based organic systems. Emphasis may include nitrogen budget, mechanisms determining crop-weed competitive interactions, role of weed diversity on ecosystems services, and approaches to manage perennial weeds. 2. Top-down impacts of targeted sheep grazing on trophic interactions. This study will assess ecosystem services provided by the enhanced diversity that we expect in the grazed organic systems by means of plant-insect interaction networks. As part of this project, the successful candidate will assess insect diversity and impact of management systems on key pests, natural enemies, pollinators, and crop damage. 3. Plant pathogen dynamics in sheep-grazed, tillage-based, and conventional small grain systems. This study will evaluate ecological constraints associated with the integrated management of diseases, including mite-transmitted cereal viruses, in dryland ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed in understanding the biological and environmental factors conditioning the spread and impact of common diseases as well as approaches to mitigate them. 4. Impact of management system on lamb performance, health and quality. The successful candidate will evaluate the impact of management system on lamb production, parasite loads, carcass quality, and indices of shelf life. Treatments will include animals grazed on native summer range, weaned and over wintered grazing a mix of crop residues and harvested feed. Successful candidates will be members of a vibrant, interdisciplinary team of researchers on agro ecology. Candidates must hold a MS degree in ecology, agroecology, entomology, weed science, plant science, animal science, or related field, depending on the position. Excellent work ethic, team player, and proficiency in English language (written and oral) are required. Submit 1) Name of the position to which you are applying, 2) Letter of application describing career goals and research interests, 3) Resume, transcripts, and 4) Names, addresses, phone numbers and email addresses of three references. GRE and TOEFL scores (if required) are mandatory. Electronic applications are accepted. Applications should be sent to: Dr. Fabian Menalled. menalled@montana.edu. (406) 994-4783. Posted: 8/7/12.

Montclair State University: A doctoral graduate assistantship is open for a student to be part of collaborative research studying soil community ecology and plant soil feedbacks in New Jersey. A likely project for the student would be in the lab of Dr. Jennifer Adams Krumins studying the soil community in association with the eastern hemlock and the woolly adelgid in collaboration with Dr. Evan Preisser at the University of Rhode Island and other researchers. Candidates should have a background in ecology and preferably some knowledge and experience with molecular microbial ecology. The student will be part of the PhD program in Environmental Management starting Fall 2013 (see link for details on application process). The Environmental Management program is a multidisciplinary platform that seeks to prepare environmental scholars who will recognize and analyze relationships among scientific, technological, societal and economic issues, and has multiple areas of specialization available, including but not limited to: environmental quality and remediation, environmental geochemistry, hydrology, environmental economics, environmental engineering, ecology, environmental policy, environmental conservation, environmental spatial analysis, environmental toxicology, global change, etc. The program currently has 40 doctoral students and 16 core doctoral faculty members. Deadline for Fall application is March 15. For more information, please contact Dr. Jennifer Adams Krumins (kruminsj@mail.montclair.edu) or the program assistant, Jasey Araque (araquej@mail.montclair.edu). Posted: 2/5/13.

Murray State University: Position available for a master’s student studying the role of bunchgrass dynamics and/or fire in determining plant diversity in longleaf pine savannas of the southeastern USA. The successful candidate will have strong intellectual curiosity, demonstrated background in field-biology, excellent written and verbal communication skills, and the capacity to learn and apply experimental statistics for study design and analysis. Position is at Murray State in western Kentucky in the lab of Paul Gagnon. Anticipated start date is August 15, 2013. The student will be supported for at least two years as a graduate research assistant through funds from a NSF research grant to Dr. Gagnon via Murray State. The stipend is $12k/yr with a tuition waver possible after the first year; no-cost housing is provided at Hancock Biological Station on Kentucky Lake. Applicants should send a single PDF file containing: 1) your CV or resume, 2) college transcripts [unofficial OK], 3) contact information for 3 academic references, 4) GRE scores [unofficial OK], and 5) a one-page statement of your research interests, related experience and career goals, to the following email address: (pgagnon@murraystate.edu). The successful applicant will subsequently apply officially through Murray State. For full consideration, submit materials by June 1, 2013. Posted: 4/29/13.

Murray State University: Graduate Research Assistant, Watershed Studies Institute. One full-time position to begin late May 2013. Qualifications: B.S. in biology, ecology, or related discipline. Previous experience with field experiments, stream/riparian ecosystems, algal and/or invertebrate ecology highly desirable. Responsibilities: To conduct research on bottom-up effects in stream and riparian food webs while completing a M.S. degree in Watershed Science. This project is fully funded, including travel to field sites in Colorado. Salary: $16k per year. Other benefits include housing at the Hancock Biological Station (Murray) and High Lonesome Ranch (Colorado). To Apply: Email a letter of application, curriculum vitae including undergraduate GPA and GRE scores, and the names and email addresses of three references to Dr. Howard Whiteman (hwhiteman@murraystate.edu). Deadline: April 4, 2013 or until the position is filled. Posted: 12/11/12, revised: 3/18/13.

National University of Singapore: I would like to invite applications for PhD scholarships in theoretical ecology, with a focus on mathematical and computational modelling of tropical forest dynamics. Understanding how tropical forests function is of fundamental scientific and practical interest, because these forests harbour a wealth of biodiversity but are being lost rapidly. Specific questions are, “What governs patterns of species richness and abundance across a tropical forest landscape?” and “What factors determine biomass carbon storage and other aspects of ecosystem function in tropical forests?” In my lab, we use a variety of quantitative methods from mathematics, statistics, physics and computer science to tackle these problems. Successful applicants will fall into one of two categories: The first category comprises students with undergraduate degrees in biology who want to develop their quantitative skills and learn the tools of theoretical ecology; The second category comprises students with undergraduate degrees in mathematics, physics or computer science who are interested in learning biology and applying their quantitative skills to biological problems. Regardless of background, any successful applicant will be passionate about biology and mathematics and will have an ability to develop independent research questions and think creatively. Successful applicants will join a new Theoretical Ecology lab in the Department of Biological Sciences of the National University of Singapore. The Department of Biological Sciences has over 300 graduate students from 19 countries. Facilities and research support are world class and the university, department and PhD program are internationally highly regarded. Singapore is a city-state with a vibrant, international, English-speaking culture, amazing food and easy access to travel opportunities in Asia. Only shortlisted candidates will be notified. Funding is available for the four-year PhD program but is competitive at the departmental level. The scholarship covers tuition fees, monthly stipend, research and conference travelling expenses and is competitive with US scholarships. To apply, please send me an up-to-date CV and briefly state your research interests. References: Please email Assist. Prof. Ryan Chisholm (chisholm@nus.edu.sg), Department of Biological Sciences. Posted: 1/9/13.

Nicholls State University: Four Teaching Assistantships and one Graduate Fellowship will be available for the Fall 2013 semester for the Master of Science in Marine and Environmental Biology program. Teaching Assistantships include tuition wavier and stipend of $4500 a semester. Graduate Fellowship includes tuition wavier and stipend of $15k a year. Admission requirements include: B.S. degree in science curriculum, minimum GPA of 3.0, and combined GRE (verbal + quantitative) score of 1,000 (prior to Aug. 2011) or 300 (after Aug. 2011). Application procedure includes an online application and fee, and cover letter, CV, official GRE scores and academic transcripts, and departmental application package including three letters of recommendation. Deadline for applying is March 22, 2013. Application materials and questions regarding the program should be sent to Dr. Aaron Pierce, P.O. Box 2021, Nicholls State University, Thibodaux, LA 70310, 985-493-2628, aaron.pierce@nicholls.edu. See Graduate Faculty for more information on faculty research interests. Some potential research projects associated with the positions are listed below: Plant Ecology and Physiology Lab: Research project will assess the vulnerability of widespread wetland plant species to anthropogenic change. Other potential research projects may document plant-animal interactions (pollination, herbivory, and seed predation) vary across plant species distributions. For more information contact Dr. Jane Carlson, Jane.Carlson@nicholls.edu. Environmental Toxicology Lab: Dr. Zou's research centers around crustacean physiology and aquatic invertebrate endocrine disruption. Current research topics include hormonal control of crustacean exoskeleton metabolism and impacts of flame retardants on ecdysteroid signaling in crab epidermis. For more information contact Dr. Enmin Zou, (em.zou@nicholls.edu). Dr. Michelle Thiaville's lab (michelle.thiaville@nicholls.edu): I am interested in the connections between the control of gene expression, nutrition, and human cancer. My research projects have focused on how specific DNA-binding proteins are deregulated in cancer, and identifying the specific genes and cellular pathways. Specific research projects will focus on a subset of DNA-binding proteins previously demonstrated to have some importance in ovarian carcinomas. Posted: 2/5/13.

North Carolina State University: A Master's of Science student is sought for a position in Dr. Michael Reiskind's laboratory in the Department of Entomology to begin in fall of 2013. Dr. Reiskind's lab studies the ecology of mosquito vectors of disease, with focal areas examining the landscape, community, and physiological ecology of mosquito vectors. Exact research project to be determined by the prospective student and Dr. Reiskind. For details on the research program and more information, please examine the lab webpage. The position includes a stipend, healthcare benefits and tuition. For more details see: graduate program in Entomology at NCSU To contact Dr. Reiskind directly, email: mhreiski(at)ncsu.edu. Posted: 4/29/13.

North Carolina State University: A PhD assistantship is available in the Ecology and IPM lab of Steve Frank. Research in the lab focuses on understanding the ecology and management of arthropods in urban areas as well as greenhouse and nursery production systems. Qualified candidate can start fall 2013. Candidates attending the Entomological Society of America meeting in November should contact Steve in advance (sdfrank@ncsu.edu) to arrange a meeting there. Please direct any additional questions or inquiries directly to Steve. Posted: 11/5/12.

North Carolina State University: MS/PhD Student Research Opportunity-January 2013. The Cardoza lab is looking for an outstanding, enthusiastic, self-motivated graduate student with interest in the sustainable agriculture and soil arthropod ecology. Research in our lab employs a multidisciplinary approach to elucidating the mechanisms driving insect interactions with their environment, particularly in agricultural systems. The selected student will be part of a sustainable agriculture multidisciplinary team evaluating organic agriculture practices on mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, nutrient cycling and ecosystem services. The main focus will be on arthropod community composition and their role in these processes. As such, candidates with demonstrated enthusiasm for, and experience with, field research are highly encouraged to apply for this position. Experience with sustainable agriculture practices is a plus. Our collaborators include a diverse group of researchers interested in ecological and organic agriculture production techniques and their effects on various aspects of environmental quality, ecological services, soil quality and arthropod and microbial activity. Requirements: We welcome inquiries from enthusiastic and dedicated individuals with background in entomology, ecology, biology, agronomy, soil science or related discipline. Minimum GPA 3.0, and 300 (MS) or 310 (PhD) pts GRE required. Candidates must have earned a degree in entomology or a related discipline for MS candidates (BS required), PhD candidates (MS required). Candidates are required to formally apply to, and must meet the requirements to be accepted by, the NCSU Graduate School before consideration. Academic requirements are determined by the Department of Entomology. For additional information regarding this opportunity contact: Dr. Yasmin Cardoza, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7613, Raleigh, NC 27695. Phone: (919) 513-1285, E-mail: yasmin_cardoza@ncsu.edu. Yearly Salary: $17.5k (MS) or $19k (PhD) plus tuition and health insurance. Posted: 9/25/12, revised: 10/30/12.

North Carolina State University: I am seeking a Master's student for a research assistantship in medical entomology in the Department of Entomology (information for prospective students). The specific project will examine the landscape ecology of container mosquitoes, and will be heavily field based in Florida. In addition to course-work required in Entomology at North Carolina State University, the student will gain expertise in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial statistical analysis, and the application of population genetic information to landscape ecology. Opportunities for continuing on to a PhD are also possible. For further information about this opportunity, you may contact Dr. Reiskind directly: mhreiski@ncsu.edu. For more general information about this and other graduate opportunities in Entomology at NCSU, please contact Wes Watson (wes_watson@ncsu.edu). Posted: 8/21/12.

North Carolina State University: We are recruiting 5-6 PhD students to participate in an NSF funded, IGERT in Genetic Engineering and Society: The Case of Transgenic Pests at North Carolina State University. This will be our IGERT’s second year. In 2012, our cohort is examining genetic modification of mosquitoes and the scientific, cultural and ethical ramifications this topic presents. Our student cohort entering in Fall 2013 will focus on societal and technical issues related to alleviating negative impacts of invasive species on the biodiversity of island ecosystems. What are the social, ethical, and ecological consequences of current techniques and what would be those associated with approaches involving genetic engineering? We are looking for excellent students who are interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary approach to their graduate training. Students may have majored in humanities, mathematics, or a social/natural science, and should be seeking broad and rigorous graduate training across these areas. We welcome students who have a Master’s degree specializing in one of these areas and want strong interdisciplinary training at the doctoral level. Students who participate in the program will receive a PhD in a home doctoral program and a graduate minor in Genetic Engineering and Society. The minor will include four courses, one of which will be taught in Latin America. In addition to full fellowships, funds are available for international internships. Please visit our website, linked above, for more details on the program, including a list of participating faculty. In addition to contacting potential faculty mentors, prospective students are encouraged to email questions to: GES_GPM@ncsu.edu. Posted: 8/13/12.

North Dakota State University: I am seeking to recruit highly motivated students to pursue graduate degrees in Entomology (either MS or PhD) studying insect ecology in agroecosystems. Specific research directions are somewhat flexible, but I am looking for help with: 1) How bacterial endosymbionts and the surrounding environment structure aphid food webs. 2) The ecology and management of spider mites and other herbivores on soybeans. 3) The effect of soil health and salinity on above ground herbivores. Qualifications include enthusiasm, a strong academic record, and a desire to work at the interface of ecology and entomology. Students awarded one of these competitive graduate assistantships will receive an annual stipend, a tuition waiver, and research support. Review of applications begins immediately and continues until filled. To apply, please email Jason Harmon at Jason.Harmon@ndsu.edu with the following: 1) A cover letter which discusses your background, qualifications, research interests, degree you wish to pursue, and available start date 2) A CV 3) Academic transcripts (unofficial are fine) 4) Contact information for at least 3 references. NDSU is a land-grant institution in Fargo, ND with over 14,000 students and a strong focus on scientific research. See the Harmon lab for more information and the full advertisement. Posted: 10/15/12.

Northeastern University: I am seeking motivated Ph.D. students interested in joining the Gouhier Lab at Northeastern's Marine Science Center in Nahant, Massachusetts for the 2013-2014 academic year. The lab is primarily interested in understanding how ecological and environmental processes occurring at different spatial and temporal scales affect the structure, dynamics, and functioning of interconnected marine ecosystems. To address this topic, we use a combination of mathematical models, computer simulations, and statistical analyses of large datasets. Students in the lab are expected to develop an independent research project based on their primary interests with significant input and support from the PI. Research topics can run the gamut from fundamental theoretical ecology (e.g., non-equilibrium metacommunity dynamics) to applied conservation biology (e.g., marine reserve design). Students will have access to a traditional wet lab to conduct experimental work in coastal ecosystems and a dry lab for high-performance computing. Funding via teaching assistantships is available. The Marine Science Center is located just 15 miles from Boston and is home to a strong faculty with expertise in conservation biology, fisheries, evolutionary ecology, climate change, ecosystem functioning, and quantitative ecology. If you are interested in joining the lab, please read my letter to prospective students and then send me (Dr. Tarik Gouhier: t.gouhier@neu.edu) an email with (1) your CV, (2) a brief (no more than one page) description of your research interests, and how they relate to the the lab’s. Posted: 12/13/12.

Northern Arizona University: Dr. Sánchez Meador seeks applications from highly-motivated students interested in pursuing graduate studies in restoration ecology and modeling coarse woody debris decomposition (M.S.:$17,680/yr for two years; also includes tuition remission and student health coverage). The selected student will investigate and model short- and long-term snag fall and downed log decay rates for southwestern ponderosa pine forests and will receive a high degree of exposure to techniques such as dendrochronology, sampling, and statistical modeling. This information will then be used to validate associated functions within the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) and a locally developed forest reconstruction model used to quantify reference conditions. The position starts the Fall of 2013. To apply, send (as a PDF or Word Document): 1) a CV (including GPA, GRE scores and complete contact information); 2) a letter of interest (stating clearly research interests); and 3) the names and contact information of three references to: Andrew.SanchezMeador@nau.edu. After an initial screening, selected finalists will be asked to submit a formal application to the School of Forestry. Students who do not have a previous degree in forestry are eligible for admission to the NAU School of Forestry graduate program. However, upon admission, students who are admitted without a previous degree in forestry must take 15 hours of remedial coursework in forestry. Posted: 12/17/12.

Northern Arizona University: A highly-motivated applicant is sought who is interested in pursuing graduate studies in ecological restoration of mixed-conifer forest. The selected student will investigate long term dynamics of southwestern mixed-conifer forests, focusing on reference conditions and changes in species composition, demographics, and spatial patterns. This project will likely receive a high degree of exposure to techniques such as dendrochronology, spatial statistics, and demographic modeling. This position will be co-advised by Dr. Andrew Sánchez Meador, School of Forestry and Dr. David Huffman, Ecological Restoration Institute at NAU in Flagstaff, AZ The position starts Fall of 2013, with the possibility to begin data collection in the summer of 2013. To apply, send (as a PDF or Word Document): 1) a CV (including GPA, GRE scores and complete contact information); 2) a letter of interest (stating clearly research interests); and 3) the names and contact information of three references to: Andrew.SanchezMeador@nau.edu. After an initial screening, selected finalists will be asked to submit a formal application to the School of Forestry. Students who do not have a previous degree in forestry are eligible for admission to the NAU School of Forestry graduate program. However, upon admission, students who are admitted without a previous degree in forestry must take 15 hours of remedial coursework in forestry. Posted: 12/17/12.

Northern Arizona University: A highly-motivated applicant is sought who is interested in pursuing graduate studies in restoration ecology. The selected student will investigate long term dynamics of southwestern mixed-conifer forests, focusing on reference conditions and changes in species composition, demographics, and spatial patterns. This project will likely receive a high degree of exposure to techniques such as dendrochronology, spatial statistics, and demographic modeling. This position will be co-advised by Dr. Andrew Sánchez Meador, School of Forestry and Dr. David Huffman, Ecological Restoration Institute at NAU in Flagstaff, AZ The position starts Fall of 2013. To apply, send (as a PDF or Word Document): 1) a CV (including GPA, GRE scores and complete contact information); 2) a letter of interest (stating clearly research interests); and 3) the names and contact information of three references to: Andrew.SanchezMeador@nau.edu. After an initial screening, selected finalists will be asked to submit a formal application to the School of Forestry. Students who do not have a previous degree in forestry are eligible for admission to the NAU School of Forestry graduate program. However, upon admission, students who are admitted without a previous degree in forestry must take 15 hours of remedial coursework in forestry. Posted: 12/17/12.

Northern Arizona University: The Bowker lab at the School of Forestry seeks a motivated Ph.D. student to conduct field and greenhouse experiments near Flagstaff, Arizona starting in Fall 2013. The student will use the newly-established Southwest Experimental Garden Array (SEGA) to determine the role of soil organisms (e.g. mycorrhizal fungi, pathogens, etc.) in speeding or slowing plant migration under climate change. SEGA provides the infrastructure and a rare opportunity to conduct cutting edge global change research. Four years of funding are available to the student (Annual stipend of $20k, tuition remission, and student health coverage) in addition to modest project costs. The student will be expected to seek additional resources (grants, scholarships, etc.) to help extend the project. Objectives: The southern Colorado Plateau is already exhibiting rapid contraction of species distributions as climatic warming shifts the lower elevation and latitudinal limits of plant species that may be faster than expansion of species ranges at the upper elevation and latitudinal limits. Specifically, the objectives of this research are to: 1. Determine whether stress-adapted soil communities can enhance growth and fitness of less stress-adapted plant populations, thereby buffering against die-back. 2. Determine whether the adaptations of soil organisms dictate the success of assisted migration of plant species into cooler climates. Within this general framework, the student will be encouraged to develop their own additional research questions. The School of Forestry is one of the top Forestry Schools in the nation, and a productive research environment, with faculty members specializing in a variety of ecological topics such as landscape ecology, ecological restoration, plant ecophysiology, entomology, hydrology, and soil ecology among other topics. The candidate will also have opportunities to interact with members of the Soil Ecology lab of Nancy Johnson who will also be involved in the project. Preferred Qualifications: Master of Science in Forestry, Biology, Environmental Science or related field, or a Bachelor of Science in these fields supplemented with research experience (undergraduate thesis, capstone or internship, or employment-related experience). Candidates with field research experience will be strongly favored, especially in maintenance and construction of field experiments. Candidates with previous experience in soil ecology and/or climate change experimental manipulations will also be favored. Due to manual labor needs in the experimental setup, physical fitness is required. The candidate must satisfy all requirements set by the School of Forestry, and NAU. Admissions requirements (Deadline March 15): • GPA of 3.0 or greater on a 4.0 scale in all college and university work • GRE scores in the top 40th percentile • If English is not your native language: a score of at least 80 on the internet-based TOEFL or 550 on the paper-based TOEFL or 213 on the computer-based TOEFL • Three letters of recommendation. How to apply: First contact me directly (matthew.bowker@nau.edu) to state your research interests, and motivations for attending graduate school, with “SEGA graduate student inquiry” in the header. Please provide a resume or C.V., and provide your GRE scores and GPA. If I agree that you are a good match for the position, I will encourage you to apply to the program. Posted: 12/3/12.

Northern Arizona University: The Johnson Lab of Soil Ecology has an opening for a Ph.D. student to study arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in a series of field studies designed to examine the importance of geographic location, host plant genetics and soil fertility on the structure of AM fungal communities. This position will provide graduate training and experiences through participation in a USDA funded collaborative research project involving research laboratories in the United States and Europe. Molecular genetics will be used to identify Glomeromycota inhabiting the roots of prairie grasses in large-scale field studies. These findings will be combined with studies of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics to gain insights about the role of mycorrhizal symbioses and plant diversity in belowground carbon sequestration. Research collaborators: Gail Wilson, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater Oklahoma USA R. Michael Miller, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois USA Philippe Vandenkoornhuyse, University of Rennes, France. More information about Graduate Programs and the Argonne experimental site. Qualifications: - Interest in mycorrhizal ecology - Master’s degree (or bachelors degree with extensive molecular experience) - Experience extracting and amplifying fungal DNA - Experience using bioinformatics software - English fluency and strong writing skills. Application Deadline: Send CV to Nancy Johnson (Nancy.Johnson@nau.edu, 928-523-6473) by January 1, 2013. Posted: 11/2/12.

Northern Illinois University: The Ecology, Evolution, Behavior, and Conservation faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences are seeking applicants to the department's M.S. and Ph.D. graduate programs for the 2013-2014 academic year. Research interests among the faculty are diverse and include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation genetics, vertebrate and invertebrate evolution, plantphylogenetics, behavioral ecology, microbial ecology, and bioinformatics. The EEBC faculty includes: -Nicholas A. Barber, community ecology, http://www.bios.niu.edu/barber/lab/Barber_Lab/Home.html -Neil W. Blackstone, invertebrate evolutionary biology, http://www.bios.niu.edu/blackstone/blackstone.shtml -Melvin R. Duvall, plant molecular phylogenetics, http://www.bios.niu.edu/duvall/duvall.shtml -Holly P. Jones, restoration ecology and conservation biology, http://www.bios.niu.edu/jones/jones.shtml -Bethia H. King, insect behavioral ecology, http://www.bios.niu.edu/bking/bking.shtml -Richard B. King, population genetics and conservation biology, http://www.bios.niu.edu/rking/rking.shtml -Virginia L. Naples, comparative morphology and vertebrate paleontology, http://www.bios.niu.edu/naples/naples.shtml -Karen E. Samonds, paleontology and paleobiogeography, http://www.sadabe.org/Samonds/Index.html -Wesley D. Swingley, microbial ecology, http://www.bios.niu.edu/swingley/swingley.shtml -Yanbin Yin, bioinformatics and evolutionary genomics, https://sites.google.com/site/yinbioinfolab/home Details of the graduate program and application process. The deadline for application materials is February 15, 2013. However, prospective students should contact potential faculty advisors well in advance of applying to discuss research interests and relevant qualifications. Posted: 10/12/12.

Northwestern University/Chicago Botanic Garden: The Graduate Program in Plant Biology and Conservation is a joint program between Northwestern University (NU) and the Chicago Botanic Garden (CBG). Both MS and PhD degrees are offered. The program offers a unique opportunity to study ecology, evolution, and environmental issues at the interface of basic and applied plant science. Students apply to the program through Northwestern University and take their courses at both NU and CBG, with faculty from both institutions. The state-of-the-art Plant Conservation and Science Center at CBG is a tremendous resource for students, and the Chicago region provides a stimulating environment for research in conservation and sustainability. Faculty research areas include: Climate change Conservation genetics Crop evolution and diversity Invasion biology Paleobotany, paleoecology, and paleoclimate Phylogenomics Plant-animal interactions Plant demography and reproductive ecology Plant and fungal systematics and evolution Restoration ecology Soil ecology and fungal diversity To learn more, visit the links above or contact program director Nyree Zerega (nzerega@chicagobotanic.org. Application deadlines: PhD: December 31, 2012 MS: February 15, 2013. Posted: 10/10/12.

Nova Southeastern University: Dr. Sam Purkis seeks to hire an outstanding PhD or post-doctoral researcher into his Remote Sensing and GIS lab at NSU's Oceanographic Center. The project is collaborative between NSU and the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (LOF). The successful candidate will play a senior role in the planning and execution of remote sensing operations for the LOF Global Reef Expedition. This ongoing initiative is visiting remote reefs throughout the Pacific, Indian Ocean, and Red Sea - globalreefexpedition.org. You will join several LOF cruises per year aboard the M/Y Golden Shadow, a 67m logistical support vessel, to collect ground-truth and geophysical data that you will use to develop high-resolution habitat and bathymetry maps from Worldview-2 satellite imagery. You will also have the opportunity to address your own science questions related to this work. The project is exciting because of its large scale and you will be working with several tens of thousands of sq. km of imagery per year. The position will see you visiting little-studied reef sites in the Pacific, before a shift in focus to the GBR and Coral Sea in 2014, with subsequent legs of the GRE moving through the Indian Ocean and finishing in 2016 in the Red Sea. We are looking to develop an exciting collegial atmosphere with a lot of scientific freedom. The initial term will be for one year with the potential for renewal through 2017. The position will be supervised by Sam Purkis at NSU's "Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Ecosystems Research" facility on the ocean side of Port Everglades in Hollywood, Florida. Interested candidates should send to purkis@nova.edu: (1) a CV, (2) details of research interests and possible research projects, and (3) contact information for three referees. Interviews will commence upon receipt of application and will continue until the position is filled. The candidate will be highly numeric and key factors in our hiring decisions will be creativity, motivation, productivity, and publication record. The domain of your expertise will be remote sensing, GIS, and marine spatial planning. SCUBA experience will be considered favourably. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, US Citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Posted: 9/20/12, revised: 4/22/13.

Oakland University: (Rochester, Michigan) A graduate student position (M.S.) will be available in the Fall Semester of 2013, for a student with research interests in stream, riparian or wetland ecology. The student will have considerable influence in the direction of his/her research, but applicants with interests in the following areas are particularly encouraged to apply: invasive species; restoration monitoring; human impacts; and organic-matter decomposition. The position includes a modest teaching stipend, office space, lab resources and use of a field vehicle. Interested applicants should email a CV, and cover letter (both as PDFs) that details past research experience and future career goals to: Scott Tiegs (tiegs@oakland.edu) before March 15, 2013. To learn more visit the Tiegs Stream Ecology Lab website. Posted: 2/4/13.

Ohio State University: Graduate (MS or PhD) student opportunities in the Stream and River Ecology Laboratory, School of Environment and Natural Resources. I am seeking 2 graduate students (MS or PhD-level) to conduct field- and lab-based research on (1) River-Riparian Food Webs and (2) Stream Fish Conservation and Propagation. The research of the first position will focus on the influences of dam removal on riverine food-webs and aquatic-terrestrial fluxes of energy, carbon, and organisms. The research of the second position will focus on laboratory propagation of Tippecanoe and spotted darters as well as a field-based study investigating juvenile darter feeding ecology. Applicants should have demonstrated coursework in aquatic ecology and other related disciplines, strong communication skills, field and/lab experience relevant to the position, and a record of academic excellence (>3.6/4.0 GPA and >70th percentile in combined Verbal and Quantitative GREs strongly preferred). Interested applicants should send to Dr. Mazeika Sullivan (sullivan.191@osu.edu) a brief statement of graduate research interests, a CV including GPA and GRE scores (with percentiles), and contact information for three references by 1 December 2012. Posted: 10/11/12.

Ohio State University: Graduate (MS or PhD) student opportunity in Watershed Hydrology, School of Environment and Natural Resources. I am seeking a MS or PhD-level graduate student to conduct field-based research on hydrologic flow permanence in headwater streams. Ephemeral and intermittent streams exhibit streamflow regimes that fluctuate between drying and wetting, the degree to which is a distinguishing ecosystem characteristic that is associated with a range of important ecological and societal values. Despite the fact that these streams are a global phenomenon, occurring across a variety of hydroclimatic regimes (e.g., arid to tropical), quantifying the spatiotemporal variability of flow permanence and understanding the implications on physical, chemical, and biological stream processes remains an ongoing challenge. This research will focus on quantifying spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic flow permanence in small streams in Ohio and the Central Appalachian Mountain Region. Potential research topics include, but are not limited to * stream drying patterns within the context of local and landscape-scale morphology, * flow permanence changes under different current and historic land conversion (specifically surface mining, agriculture, and urbanization), and * ecological implications to changes in flow permanence. The position will begin August 2013 (Fall Semester) and can be either a masters or doctoral appointment depending on interest and experience of the student. Support will be a combination of teaching and research assistantships (approximately $20K per year plus tuition, fees and health benefits). Fellowship support may be possible for outstanding applicants. The position will be based at the Ohio State University Agricultural and Research Development Center (OARDC) in Wooster, Ohio. Wooster (community of 25,000) is located approximately 90 miles northeast of Columbus and approximately 50 miles south of Cleveland. Full time coursework will take place at the University's main campus in Columbus, Ohio for the first year. Research will be based at the OARDC. Applicants should have * demonstrated coursework in hydrology, geomorphology, and ecology (or related field) * a record of academic excellence (>3.5/4.0 GPA and >70th percentile in combined Verbal and Quantitative GREs strongly preferred) * strong communication (both oral and written) skills * demonstrated experience in field studies preferred Interested applicants should send to Dr. Kristin Jaeger (jaeger.48@osu.edu) a written statement of graduate research interests, a copy of their CV, GPA and GRE scores, unofficial transcript or list of coursework, and contact information for three references by 1 December 2012. Submission of the formal application by 7 January 2013 is required to ensure full consideration for available fellowships. (see admissions). Posted: 9/26/12.

Ohio University: The Graduate Program in Environmental and Plant Biology is recruiting doctoral and master’s level students for the 2013-14 AY. The graduate focus group in Deciduous Forest Ecology provides training over a broad range of scales including: ecophysiology, population biology, community ecology, landscape ecology, ecosystems, and global change biology; along with more specialized areas such as: reclamation and restoration ecology, soil biology, conservation, invasive species ecology, etc. Faculty members currently accepting graduate students include: Jared L. DeForest (Ecosystem ecology, soil biology, climate change) Glenn R. Matlack (Population biology, forest history, spatial ecology) Brian C. McCarthy (Community ecology, forest herb dynamics, invasive species) David M. Rosenthal (Physiological ecology, global change, invasion biology) Morgan L. Vis (Aquatic biology, stream restoration ecology, acid mine drainage) OU is a mid-sized comprehensive university located in rural southeastern Ohio. The quaint city of Athens provides a wonderful living environment with many opportunities for recreation and personal growth. The region is dominated by forest cover and presents numerous opportunities for all forms of forest ecology research. The deadline for application materials to the graduate program is 15-JAN-2012. However, prospective students typically have their materials in well before this date. Interested students are requested to contact a faculty member of interest prior to application to seek their support. Application is done online. For additional assistance, please contact the Graduate Chair, Morgan Vis, at vis-chia@ohio.edu. Posted: 9/27/12.

Oklahoma State University: Ph.D. student to study the role of soil microbial communities in restoration of grassland ecosystem functions. The Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management has openings for 2 Ph.D. students to study restoration ecology, plant community ecology, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the Wilson and Hickman research programs. These positions will provide graduate training and experiences through participation in a Department of Defense funded collaborative research project involving laboratories at Oklahoma and Indiana, with field sites in Illinois, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Our major research objective is to evaluate the best way to restore native ecosystems following non-native species invasion of grassland ecosystems by improving our understanding of soil ecosystems. The ultimate goal is to improve our understanding of the ecological causes and consequences of invasion by non-native invasive plant species. Research collaborators: Gail Wilson, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater Oklahoma USA; Karen Hickman, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater Oklahoma USA; Jim Bever, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana USA; Peggy Schultz, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana USA. Information about the Graduate Programs Wilson PhD student research will focus on mycorrhizal and soil ecology, Hickman PhD research student will focus on plant community and restoration ecology, This research will be conducted as a team approach with all collaborators from both universities. Qualifications: •Interest in restoration ecology and plant community or mycorrhizal ecology •Master’s degree in a related field of study •Strong writing skills •English fluency For Mycorrhizal Ecology position: Send CV and letter of interest to Gail Wilson before June 15, 2013 E-mail: gail.wilson@okstate.edu Tel: 405-744-5539. For Plant Community Ecology position: Send CV and letter of interest to Karen Hickman before June 15, 2013 E-mail: karen.hickman@okstate.edu Tel: 405-744-9579. Posted: 4/25/13.

Oklahoma State University: PhD student opportunity in burying beetle ecology Dr. Barney Luttbeg is seeking a Ph.D. student to study the ecology and behavior of the endangered American burying beetle Nicrophorus americanus. The project is part of a 3-year funded project being done in collaboration with Dr. Carmen Greenwood and Dr. Kris Giles in Entomology and Dr. Scott McMurry in Zoology. The project is primarily investigating the abiotic and biotic factors that affect the distributions of the American burying beetle. In addition, the student will have the opportunity with faculty assistance to formulate related questions about burying beetle life history strategies, reproductive behavior, or competition with other invertebrates. The Luttbeg lab focuses on questions of how individuals gather and use information in predator-prey and mate choice situations and how those informational constraints affect ecological and reproductive dynamics. The project will require extended periods in the field in southeastern Oklahoma and working in a team of scientists. The position has three years of 1 semester and summer financial support with teaching assistantships to cover other semesters and research money. Ideally the student will already have a Master's degree or extensive research and field experience. This position needs to be filled quickly. If interested, please send an email with a CV to Dr. Barney Luttbeg (luttbeg@okstate.edu). Posted: 1/2/13, revised: 1/24/13, 3/7/13.

Old Dominion University: I am seeking a highly motivated M.S. student to join my lab in the Department of Biological Sciences at Old Dominion University, starting fall 2013. This student will work as part of a new collaborative radar project examining migrant use of hardwood forest habitat during fall migration in Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. Applicants must be highly motivated, have field experience that involves the ability to identify Eastern passerine migrants by sight and sound, have leadership abilities in order to coordinate several independent field crews, possess strong quantitative skills, and have competitive GPA/GRE scores. The ability to begin field work in August 2013 is required. Students with strong initiative and a desire to carve out their own research questions within this project are highly encouraged to apply. If you are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in my lab on this project, please send me the following: a current CV; GRE and GPA scores; a statement of your research interests, career goals, and why you would like to pursue a graduate degree with me; and the names, phone numbers, titles, and email addresses of at least three academic / professional references. Applications will be reviewed upon receipt. Please see my website (www.ericlwalters.org) for more information about my lab and the ODU Biology Graduate Program website for more details on application procedures. All applications must first be sent by email to: gradschool2013@ericlwalters.org for my consideration. Posted: 5/29/13.

Old Dominion University: A graduate research assistantship is available starting fall semester 2012. The project involves cutting edge application of ground-penetrating radar to quantify root biomass and spatial distribution. The research will be conducted at the Blackwater Ecologic Preserve in Virginia and at two sites in Florida (Kennedy Space Center and the Disney Wilderness Preserve). A doctoral student is preferred but a master’s student will be considered. Applicants should have strong data management and computer skills as well as a solid background in plant ecology. Successful applicants would develop their master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation around the research. The financial aid package is $22k per year plus full tuition waiver for a doctoral student. If interested, submit a resume with cover letter (include GPA and GRE scores) to Dr. Frank P. Day, Professor and Eminent Scholar, Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (fday@odu.edu). Posted: 4/23/12, revised: 5/25/12, 6/25/12, 8/1/12.

Oregon State University: is recruiting two graduate students to study insect ecology under a USDA NIFA National Needs Fellowship at OSU's Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center. One position will focus on terrestrial invertebrates and the other on aquatic invertebrates. Graduate students will work in agro ecosystems in eastern Oregon. Students will be part of an interdisciplinary team working on complex, emerging issues related to the provisioning of ecosystem services in irrigated agricultural landscapes. See website for more information about the overall program. The terrestrial insect ecology graduate student will focus on research related to invertebrate mediated ecosystem services in riparian and other uncultivated areas in irrigated agricultural landscapes. Candidates with interests in pollinators and natural enemies (e.g. spiders, carabids, parasitic Hymenoptera) and/or plant-insect interactions are particularly encouraged to apply. The aquatic invertebrate ecology graduate student will work on the impact of land-use/agricultural practices on stream aquatic invertebrates. Suitable projects include, but are not limited to, stream assessment using trait-based approaches, life history analyses of specific taxa, and field experiments. Beginning Summer 2013. Eligibility restrictions - US Citizenship. Application Deadline - February 15, 2013 (or until position filled) Contact David Wooster, Associate Professor - david.wooster@oregonstate.edu. Posted: 2/18/13.

Oregon State University: The Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI) in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science (CEOAS) is recruiting a PhD student for a Graduate Research Assistantship (GRA). The GRA will study forest die-off through earth system modeling. The student’s research project will focus on the development of new quantitative tools to assess model uncertainty with an emphasis on non-linear system behavior. The student will work to quantify, better understand, and reduce uncertainty associated with multi-dimensional ecological thresholds. The student’s project will use Non-parametric Multiplicative Regression (NPMR). The project, funded by NSF, will begin in the fall of 2013. Strong written, verbal, and quantitative skills are essential. Creativity is required. Programming experience is strongly preferred. The student must enjoy statistics and modeling. An incoming student with an M.S. degree or equivalent work experience is strongly preferred. The successful applicant will be expected to work independently and collaboratively as an active member of an interdisciplinary research group. To express interest in this PhD opportunity, please send the following to Dr. Heather Lintz at hlintz@coas.oregonstate.edu: • A statement of research interests, professional goals, and research background • Curriculum Vitae • List of 3-4 professional references (names and contact information) • GRE scores • TOEFL scores (international students only). Apply to the Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences Major within the CEOAS Graduate Program. Applications are due no later than January 5, 2012. Questions can be emailed to Dr. Heather Lintz (hlintz@coas.oregonstate.edu). In-person meetings can be arranged for students attending the AGU meeting in San Francisco, December 3-7, 2012. Posted: 12/3/12.

Oregon State University: The Forest Soils Lab in the Department of Forest Engineering, Resources & Management is seeking a MS or PhD level graduate student to begin either fall 2012 or spring 2013. The student will have some flexibility in specific topics, but the general research areas will fall into one of these areas: 1. Effects of forest management (e.g. organic matter retention, competing vegetation control) on soil carbon content, nutrient availability, and stand productivity. 2. Examine aboveground nutrient demand in individual Douglas-fir trees across large spatial scales (e.g. watersheds) using remote sensing tools. 3. Examine the role that soil and site characteristics have in explaining the susceptibility of Douglas-fir trees to diseases such as Swiss needle cast. 4. Examine forest fertilization in relation to site and stand response and/or susceptibility to disease. The student will be responsible for completing course work, collecting data and samples from the field, analyzing samples in the laboratory, data analyses, preparing progress reports, presenting results at national conferences, preparing and presenting a thesis, and preparing and submitting a manuscript(s) for publication. The student will also be expected to be involved in other projects within the research group thereby providing them with a broad range of experience and opportunities to collaborate. Potential Starting Dates: September 2012 (preferred) - January 2013 Strong applicants will show an interest in forest soils and have experience with analytical chemistry techniques, competitive GPA and GRE scores, research experience, and good written and oral communication skills. Research assistantships include a full tuition waiver, a competitive annual stipend including summer support, health insurance, and thesis research funding for at least two years. Application: Please email me 1)copies of transcripts OR your relevant scores, 2) CV or resume, 3) contact information for 3 references and 4) a well-written statement of your research interests and career goals and how this assistantship fits those interests/goals. Dr. Jeff Hatten jhatten@cfr.msstate.edu (until September 17, 2012) or jeff.hatten@oregonstate.edu (after September 17, 2012). Posted: 8/9/12.

Pennsylvania State University: I am seeking a M.S. student interested in studying movements and habitat use of snowshoe hare in northern Pennsylvania in response to habitat management activities. The range of snowshoe hare in Pennsylvania is contracting, likely due to climate change. The Pennsylvania Game Commission is interested in learning how to increase the resiliency of hare populations in the face of increasing winter temperatures and reduced snowfall. Funding is available for a student to begin in August 2013. Project is fully funded at a Grade 12, half-time assistantship (~$23k/yr) with health benefits. Applications will be reviewed as they are received. Qualifications and How to Apply: B.S. degree in a natural resource discipline and GRE scores >60th percentile. Desirable skills in an applicant include the ability to work in adverse conditions, supervise and inspire technicians, and be well organized to oversee data collection between 2 study areas. Quantitative skills and experience with use of GIS/GPS technology necessary. Please send a cover letter describing your research interests (please indicate your GRE scores), CV, and unofficial copies of transcripts to Duane R. Diefenbach (ddiefenbach@psu.edu). Please include contact information for 3 references. Posted: 6/21/13.

Pennsylvania State University: I am looking for 2 students to begin PhD research with myself, Michael Sheriff, at Penn State University. These positions are fully funded for the first three years, including tuition and summer salaries. The starting date is flexible but preference will be for a starting date this fall (Aug/Sept) or January 2014. The research focus of my lab addresses one of the fundamental questions in biology: what limits and regulates animals in their natural world? Our approach is to bridge physiology, behavior, and ecology to understand how animals interact with the world around them. As such, we are broadly interested in the underlying physiological mechanisms by which ecological interactions (predation, competition, climate, etc…) alter behavior and cause changes in reproduction, survival, and ultimately population demography and community structure. Projects in our research group are centered on two major themes: 1) How ecological stressors drive changes in free-living animals’ physiology and behavior, how this impacts reproduction and survival and how this drives changes in population dynamics and ultimately community structure. a) Particular focus has been on climate change, predation, food availability and habitat. b) Areas of physiology focus mostly on stress hormones (glucocorticoids) and sex hormones (testosterone, DHEA) and metabolic rate; behaviors focus mainly on phenology (timing of annually recurring events) and anti-predator and foraging behaviors. 2) How maternal stress may impact offspring physiology, behavior and fitness. If you are interested in joining our research group please contact me via email at mjsheriff@alaska.edu. I place a premium on analytical skills, writing ability, research experience, hard work, and enthusiasm. If and when you decide to contact me, please take some time and write a thoughtful letter (because this is more likely to generate a thoughtful response). Please send me your CV, GRE test scores (Canadian students don’t need to send this), and transcripts. Tell me a bit about your interests, and why you’re interested in working with our group. Posted: 5/29/13.

Pennsylvania State University: Graduate Research Assistantship (M.S. or Ph.D.) in Plant Science or Ecology, Department of Plant Science or Inter-College Degree Program in Ecology. Available: Fall, 2013.. Seeking an M.S. or Ph.D. student to participate in a interdisciplinary project focused on sustainable dairy cropping systems. Our overall goal is to develop more sustainable reduced-tillage feed, forage, and fuel production systems that integrate pest and soil management practices. The graduate candidate will focus on integrated weed management that reduces herbicide reliance, incorporates cover crops and other cultural and mechanical weed control tactics. In addition to field-based research, there will be opportunities to develop and deliver extension programs. Qualifications: B.S. or M.S. degree in plant or soil science, entomology, biological sciences, environmental sciences, ecology, or other agriculture-related discipline. Strong written and oral communication skills necessary. Minimum 3.0/4.0 GPA. GRE test scores are required. For additional information contact: Dr. Bill Curran, email: wcurran@psu.edu and phone: (814) 863-1014 (office) or (814) 574-0202 (mobile). Application: Send letter of interest, resume, and transcripts to: Dr. William S. Curran, Professor of Weed Science 116 ASI, Dept. Crop and Soil Sciences University Park, PA 16802. (814)863-7043 (Fax). Posted: 2/26/13.

Pennsylvania State University: I am seeking a PhD student interested in studying the management of eastern deciduous forests in the context of deer population management. This project provides an opportunity for a student to develop a dissertation topic in a range of research areas, such as adaptive resource management for deer and timber harvest management decisions, studying hunter behavior in the context of manipulated deer densities, and response of indicators plant species to changing environmental conditions (e.g., deer browse pressure or silvicultural activities). Penn State, Pennsylvania Game Commission, and DCNR Bureau of Forestry have initiated a research project to manipulate the abundance of deer and measure the response of forest vegetation in the context of deer and forest management. Four study areas of approx. 18,000 acres each in a treatment-control context will have deer populations manipulated. Deer populations will be monitored with satellite GPS-collared deer and genetic analysis of deer pellets to estimate abundance. In turn, forest vegetation conditions will be monitored across each study area as well as intensive vegetation monitoring where forest management activities occur. The primary goals of this research are to (1) identify the relative importance of the primary factors thought to influence forest vegetation conditions (e.g., deer herbivory, competing vegetation, lack of fire, soil acidification), (2)obtain a better understanding factors that influence the behavior of deer hunters and their motivations for acquiring and using antlerless harvest permits/licenses, and (3) test various measures (e.g., plant indicator species, browse intensity) believed to reflect the effect of deer herbivory on forest vegetation conditions. Qualifications: M.S. degree and GRE scores >50th percentile. Desirable skills in an applicant include the ability to work in a team setting, supervise technicians, and be well organized to oversee data collection across four study areas. Quantitative skills and experience with use of GIS/GPS technology necessary. Please send a cover letter describing your research interests, CV, and unofficial copies of transcripts to Duane R. Diefenbach (ddiefenbach@psu.edu). Please include contact information for 3 references. Funding is available for a student to begin in early 2013, although I am seeking a candidate who can start no later than July 2013. Posted: 1/25/13.

Pennsylvania State University: Two graduate positions will be available starting in the fall of 2013 in the Applied Population Ecology lab located in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management. Students will have the opportunity to choose between the graduate programs in wildlife and ecology. Ph.D. - Large-scale drivers of mourning dove demography This project will focus on determining how environmental factors, density, and harvest rates affect mourning dove population dynamics. The student will rely on more than a decade of recruitment and mark-recapture data collected from throughout the species’ range for analyses. The research is designed to support harvest management efforts for the species. In addition, there will be a unique opportunity to examine how local weather and climate influence population dynamics in locations across a species’ range. There will be a strong quantitative component to the project, including developing hierarchical models in a Bayesian framework to determine factors influencing population parameters and developing population models to be used in making predictions. The student will be expected to collaborate with and solicit input from personnel at the US Fish and Wildlife Service and state-agencies tasked with management of migratory dove populations. The ideal candidate will have a strong interest and skills in quantitative ecology. Applicants with previous experience in the following areas will be given priority: estimating demographic parameters (e.g., mark-recapture), implementing hierarchical models using MCMC, managing large databases, programming in R, GIS, decision-making for harvest management, and/or modeling climate change effects. An M.S. degree in Ecology, Wildlife Biology, Statistics, or other similar fields is strongly preferred. M.S. or Ph.D – Amphibian population dynamics The student will have a primary responsibility in establishing and coordinating field research at a series of replicated sampling sites in central Pennsylvania that will be used to study the population dynamics of red-backed salamanders. The work is to be coordinated with collaborators conducting parallel studies in Massachusetts and Maryland. The research will focus on understanding the population ecology of the species and using experimental manipulations to understand the potential impacts of changing climate on terrestrial salamanders. The student will be responsible for coordinating field work and supervising field technicians. There is potential for either an M.S. or a Ph.D. student to fill the position. Preferred qualifications include prior field experience, strong quantitative skills, and an interest in applied ecology. To apply: send a cover letter including a description of their research interests, CV including GRE scores and GPA, and names and contact information for 3 references to Dr. David Miller (dxm84@psu.edu). Review of applications will begin by Feb 1 and positions will remain open until filled. Posted: 1/24/13.

Pennsylvania State University: I am seeking a MS student to begin June 2013. This project is examining the effects of different management actions, including thinning and burning, on carbon dynamics in fire-prone conifer forests. This is a simulation-based project using growth-and-yield and biogeochemical modeling and does not include field research. The student will have the opportunity to work with an extensive data set to develop their research questions. Qualifications include a BS in ecology, environmental science, forestry, statistics or another quantitative discipline. The ideal candidate will be self-motivated and excited about improving our understanding of climate change mitigation and adaptation options in forest systems. Preferred qualifications include programming experience in R and/or C+. Students have the opportunity to choose between the graduate programs in forestry and ecology. If interested, please email a CV, unofficial transcripts, 1-page statement of research interests, and contact information for three references to Matthew Hurteau (matthew.hurteau@psu.edu) by November 16, 2012. Posted: 9/25/12.

Pennsylvania State University, DuBois: A graduate research assistantship (M.S.) is available starting in Fall 2013 in Penn State’s Department of Ecosystem Science and Management to study the influence of mycorrhizae and other site factors on oak regeneration dynamics in Pennsylvania’s Ridge and Valley Province. Ideal candidates will have a B.S. degree in forestry or closely related discipline, field experience, knowledge of eastern deciduous forest vegetation, competitive GRE scores, and strong written and interpersonal skills. Review of candidates will begin immediately. The selected candidate will be supported with a stipend and tuition remission. Interested students should contact Dr. Aaron Stottlemyer (ads175@psu.edu) and include a letter of research interest and experience, CV, undergraduate GPA, and GRE scores (if taken). See Forest Resources Graduate Program for more information and application instructions. Dr. Aaron D. Stottlemyer Penn State University, DuBois, Pennsylvania 15801. Posted: 4/11/13.

Plymouth State University: The Center for the Environment (CFE) and the Masters of Science Program in Environmental Science & Policy seek applicants for a unique and exciting graduate research assistant (GRA) position in watershed ecosystem services. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work with a statewide interdisciplinary team (including researchers from Dartmouth College and the University of New Hampshire) on a major NSF research project to better understand the environment and the complex interactions of the climate-ecological-human system as well as provide critical information for state decision makers. Ecosystems in New Hampshire and the surrounding northern forest region provide a wide range of services that are critical to the region's inhabitants and the high quality of life they enjoy. Ensuring that these benefits can be sustained into the future requires improved understanding of basic ecosystem processes and their interactions with changes in climate and land management. Students with environmental science & policy, economics, and social science research backgrounds and interests are encouraged to apply. Priority will be given to applications completed and received by Jan. 15, 2013. The project leaders have a strong commitment to enhancing research opportunities for under-served groups and we encourage individuals belonging to any perceived minority group to apply. The GRA includes an annual stipend and tuition coverage plus travel support for fieldwork and conferences. CFE facilitates interdisciplinary environmental research, education, and public engagement in the northern New England region. CFE engages in research and education in support of graduate student research and in meeting the needs of regional partners, such as the White Mountain National Forest, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Squam Lakes Association, NH Department of Environmental Services, and other environmental organizations. The PSU campus and the surrounding Lakes and White Mountains regions provide excellent facilities and an outstanding natural research laboratory. Please contact Dr. Shannon Rogers for more information about the position and the application process: shrogers@plymouth.edu. Posted: 11/14/12.

Portland State University: Graduate position: Landscape genetics of plants. The development of methods for the analysis of population genetic differentiation in the context of landscape features has provided insights into ecological processes such as dispersal. Plant species present unique opportunities and challenges for landscape genetic analyses, as the behavior of their associated biotic and abiotic dispersal vectors as well as the distribution of suitable habitat may affect patterns of genetic variation. Understanding how landscape features may facilitate or limit the dispersal of plants is particularly critical as climate change affects the distribution of suitable habitat. We are looking to recruit graduate students (MS or PhD) interested in plant ecological genetics and willing to participate in the development of methods in landscape genetics for the analysis of dispersal among plant populations. Experience with laboratory assays and data analyses for genetic markers, GIS analyses, and field ecological methods would be beneficial but not necessary. If interested, please send a letter of introduction to Mitch Cruzan (Cruzan@pdx.edu) that includes a brief statement of your background and your academic record, including GPA and GRE scores if available. Please include an essay outlining your research interests and a recent copy of your CV. Posted: 11/20/12.

Portland State University: PhD Position in Aquatic Ecology. The Strecker Aquatic Ecology Lab invites applications for a PhD student to begin Fall 2013, studying the effects of hydrologic alterations and climate change on freshwater ecosystem connectivity and ecology on the Columbia Plateau. This is a truly unique system with many opportunities to develop novel research questions. Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have a MS in ecology, biology, environmental science, or a related field. The candidate should possess excellent written and verbal communication skills, as well as knowledge of freshwater ecosystems and quantitative statistical methods. Potential students should review the application guidelines and deadlines for the PhD program, which is housed in the School of the Environment. Applicants should send: 1) a CV; 2) brief letter of interest describing your experience, qualifications, and research interests; 3) GRE scores and transcripts (unofficial); and 4) contact information for three references to Dr. Angela Strecker [strecker AT pdx.edu]. The candidate will be joining an exciting lab and department (Environmental Science & Mgmt) with numerous opportunities to enhance their career by working with ecologists and other scientists. Applications will be accepted until December 15th. Support is available from a combination of research and teaching assistantships. In addition, applicants are encouraged to apply for the Cascades to Coast GK12 fellowship, as well as the Ecosystem Services for Urbanizing Regions Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT). Tuition costs will be waived. Posted: 11/9/12.

Purdue University: Graduate student (PhD and MS) assistantships are available to conduct research in aquatic ecology in the Hoverman Lab. Research projects will focus on pond communities and explore the effects of natural and anthropogenic stressors on individuals, species interactions, and community structure and function. These projects will combine laboratory and mesocosm experiments with broad-scale field surveys. General research topics include: 1) Ecological and evolutionary importance of inducible defenses in prey 2) Ecology of emerging infectious diseases 3) Direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic chemicals on communities. Selected individuals will enroll in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. Minimum qualifications include a BS (for MS position) or MS (for PhD position) in Biology, Ecology, Wildlife, or related field; GPA of 3.2 or greater; and above average GRE scores (at least 50th percentile for quantitative and verbal; at least 4.0 for analytical writing). Assistantships include 12-month stipend, full tuition coverage, and insurance. Exact start date is negotiable (can start sometime from August 2013-January 2014). For full consideration, please respond by July 1, 2013 and submit CV, GRE scores (unofficial is fine), transcript (unofficial is fine), names and contact information for three references, and cover letter detailing research interests, related experience, and career goals to Dr. Jason Hoverman (jhoverm@purdue.edu, 765-496-3263). Posted: 5/6/13.

Purdue University: We are seeking a high-caliber, quantitatively-inclined student for an NSF-sponsored Center for Advanced Forestry Systems, M.S./Ph.D. assistantship in the Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC) in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. This individual will focus on the biometry of genetically superior black walnut plantations under varying silvicultural intensities. Additional topic areas (e.g., production ecology, tree physiology) will be investigated and tailored to the successful candidate's interest. The HTIRC is a research cooperative between industries, state and federal agencies including the USDA Forest Service, and Purdue. Its goal is to develop and provide technology transfer effort that will advance tree improvement of Central Hardwoods for increased forest productivity in hardwood restoration and reforestation programs. Candidates should have a GPA of at least 3.2 and GRE scores above the 50th percentile. Demonstrated experience in biometrics and/or coursework in statistics are highly desirable. Assistantships will be awarded at $17,520 (M.S.) and $20,105 (Ph.D.) per year and funding will be guaranteed for either two (M.S.) or three (Ph.D.) years. Applications are being taken immediately and the position will be filled as soon as a highly qualified candidate is identified. Please contact Dr. Saunders (msaunder@purdue.edu) with questions and prior to submitting materials to Purdue. Posted: 2/7/13.

Purdue University: We are seeking high quality, motivated individuals to be recruited in a NSF funded Macrosystems Biology PRIDE Project. This project uses a new functional-trait based research framework that incorporates all three major invasion components (i.e., the invader, the recipient system, and drivers that facilitate the invader) with the consideration of temporal progression and spatial dependency. Two postdoctoral fellows, 2 PRIDE Fellows (PhD), 6 Undergraduate Scholars, and 4 internships will be recruited to conduct invasive species research. All positions are available starting 2013. Applications from women and underrepresented minorities are highly encouraged. Inquiries on the position should be directed to Dr. Songlin Fei( sfei@purdue.edu). We seek two postdocs in this project. Postdoc one will study the linkages among invasion components and explore their cross-scale interactions and postdoc two will examine the functional traits associated with invasive species. Applications should include a letter of interest, CV and three references. We seek two PhD fellows to study the distribution pattern and traits of invasive species and the association with biological, physiographical, and social factors. Applications should include a letter of interest, resume, cumulative GPA, GRE scores, and letters from three references. Applications should reference to the fellowship in order to be considered. Deadline for fall 2013 admission is March 1, 2013. Internships: Four students (either undergraduate or graduate) will be recruited to spend 6-10 weeks at a USFS field station or at Purdue to work on this project. Applications should include a letter of interest, resume, cumulative GPA, and three references. Posted: 12/20/12.

Purdue University: Graduate fellowship in natural resource sustainability and resilience. We are seeking high quality, motivated individuals to be recruited in a USDA funded National Needs Fellowship (NNF) Program. The goal of this program is to educate outstanding and diverse Fellows with a focus on forest and agricultural sustainability and resilience. Three graduate fellowships at the M.S. level and one at the Ph.D. level will available starting at the fall of 2013. Potential research area in this NNF program includes: forest ecosystem resilience, impact of land use and land change on weeds and invasive species, sustainable water resources, sustainable agriculture and biofuel production, and socio-economic behavior and policy development. Inquiries on the position should be directed to Dr. Songlin Fei (sfei@purdue.edu). Applicants must be citizens or nationals of the US with good academic standing. Fellowships are awarded at $18,500 (M.S.) and $24,500 (Ph.D.), with tuition waiver and health care benefits. Applications should include a letter of interest, resume, cumulative GPA, GRE scores, and letters from three references. Complete instructions. Applications should reference the fellowship in order to be considered. Deadline: 1/15/13. Posted: 12/13/12.

Purdue University: A Ph.D. assistantship in wildlife ecology is anticipated for Summer-Fall 2013 in the Swihart lab. The successful candidate will engage in both field research and synthesis of existing data to test hypotheses about effects of agriculture on wild vertebrates. Field research may explore the role of species attributes, landscape composition/configuration, and/or land management on behavioral, population, or community-level responses to agriculture. Data synthesis will include meta-analysis of recently compiled results from a large, systematic literature review. Numerous opportunities exist for collaborative work in areas related to these two primary objectives. The successful candidate will have demonstrated interest and proficiency in vertebrate ecology and statistics. Familiarity with landscape ecology, agricultural crop production systems, and with R, ArcView and ArcGIS is helpful. Candidates should have a GPA of at least 3.2 and a cumulative V+Q GRE score of at least 1200 (308 revised). Purdue's Department of Forestry and Natural Resources is a broad environmental unit with nationally ranked programs in Ecology/Evolutionary Biology and Forest Science. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to participate in the department's interdisciplinary Quantitative Ecology group and university-wide interdisciplinary initiatives such as the Center for the Environment, Center for Ecological Sustainability, and Purdue Climate Change Research Center. Please email a CV and short (1-page) letter of interest, including cumulative GPA, GRE scores, and contact telephone numbers and email addresses for three references to rswihart@purdue.edu. Graduate stipends currently are $20,915 per year and include tuition waivers. All inquiries must be received by 5 January 2013 to be considered for admission. Rob Swihart, Professor and Head, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2061, rswihart@purdue.edu, 765-494-3590. Posted: 11/13/12.

Purdue University: The Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC), in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, is seeking outstanding candidates interested in working toward M.S. or Ph.D. degrees. Areas of research include the chemically-mediated host colonization and mating behavior of wood-boring insects affecting hardwood trees. Funding for the van Eck Scholarships is provided by the Fred M. van Eck Foundation for Purdue University whose purpose is to support research in the genetic improvement of high-value North American hardwood tree species. Ideal students should be highly motivated and enthusiastic about working in the areas of chemical and behavioral ecology. Candidates should have well-developed quantitative skills, knowledge and experience in the biological sciences, a GPA of at least 3.2 and a top-tier GRE score. Assistantships will be awarded at $18k (M.S.) and $20k (Ph.D.) per year. In addition, an annual budget ($10k) will be available for research support and a laptop computer will be provided for the duration of the scholarship. For admission for fall semester 2013, applications must be received by November 16, 2012 (M.S. and Ph.D). Interested individuals should contact me directly via email (mginzel@purdue.edu) to discuss their background, qualifications, and research interests. Please also provide a short (one page) letter of interest and a CV that includes cumulative GPA, GRE scores and contact information for at least three references. More information on this scholarship opportunity at htirc.org. If selected for a van Eck Scholarship, we will notify you to make formal application to Purdue. Posted: 10/12/12.

Purdue University: A PhD assistantship is available in the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. The assistantship provides tuition, monthly stipend, and health benefits. The project is a collaboration between HLA and the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science. The successful student will utilize stable isotopes to determine sources of nitrogen loss from container growing systems, including nitrification, volatilization, and immobilization. The successful candidate should have a good background in chemistry and preferably plant biology or similar disciplines. the student will manage his/her research project, conduct field, greenhouse, and laboratory studies, collect and statistically analyze data, effectively communicate orally and in writing, and publish results in grant and industry reports, and peer-reviewed journals. The ability to work with others in a team-oriented environment is essential. Applicants should have a BS degree from an accredited institution. Preference will be given to applicants with a degree in plant science with a strong chemistry background or interest in environmental chemistry. Qualified applicants should file application on line. See also: graduate programs. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Mike Mickelbart (mickelbart@purdue.edu). Posted: 8/1/12.

Radboud University Nijmegen: We are looking for 2 excellent PhD candidates for 4-year research projects on 'Animal Ecophysiology' and 'Population Dynamics of Aquatic Ectotherms'. Our Department of Animal Ecology and Ecophysiology is part of the Institute for Water and Wetland Research of the Radboud University Nijmegen (in the Netherlands) and part of the Centre for Animal and Plant Population Dynamics. Details about the research projects and the positions can be found on our website http://www.ru.nl/animalecology/ . We offer great research facilities and scientific atmosphere, and a maximum gross monthly salary of € 2,612. Please merge your motivation letter, CV and the names and addresses of two references into one PDF document (with the corresponding Vacancy number), and send it, until 31 August 2012, to pz@science.ru.nl. For more information on the vacancies you can contact: Dr. Wilco Verberk, +31 24 365 2131, W.verberk@science.ru.nl; Dr. Eelke Jongejans, +31 24 365 2114, E.Jongejans@science.ru.nl. Posted: 8/15/12.

Rice University: The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Rice (Houston, TX) invites applications for admission into our graduate program (MS and PhD). The department is home to a vibrant community of faculty, postdoctoral, graduate, and undergraduate scholars in ecology and evolution. Our program has particular strengths in population and community ecology, conservation biology, evolutionary ecology, and evolutionary genetics and genomics. The following faculty members are potentially accepting graduate students into their lab for Fall 2013: Amy Dunham – I am currently searching for students interested in the effects of altered functional diversity and habitat structure on species interactions and ecosystem processes. Michael Kohn – Our lab employs molecular and bioinformatics tools to study the evolutionary dynamics of genes and genomes in populations and species. Some of our research projects have implications for conservation biology or medicine. Tom Miller – Demography, population dynamics, plant-animal interactions, symbiosis, invasion biology, theory-data interface. Luay Nakhleh – Population genomics in bacteria; phylogenomics in eukaryotes; the role of neutral and adaptive forces in network evolution. Nik Putnam – Comparative genomics, genome rearrangement and structural variation, phylogenetics, population genomics, bioinformatics. Volker Rudolf – Community ecology, ecological networks, climate change, intraspecific variation, predator-prey interactions, cannibalism, host-pathogen dynamics. Evan Siemann – Population and community ecology, forests, grasslands, plant ecology, insect ecology, plant/herbivore interactions, biodiversity, conservation. We offer highly competitive financial support and light teaching requirements for graduate students. We are located in Houston, Texas, an exciting, diverse, and affordable city with world-class opportunities for dining, arts, and entertainment and access to diverse terrestrial and aquatic environments. Rice is located beside one of the country’s largest medical research centers, providing additional opportunities in bioinformatics and genomics. Completed applications should be received by January 10 to ensure full consideration. There is no application fee for US citizens and permanent residents. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact potential faculty advisors before applying. Complete information about the graduate program, including application instructions. Posted: 11/8/12.

Rice University: I am looking for highly motivated PhD students in community/population ecology starting September 2013 in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Rice in Houston, Texas. I will consider applicants who wish to pursue fundamental research on any aspect of population/community/evolutionary ecology. Research in the Rudolf Lab examines the ecological factors that generate and determine the structure, dynamics and functioning of natural communities. Current projects include 1) influence of individual variation (including size-structure and genetic variation) within populations on the diversity, dynamics, and functioning of natural communities, 2) linking climate change to the dynamics and structure of natural communities, 3) the role of infectious diseases for community dynamics and biodiversity, and 3) the evolutionary dynamics resulting from the interaction of cannibalism and diseases/parasitoids. Our group uses a variety of field and laboratory experiments in combination with modeling work. While most of my work focuses on aquatic (freshwater) systems using organisms that range from stream salamanders to dragonfly larvae to zooplankton, I am amenable to students developing projects in other study systems. Please see our departmental website for more information, including our research and graduate programs, and the recent addition of several outstanding new faculty complementing our strengths in community ecology and evolutionary biology. Research projects range from the ecology and evolution of interspecific interactions, conservation biology, invasive species, and climate change to genomics and speciation. Formal application materials for graduate school can be submitted using the above website. Interested students should send me an email and attach a copy of their CV and include an informal statement of their potential research interests. Volker Rudolf (volker.rudolf@rice.edu). Posted: 10/19/12.

Ryerson University: Graduate Assistantship available in Plant Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Biology. My lab is broadly interested in the evolution and conservation of plants, often focusing on plant hybridization and mating patterns. My research program broadly aims to understand the evolutionary consequences of global climate change, species invasions, and species rarity. More specifically, I study (1) the mechanisms regulating genetic diversity, phenotypic evolution, and population demography in rare and invasive plants and (2) how evolutionary processes (hybridization, adaptation) and properties (mating systems, genetic diversity) affect the ecological function of plant populations (e.g., reproduction, extinction). As such, my research touches on a variety of sub-disciplines, including conservation biology, agricultural ecology, and population dynamics using a combination of field, greenhouse, and eco-informatic approaches. Students are expected to develop their own independent projects but will also have opportunities to collaborate on funded investigations of hybridization, plant evolution, and ecological conservation in North American agricultural and natural plant ecosystems. Ryerson's Chemistry and Biology department program boasts an exceptionally active and growing faculty. Areas of emphasis include environmental and molecular biology. Year-round financial support is available for graduate students. Applications: I am accepting applications from prospective MSc or PhD students to start a graduate program in September. If you are interested, please email me (lesley.g.campbell@ryerson.ca) a statement of your research interests with your CV and the names and email addresses of at least 2 references. Posted: 7/23/12.

Sacred Heart University: The Environmental Systems Analysis & Management (ESAM), Professional Science Master’s Program is currently accepting applications for Fall 2013. Three Teaching Assistantships (Introductory Biology, Ecology) and two Research Assistantships (estuary restoration, horseshoe crab conservation) are available. The ESAM program offers an interdisciplinary master’s degree whose graduates will be well equipped to confront the challenging environmental problems of the future. Grounded in the basic sciences, the curriculum prepares students to understand the complex interactions between the living and non-living portions of the environment and the dramatic role that human activity has on determining the ultimate nature of the environment in which we live. A unique feature of the program is the employment of a case study/problem solving approach to instruction that will incorporate close teamwork. In addition, quantitative reasoning is embedded throughout the program, fostering the type of practical applied mathematics skills that professionals in the environmental field require to succeed. ESAM graduates will also have received extensive training in the use of modern analytical instrumentation and digital field data collection equipment in our newly renovated and equipped teaching and research laboratories. All students gain research and/or internship experience. Posted: 3/4/13.

St. Francis Xavier University: Interested in invasive species and environmental analyses? Interested in launching a career in invasive species biology, opening doors in academia, NGOs, or industry? Interested in building expertise in the growing fields of invasive species biology, fouling communities, or applied marine biology? Dr. Russell Wyeth and Dr. Cory Bishop in the Biology Department at St. Francis Xavier University (StFX, in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada) are accepting applications for an MSc student to start September 1, 2013. This position is fully funded at $18k for two years, and tuition waivers are also possible. The project is a collaboration with the Aquaculture Association of Nova Scotia and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), and is associated with the StFX Centre for Biofouling Research. The aquaculture industry throughout the Canadian Maritime provinces has been severely impacted by invasive tunicates, and there is keen interest in understanding the environmental conditions that would minimize the growth of these nuisance species. The student will spearhead surveys of sites having a range of invasive tunicate infestations to better understand the environmental factors that promote high vs low infestations. The results will help understand the spread of invasive tunicates and also help the aquaculture industry assess infestation susceptibility (both at existing and future sites). The work will entail digital image analyses of tunicate settlement and time series analyses of abiotic factors known to affect tunicate growth (light, temperature, pH, etc.). The successful candidate will have a strong record of academic achievement, evidence of accomplishment in undergraduate research, be willing to undertake multi-day field trips, and have a valid driver’s license. Competitiveness for externally funded scholarships is also an asset. Skills or expertise in any of the following would be beneficial: tunicate biology, biofouling communities, physical oceanography, marine field work, digital image analysis, and time series analyses. The student will be based at StFX, but work closely with DFO scientists and members of the aquaculture industry. For further information or to apply, please contact: Dr. Russell Wyeth, rwyeth@stfx.ca. Posted: 5/6/13.

San Diego State University: PhD student assistantship in Ecology: habitat use and links to human activities of Golden Monkey. A doctoral graduate student is sought to join an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional project "CNH: Sustainability of Payments for Ecosystem Services in Coupled Natural and Human Systems", which is newly funded by NSF's Coupled Natural and Human Systems Program (PI: Dr. Li An). For this PhD student assistantship position we are seeking a highly qualified student who will study golden monkey habitat occupancy (using camera trapping techniques) and human activity from Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve, China. Students interested in integrating natural and social science are encouraged to apply. Applicants should have strong quantitative skills (e.g., computer modeling, statistics, wildlife habitat analysis/modeling), excellent interpersonal skills and writing capacity, and willingness to work in a range of different international and interdisciplinary contexts (e.g., work on variable terrain in rural areas, or with people of varying background or culture). Salary and benefits are competitive. Application due date is Dec 15th. Applicants should visit the SDSU Ecology joint doctoral program and follow the application instructions there. In addition to following the Department's application procedure, interested individuals should email the following materials: (1) statement of professional goals, (2) resume (including contact information of at least three references), to Dr. Rebecca Lewison (rlewison@mail.sdsu.edu). Posted: 12/3/12.

San Diego State University: A doctoral graduate student is sought to join the Department of Geography in support of an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional project "CNH: Feedbacks between human community dynamics and socio-ecological vulnerability in a biodiversity hotspot". This PhD student will integrate GIScience, ecology, and socioeconomics to understand what factors may "lead to vulnerability of community forest socio-ecosystems to the catastrophic effects of rapid environmental change" (quote from the proposal). The student is expected to take a systems approach to understanding vulnerability and resilience in coupled natural and human (CNH) systems in many rural-to-urban transitioning societies. Specifically, the student will travel to the field site (the Chitwan Valley, Nepal) and work with scientists from other disciplines; s/he will develop and evaluate an agent-based model that integrates multi-scale and multidisciplinary data and serves as a platform for hypothesis testing, scenario envisioning, and policy recommendation. Applicants should have strong interests in computer modeling and GIScience (GIS and/or remote sensing). A background in landscape, ecosystem, and/or wildlife ecology as well as in social survey design and analysis is a plus. Strong quantitative and programming experiences (e.g., statistics; C++, Java, or python), excellent interpersonal skills and writing abilities, and a willingness to work in a range of international and interdisciplinary contexts are desirable. The ideal starting date will be the 2013 fall semester (specifics negotiable). The application materials must be received by February 1st, 2013. Applicants should follow the instructions at SDSU Geography doctoral programs. In addition interested individuals are encouraged to send the following materials to Dr. Li An (lan@mail.sdsu.edu): (1) statement of professional goals, (2) resume (including contact information of at least three references), (3) transcripts, and (4) GRE scores (TOEFL scores for applicants whose native language is not English). Scanned copies or photocopies of transcripts and GRE/TOEFL scores are acceptable initially. When contacting me, please put "Response to PhD Assistantship in NSF Chitwan Project" as your email subject to facilitate timely consideration of your inquiry or application. Posted: 11/13/12.

San Diego State University: A doctoral graduate student is sought to join an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional project "CNH: Sustainability of Payments for Ecosystem Services in Coupled Natural and Human Systems", which is newly funded by NSF (PI: Dr. Li An). This PhD student assistantship position aims to integrate GIScience, landscape ecology, and human socioeconomics for studying the dynamic interactions between Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) and the associated Coupled Natural and Human (CNH) system at Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve (FNNR), China for the endangered Guizhou golden monkey. The student is expected to take a systems approach to examine human-environment-policy interactions over time and space. Specifically, the student will travel to the field site, and will develop, evaluate, and use different statistical or simulation models to understand systems dynamics of the coupled natural and human system at FNNR and its reciprocal relationships with PES programs. The student should function well within a collaborative, interdisciplinary research team, with a willingness to consider and evaluate a range of methodological approaches. Applicants should have strong interests in GIScience (geographic information systems and/or remote sensing), landscape ecology, computer modeling, and forest/wildlife ecology. Strong quantitative skills (e.g., computer modeling, statistics,) and programming experiences (e.g., C++, Java, or python), excellent interpersonal skills and writing capacity, and willingness to work in a range of international and interdisciplinary contexts (e.g., work on variable terrain in rural areas, or with people of varying background or culture) are desirable. Interest in social survey is desirable. Salary and benefits are competitive. The ideal starting date will be the 2013 fall semester (specifics negotiable). We also seek an M.S. student in any one or combination of the following areas under the same NSF project: (1) golden monkey habitat analysis and modeling (using camera trapping data); (2) remote sensing of land cover and habitat change; (3) How PES affects the reciprocal relationships among human demography, livelihood, and the environment; and (4) participatory mapping of local people's resource extraction activities and the associated underlying mechanisms. Applicants should visit PhD position or MS position and follow the instructions there. In addition to following the Department's application procedure, interested individuals for either the PhD or M.S. position shall email the following materials to Dr. An: (1) statement of professional goals, (2) resume (including contact information of at least three references), (3) transcripts, and (4) GRE scores (TOEFL scores for applicants whose native language is not English). Scanned copies or photocopies of transcripts and GRE/TOEFL scores are acceptable initially. Contact information: Dr. L. An, Department of Geography, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4493. Email: lan@mail.sdsu.edu. When contacting me, please put "Response to PhD Assistantship in GIScience and Systems Modeling" or "Response to MS Assistantship in NSF project" as your email subject to facilitate timely consideration of your inquiry or application (more information). Posted: 9/25/12.

San Diego State University: A doctoral graduate student is sought to join an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional project "CNH: Sustainability of Payments for Ecosystem Services in Coupled Natural and Human Systems", which is newly funded by NSF's Coupled Natural and Human Systems Program (PI: Dr. Li An). For this PhD student assistantship position we are seeking a highly qualified student who will to integrate remote sensing, landscape ecology or conservation ecology, and wildlife habitat analysis/modeling using data from Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve, China. Specifically, the student will be expected to travel to the field site. The student will map/model land use and land cover (canopy fractional cover and land cover classification in particular), golden monkey habitat occupancy (using camera trapping techniques), and their change over space and time. Applicants should have strong interest or background in GIScience (remote sensing and GIS in particular) and forest/wildlife ecology. Strong quantitative skills (e.g., computer modeling, statistics), excellent interpersonal skills and writing capacity, and willingness to work in a range of different international and interdisciplinary contexts (e.g., work on variable terrain in rural areas, or with people of varying background or culture) are desirable. Salary and benefits are competitive. The ideal starting date will be the 2013 fall semester. Applicants should visit the SDSU-UCSB joint doctoral program and follow the instructions there. In addition to following the Department's application procedure, interested individuals shall email the following materials to Dr. An, Dr. Lewison, and Dr. Stow: (1) statement of professional goals, (2) resume (including contact information of at least three references), (3) transcripts, and (4) GRE scores (TOEFL scores for applicants whose native language is not English). Scanned copies or photocopies of transcripts and GRE/TOEFL scores are acceptable initially. Contact information: Dr. L. An (lan@mail.sdsu.edu), Dr. Rebecca Lewison (rlewison@mail.sdsu.edu), Dr. Douglas (Doug) A. Stow (stow@mail.sdsu.edu). When contacting us, please put "Response to PhD Assistantship in Ecology/Habitat Analysis" as your email subject to facilitate timely consideration of your inquiry or application. Posted: 9/10/12.

San Francisco State University: Two graduate student (M.S.) positions are available, including two years of stipend and tuition remission, in the Department of Biology. These students will be co-advised by Andy Zink and Vance Vredenburg and work directly on a project investigating the relationships between communal nesting in Batrachoseps salamanders and the spread of fungal pathogens. Students will be expected to combine laboratory work (sampling museum specimens, quantitative PCR) with field work on salamander behavior and ecology throughout California. Interested students should email their CV, unofficial transcripts, and GRE scores to Andy Zink at zink@sfsu.edu with SALAMANDER POSITION (MS) in the subject line of the email. Posted: 12/12/12.

Simon Fraser University: I (Dr. Elizabeth Elle) am looking for motivated PhD students (MSc students can be considered) to collaborate on pollination projects. Although much of the structure of the project will be up to you, areas where I have funding include explorations of how conservation of native bee biodiversity affects crop yield, the importance of pollinator identity and diversity for selection on floral traits in wildflowers, and possibly urban pollinator biodiversity/green city planning. Start dates are flexible, and SFU accepts students three times a year (Sept, Jan, May). To apply, send an email (eelle@sfu.ca) telling me about yourself, your interests and experience, and include a current CV. I’ll be at the ESA meeting in Portland if you’d like to meet. Posted: 8/2/12.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center: SERC offers the following fellowships to support research in residence at its facility in Edgewater, MD. This program is administrated through the Smithsonian Institution Office of Fellowships. Post-doctoral Fellowships are offered to scholars who have held the degree or equivalent for less than seven years. Senior Fellowships are offered to scholars who held the degree or equivalent for seven years or more. Applicants must submit a detailed proposal including a justification for conducting research in-residence at the Institution. The term is 3 to 12 months. Both fellowships offer a stipend of $45k per year plus allowances. Pre-doctoral Fellowships are offered to doctoral candidates who have completed preliminary course work and examinations. The applicant must submit a detailed proposal including a justification for conducting research in-residence at the Institution. Candidates must have the approval of their universities to conduct doctoral research at the Smithsonian Institution. The term is 3 to 12 months. The stipend is $30k per year plus allowances. Graduate Student Fellowships are offered to students formally enrolled in a graduate program of study, who have completed at least one semester, and not yet have been advanced to candidacy if in a PhD program. Applicants must submit a proposal for research in a discipline which is pursued at the Smithsonian Institution. The term is 10 weeks with a stipend of $6,500. Application Deadline: January 15. To ensure that proposed fellowship projects are appropriate for SERC, applicants are encouraged to coordinate with proposed SERC sponsors early on in preparing fellowship proposals. Posted: 10/26/12.

South Dakota State University: A graduate assistantship (M.S.) is available to select and validate the condition of regional reference sites and develop biological monitoring tools for wadeable perennial streams of the Northwestern Great Plains ecoregion in South Dakota. This project will utilize GIS-based watershed assessment tools and collect water quality, physical habitat and biological community data perennial stream sites to select and validate reference site condition. This project will be supported with a Graduate Research Assistantship in the Department of Natural Resource Management, and the student will be co-advised by Drs. Katie Bertrand and Nels Troelstrup, Jr. Current annual M.S. stipend levels are $17,899 per 12 months, plus graduate assistants pay only 1/3 in-state graduate tuition and fees. Financial support is available for up to 3.5 years, pending satisfactory progress. The position is available immediately. Qualifications: A B.S. degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, or other related disciplines is required. The ideal candidate will have experience in collecting field measurements and identifying fish to species. Superior writing and verbal communication skills, as well as skills in data analysis and geographic information science, are beneficial. The application deadline is May 24, 2013. Interested applicants are asked to e-mail (katie.bertrand@sdstate.edu) a cover letter stating why the prospective student is the best candidate for the position, a resume/CV, official or unofficial copies of transcripts, unofficial copies of GRE scores, and the names, titles, addresses (snail mail and e-mail), and phone numbers of three references. Posted: 5/1/13.

South Dakota State University: Ph.D. Assistantship: Does climate warming decouple food web interactions in Great Plains streams? A graduate assistantship is available to study how temperature and photoperiod interact to regulate food web interactions in prairie streams. We will use mesocosm and field experiments to advance our understanding of stream community ecology and develop predictions about the consequences of climate change. The graduate assistant will design experiments in collaboration with the principal investigators and will develop an integrated research, teaching, and service portfolio, building on a strong foundation of teaching experience in the undergraduate fisheries curriculum. SDSU is the Land Grant University and has a rich tradition in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences. This project will be supported with a Graduate Teaching Assistantship in the in the Department of Natural Resource Management, and the student will be co-advised by Drs. Brian Graeb and Katie Bertrand. South Dakota offers abundant opportunities for outdoor recreation, and SDSU is a valued part of the vibrant community of Brookings. Current annual Ph.D. stipend levels are $22k per 12 months, plus graduate assistants pay only 1/3 in-state graduate tuition and fees. Financial support is available for five years, pending satisfactory progress. The start date for the project is Aug. 1, 2013. Qualifications: An M.S. degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, or other related disciplines is required. The ideal candidate will have experience in conducting lab and field experiments. Preference will be shown to applicants who demonstrate expertise in teaching. Superior writing and verbal communication skills, as well as skills in leading and navigating successful collaborations, are essential. The application deadline is May 17, 2013. Interested applicants are asked to e-mail (brian.graeb@sdstate.edu and katie.bertrand@sdstate.edu) a cover letter stating why the prospective student is the best candidate for the position, a resume/CV, official or unofficial copies of transcripts, unofficial copies of GRE scores, and the names, titles, addresses (snail mail and e-mail), and phone numbers of three references. Posted: 4/25/13.

South Dakota State University: I am seeking a highly motivated and qualified individual wishing to pursue an M.S. degree in Biological Sciences at the Department of Natural Resource Management. A research assistantship ($13k/yr) is available for two years with a January 1, 2013 start date; graduate assistants receive a 2/3 reduction of tuition costs. The successful applicant will conduct research in the area of wetland or soil ecosystems, and research topics may include prairie pothole wetland hydrology, invasion of non-native Phragmites australis, effects of agricultural management on soil carbon fluxes, or GIS analysis of wetland ecosystem services. SDSU is a public institution located in Brookings, SD, with vibrant graduate programs in Biological Sciences, the Geographic Information Science Center of Excellence, and Wildlife & Fisheries. Applicants should have strong data management and computer skills as well as a background in ecology or environmental science. Interested students should send via email a resume with cover letter (include GPA and GRE scores) and transcripts (photocopy is acceptable) to Dr. Carol A. Johnston, Carol.Johnston@sdstate.edu. Suitable candidates will then be encouraged to submit a formal application to the graduate school. Posted: 9/6/12.

Southern Cross University: Fully-funded PhD Scholarship - How will changing detrital resources influence marine biodiversity and ecosystem function? Global losses of seagrasses and mangroves, eutrophication-driven increases in ephemeral algae, and macrophyte invasions have impacted marine detrital resources. This has important implications for marine ecosystems because detritus drives benthic production, and sustains food webs encompassing economically-important fisheries, threatened shore birds, and marine mammals. Detrital deposition also modifies the chemical and physical conditions of marine sediments, leading to changes in nitrogen and phosphorus cycling including the significant release of inorganic nutrients. This project will evaluate the consequences of changing detrital resources on benthic biodiversity, production, nutrient cycling, and denitrification. The project will involve a multi-disciplinary approach with ecological manipulative experiments, stable isotope tracer experiments, and cutting edge biogeochemical process measurements. The project will be undertaken in the Centre for Coastal Biogeochemistry at SCU, which received the highest rank of 5.0 in geochemistry in the most recent assessment of research excellence by the Australian government. The project will be supervised by Dr Brendan Kelaher, Professor Bradley Eyre and Dr Joanne Oakes. The successful applicant will be based at the SCU National Marine Science Centre at Coffs Harbour; a sub-tropical area with pristine surfing beaches, rainforests and extensive marine reserves. The position is open to national and international applicants. The successful candidate will need to have an Honours or Masters degree in marine ecology, biogeochemistry, or a closely related field. The project will involve boat work and extended periods in the field, sometimes in remote areas. The PhD scholarship will provide a tax free stipend of $24,653 pa (AUD) and tuition fees will be waived. Interested applicants should send their CV highlighting their research background to Dr Brendan Kelaher - (brendan.kelaher@scu.edu.au). Only short-listed applicants will be notified. The closing date for applications is May 20, 2013 but may be extended if the position is not filled. Starting date is flexible. Posted: 3/8/13.

Southern Illinois University: SIU Carbondale is offering 3 PhD fellowships in Watershed Science and Policy as part of NSF's Integrative Graduate Education Research and Training (IGERT) program. Fellowships are available to U.S. citizens and permanent residents (only) in any water-, river- or watershed-related field of study, including Geology, Hydrology, Geography, Engineering, Plant Biology, Zoology, Ecology, and other areas. Applicants should have a MS-level degree at the time of enrollment (direct PhD possible in cases of exceptional merit) and should have grades, test scores, and research records commensurate with one of NSF's most coveted fellowship awards. Fellowship benefits include $30,000/year stipend for two years, $10,500/year education allowance for two years, student laptops, and support for research and conference travel. Application deadline is May 1, 2013. Start date for the fellowship is August 19, 2013. For more information and the application, please visit http://www.igert.siu.edu or contact igert@siu.edu. Posted: 4/2/13.

Southern Illinois University: Funding is available for a M.S. Research Assistantship in Silviculture in Dr. Eric Holzmueller's Forest Management and Ecology Lab in the Department of Forestry. Current research focuses on the response of forest communities to management and natural disturbance (http://mypage.siu.edu/eholzmue). The assistantship carries a competitive stipend, tuition waiver, and health insurance for 2 years. Anticipated start date for assistantship is May 2013. Minimum qualifications include a B.S. degree in forestry, ecology, biology, or related field, 3.0 GPA, demonstrated writing ability, and >300 GRE (V+Q) score. Coursework in Central Hardwood silviculture and experience with GIS is preferred. For more information please contact: Dr. Eric Holzmueller, Associate Professor of Forest Management & Ecology, at eholzmue@siu.edu or (618) 453-3708. Posted: 3/22/13.

Southern Illinois University Carbondale: We are seeking a M.S. student in the Zoology Department to begin fall 2013. The student will work with Dr. Robin Warne and Dr. Justin Boyles to evaluate thermoregulation, thermal sensitivity, and homeostatic stress responses in birds and mammals as predictors of the susceptibility of species to climate change. This student will be involved with multiple experiments but will be encouraged to focus their research on one specific aspect of the project (e.g., muscle function, immune responses, or stress hormones). This project is at the interface of physiology and ecology, so students interested in both are preferred. The ideal student will be independent and highly motivated, have experience with both field and lab work, and have strong quantitative skills. The student will be supported on a teaching assistantship in the Department of Zoology with a stipend of ~$18k/yr. Applicants should have a B.S. in Biology, Ecology, or related discipline; strong quantitative skills; demonstrated writing ability; and competitive GPA and GRE scores. Interested students should send the following application material to Dr. Warne (rwarne@siu.edu): a cover letter, CV, unofficial transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references familiar with your academic abilities. Evaluation of application materials will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is found. Posted: 4/8/13.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville: Applied Plant Ecology: Assessment of Procedures for Temporary Stabilization of Soils During Transportation Construction. Dr. Peter Minchin is inviting applications from qualified students for a Research Assistantship in the Department of Biological Sciences, starting August 16, 2012. The successful applicant would be expected to enroll in the SIUE Graduate School and commence a Master of Science degree under Dr. Minchin’s direction in fall, 2012. Applicants should have completed a Bachelor’s degree in biology, environmental science or a related field and be interested in undertaking a two-year Master’s project in the general area of applied plant ecology. My lab focuses on applied community ecology, particularly the conservation and restoration of plant communities. The applicant would work on an existing project funded by the Illinois Center for Transportation, the aim of which is to assess plant species and site preparation methods for the temporary stabilization of soils during transportation construction in Illinois. Field experiments will be performed at four sites in Illinois and will involve several days of travel each month to set up plantings and collect data. The successful applicant must be prepared to undertake both physical work in the field as well as data preparation and analysis in the lab. A driver's license is essential and skills in data management and statistical analysis are highly desirable. The RA includes a monthly stipend and a full tuition waiver for 24 months. Funds are also available to cover travel during field trips. SIUE is situated on a beautiful 2,600 acre campus and is only 20 minutes from downtown St. Louis. Applicants should submit a letter of interest, Curriculum Vitae, transcripts and three professional references to: Dr. Peter Minchin (pminchi@siue.edu), Department of Biological Sciences, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, PO Box 1651, Edwardsville, IL 62026. GRE scores may also be submitted but are not required. Position number: GS13-2032. Posted: 7/6/12.

SUNY-ESF: Parasitology and Nutrition MS Position. One Graduate Assistantship will be available to start in August 2013 working on New England Cottontail (a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act) and Eastern Cottontail nutrition and parasitology. This position is part of a larger project examining population regulation of New England Cottontails in NY State, to inform management and restoration efforts. MS research will focus on winter sampling of body condition and collection of urine and scat samples for nutritional and parasite analyses. The most qualified applicants will have strong wildlife field skills, experience with molecular techniques, laboratory skills, and strong demonstrated skills in data analysis. Preferred qualifications include experience with laboratory parasitological analyses and/or nutritional work. Duties will include writing a study plan, implementing cottontail scat and urine sampling protocols, supervising technicians and undergraduate assistants, and preparing reports and presentations for scientific audiences. Qualifications: Applicants must have a B.S. in Wildlife, Conservation Biology, Biology, or similar area. Experience with field studies, including trapping and handling, of small or medium-sized mammals, molecular techniques, and laboratory work is highly desirable. The position is undergoing final budget approval by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. The successful applicant will teach for two fall semesters and be supported on a Research Assistantship for two spring semesters and one full year. Interested applicants should submit the following: letter of interest, names and contact information of three references, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores, and CV to: Dr. Sadie Ryan or Dr. Jonathan Cohen. Selected applicants will need to apply to the SUNY ESF Graduate School before final acceptance. Salary: $15k per year to start plus tuition and health benefits. Last Date to apply: April 1, 2013 Contact: Dr. Sadie Ryan (sjryan@esf.edu) and Dr. Jonathan Cohen (jcohen14@esf.edu). E-mail: sjryan@esf.edu(Preferred) Phone: 315-470-6757 (Ryan); 315-470-6737 (Cohen). Posted: 1/2/13.

SUNY-ESF: Ruth Yanai at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF) is recruiting students for the 2013 academic year. Preference will be given to those available to start with the 2013 summer field season in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Historically, ecosystem nutrient budgets have not included error propagation or reported confidence limits with estimates of elemental stocks and flows. QUEST (Quantifying Uncertainty in Ecosystem Studies) is a research network devoted to promoting the development and application of uncertainty analysis. We have made progress in the areas of forest biomass and stream loads and are also working on wet deposition and change in soil storage. There are research opportunities associated with each of these areas. In addition to the research projects with QUEST, there are opportunities for involvement in other projects associated with MELNHE (Multi-Element Limitation in Northern Hardwood Ecosystems) in the White Mountains. MELNHE sites are located at Bartlett Experimental Forest, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, and Jeffers Brook (USFS). Background in ecology, statistics, and programming would be valuable assets. Funding will consist of a combination of research and teaching assistantships (ability to TA in a General Chemistry lab would be a plus). Please review the websites above and contact Heather Engelman at forestecology@esf.edu if you are interested in applying. While preference will be given to those with the experience listed above, anyone with a sincere interest in the projects is encouraged to apply. Posted: 11/20/12.

SUNY-ESF: We are recruiting a PhD student for a USDA-funded graduate assistantship to work on “Beaver Impacts across the Northern Forest,” starting in May 2013 at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF) in Syracuse. The project goal is to model impacts to forest communities of beaver foraging at landscape scales (e.g., Adirondack Park, other Northern Forest regions) using ecological relationships developed at finer local scales (e.g., foraging intensity and distance from ponds and wetlands) and existing geospatial data. This project, which builds on pilot studies by the P.I.’s in the central Adirondacks, will allow forest managers to predict the spatial distribution, potential footprint and harvest intensity of beaver impacts within the Adirondacks, and compare them to other disturbances that affect forest health, timber productivity, recreation value, and delivery of ecosystem services such as biodiversity and carbon sequestration. The project team includes P.I.’s who focus on ecohydrology and riparian forest ecosystems (John Stella), wildlife and landscape ecology (Jacqueline Frair) and geospatial modeling and statistics (Eddie Bevilacqua). Position requirements include a master's degree in natural resources, ecology, wildlife biology, statistics or related field. Strong quantitative skills are required, including excellent GIS skills and statistics; training in maximum likelihood and/or Bayesian methods are desirable. Candidates must have scientific writing experience, with preference given to those with published papers in peer-reviewed journals. Must work effectively with natural resource agencies and be comfortable giving public and academic presentations. The position comprises a combination of teaching and research assistantships, with an annul stipend, full tuition waiver, and expenses for field work provided. Qualified candidates should send a letter of interest, CV, GRE scores, master's degree transcripts, a writing sample (manuscript, report, etc), and contact information for 2-3 references to Dr. John Stella (stella@esf.edu) by Dec. 20, 2012. More information: SUNY-ESF’s Graduate Program in Environmental Science. Posted: 11/19/12.

Station d’Ecologie Expérimentale de Moulis/University of Groningen: We are looking for a candidate to fill a PhD position in theoretical ecology. The project is titled "Competition theory with a dominance/tolerance trade-off: a mathematical approach to predict species abundances and distributions. Model development, analysis, and application to data on salt marsh." The supervisors are Claire de Mazancourt and Bart Haegeman, Station d’Ecologie Expérimentale de Moulis, and Rampal S. Etienne, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. The student will be based at the Centre for Biodiversity Theory and Modelling, Station d’Ecologie Expérimentale de Moulis, Ariège, France, with visits to the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. More information (in French) or contact Claire de Mazancourt (claire.demazancourt@ecoex-moulis.cnrs.fr) or Rampal Etienne (r.s.etienne@rug.nl). We are looking for a candidate with - good communication skills in English - experience in theoretical ecology or a background in mathematics/physics or similar and affinity for biology. Interested candidates should apply before 31 MAY 2013 by sending a CV and the names of three references to Claire de Mazancourt (claire.demazancourt@ecoex-moulis.cnrs.fr) or Rampal Etienne (r.s.etienne@rug.nl). Posted: 5/29/13.

Stephen F. Austin State University: One MS Graduate Assistantship is available in the Department of Biology for a highly motivated student to work on behavioral and sensory ecology of fishes. The student will contribute to a project linking visual system physiology and genetics to sexual selection and behavioral isolation in colorful freshwater fishes. This project is integrative and students with broad training in biology are encouraged to apply. The student will also have the opportunity to develop an independent thesis project related to this or other topics of interest in behavioral ecology, conservation biology, or reproductive ecology. This position will be funded through a combination of teaching and research assistantships and include stipend and opportunities for summer salary. Qualifications: BS in Biology or related field. GRE (verbal and quantitative) with acceptable scores that vary in coordination with overall GPA, and a GPA of 3.0 in Biology and related science courses are minimum requirements. More information on admissions. To apply please send a statement of interest and a CV/resume of related research, coursework, GPA, GRE, and any other relevant experience to Jennifer Gumm (gummj (at) sfasu (dot) edu. Posted: 6/28/13.

Stockholm University: There is one PhD student position and two post docs currently announced at the Department of Zoology to work in the large-scale project "Insect life cycle genomics and adaptation in the wild", primarily on the butterfly Pieris napi. The supervisor/host is Chris Wheat. Last date for application April 2 (for the PhD) and April 8 (for the post docs). For more information see the full job ad at: Department of Zoology - Vacancies, Reference number SU FV-0851-13 and SU FV-0850-13 (postdoc) or FV-0796-13 (PhD). Posted: 3/22/13.

Stockholm University: PHD POSITION in evolutionary ecology at the Department of Botany. The project will investigate the environmental factors driving variation in phenotypic selection on timing of reproduction in iteroparous plants via interactions with antagonistic and mutualistic animals. An important part of the project is to assess the effects of interactions on lifetime fitness using demographic information, and to calculate estimates of selection based on lifetime fitness. The project will also use long-term data sets to estimate individual-specific reaction norms between timing of reproduction and climate as well as selection on these reaction norms. The project will initially focus on a model system consisting of a perennial plant (Lathyrus vernus), its’ antagonists (large mammalian herbivores and pre-dispersal seed predators) and mutualists (bumble-bee pollinators). The methods will consist of experiments in the field, common garden and greenhouse as well as correlational field studies. The analytical framework will consist of phenotypic selection analyses to link traits with fitness components and demographic analyses, such as integral projection models (IPMs), to link fitness components with lifetime fitness. Qualifications: MSc or similar degree in ecology or related disciplines (at least 4 years education including a minimum of 10 weeks ecology courses). We seek a candidate with good knowledge of ecological and evolutionary theory, analytical capacity and good skills in English. Previous experience of field and or experimental work is desirable. How to apply: Application should include (1) a letter stating why the applicant should be considered a strong candidate for the position, (2) a CV, (3) one copy of the master thesis (and other documents supporting your competence and suitability for the position), (4) names, with e-mail address and telephone numbers, of two reference persons, and (5) possible other documents that the applicant wants to be considered. You are welcome with your application, labeled with the reference number SU 461-32-2012, and it should be received no later than November 20, 2012, to: Department of Botany; Registrar Leila Ahonen; Stockholm University; SE-106 91 STOCKHOLM; SWEDEN, or by e-mail to: leila.ahonen@botan.su.se. Posted: 10/18/12.

Stony Brook University: Antarctic seabird ecology. The Lynch Lab is currently accepting Ph.D. students with one (or more) of the following skill sets: •Strong quantitative skills, mathematical modeling or applied statistics experience; Experience with R strongly preferred •GIS and/or remote sensing imagery experience; Experience with ArcGIS required, experience with ENVI/IDL and/or eCognition a plus •Extensive field experience studying marine mammals or seabirds; Experience with vessel-based research and polar climates a plus A Master’s degree preferred but not required. For projects involving quantitative or geographic analysis, those with backgrounds in physics, computer science, mathematics, or statistics encouraged to apply. Students will have the opportunity to structure their thesis research around a well-established long-term Antarctic research program called the Antarctic Site Inventory that uses vessel-based seabird monitoring to understand the impacts of climate change and other anthropogenic disturbance on Antarctic ecosystems. Financial support may be available through a combination of research grants, graduate fellowships, and teaching opportunities. Application and acceptance occurs through the Ecology & Evolution Department but applicants interested in the Lynch Lab are encouraged to send their CV and a cover letter describing research interests to Dr. Heather Lynch at heather.lynch@stonybrook.edu in advance of the departmental deadline. Posted: 10/2/12.

Stony Brook University: The Graduate Program in Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University (Long Island, New York) is recruiting doctoral and master's level graduate students for Fall 2013. The following faculty members are seeking graduate students: H. Resit Akcakaya http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/akcakayalab/ Stephen B. Baines http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/baineslab/ Michael A. Bell http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/belllab/ Liliana M. Dávalos http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/davaloslab/ John Fleagle http://anat.stonybrook.edu/people/facultypage/fleagle Lev Ginzburg http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/ginzburglab/ Catherine Graham http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/grahamlab/ Jessica Gurevitch http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/gurevitchlab/ Brenna M. Henn http://www.stanford.edu/~sylpha/Brenna_Henn/ Heather Lynch http://lynchlab.wordpress.com/opportunities/ Dianna K. Padilla http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/padillalab/ Joshua Rest http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/restlab/ John True http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/truelab/ The deadline for receipt of all application materials for the PhD program is January 15, 2013. However, prospective students are strongly encouraged to contact a faculty member well before the deadline, with a detailed description of specific research questions that interest them, their educational and research background, and any special skills, training or experience they may have. In addition, early submission of the formal application is encouraged to ensure full consideration for available fellowships. The deadline for receipt of all application materials for the master's program is April 15, 2013. For additional assistance, please contact our Graduate Program Coordinator, Lee Stanley, alethia.stanley@stonybrook.edu. Posted: 9/25/12.

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry: One Ph.D. Graduate Assistantship in Environmental and Forest Biology will be available to start in August 2013 to work on New England Cottontail (a Candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act) and Eastern Cottontail interactions, demography, and habitat associations. Graduate research will focus on radio-telemetry and population genetics-based studies of dispersal, survival, recruitment, and habitat use of the two species. Successful applicant will teach for two fall semesters and be supported on a Graduate Research Assistantship for two spring semesters and two full years. The most qualified applicants will have strong wildlife field skills, experience using molecular techniques, and strong demonstrated skills in data analysis. Duties will include writing study plans, implementing cottontail trapping and telemetry surveys, habitat sampling, genetic sampling and analyses, supervising technicians and undergraduate assistants, and preparing reports and presentations for scientific audiences. Qualifications: Applicants must have a M.S. in Wildlife, Conservation Biology, Biology, or similar area. Experience with field studies, including trapping and handling, of small or medium-sized mammals and molecular techniques is highly desirable. Interested applicants should submit the following: letter of interest, names and contact information of three references, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores, and CV to: Dr. Jonathan Cohen or Dr. Sadie Ryan. Selected applicants will need to apply to the SUNY ESF Graduate School before acceptance. Application emails: jcohen14@esf.edu; sjryan@vt.edu Salary: Teaching assistantship for first two fall semesters, research assistantship (starting $20k/yr) first two spring semesters and final two years, tuition waiver, health benefits Last Date to apply: March 10, 2013 Contact: Dr. Jonathan Cohen (jcohen14@esf.edu) and Dr. Sadie Ryan (sjryan@esf.edu). E-mail: jcohen14@vt.edu(Preferred) Phone: 315-470-6763 (Cohen); 315-470-6757 (Ryan). We are also still accepting applications to an MS position in Parasitology and Nutrition on this project. Posted: 1/29/13.

Swansea University: A fully funded NERC PhD studentship is available, working with Dr John Griffin and Dr Mike Fowler. We are looking for an enthusiastic, highly motivated student interested in pushing boundaries in an exciting and important area of ecological research. This ambitious PhD project is aimed at extending our understanding of Biodiversity - Ecosystem Functioning relationships across spatial scales. Human activities are driving major declines in global biodiversity. Understanding how biodiversity loss will affect the ecosystem functions and services that underpin human well-being is a key question in ecological, conservation and sustainability sciences. See the full job ad for further details on the project and how to apply. The studentship will be based within the Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research, situated in the Department of Biosciences at Swansea University, UK. The student will benefit from the complementary expertise of supervisors Drs John Griffin (empirical approaches) and Mike Fowler (ecological modelling), gaining multidisciplinary skills in field ecology, statistics and modelling. Requirements: Applicants should have or expect to receive a good BSc degree (First or Upper Second Class) in Biology or a related discipline, with good numerical skills and an enthusiasm for challenging themselves academically. Experience in any aspect of this project (field work, statistical/mathematical modelling, or computer coding skills) and MSc/MRes qualifications are desirable but not critical – training will be provided where required. Informal enquiries are encouraged before application: please contact either Dr John Griffin (j.n.griffin@swansea.ac.uk; tel +44 (0)1792 295311) or Dr Mike Fowler (m.s.fowler@swansea.ac.uk; tel +44 (0)1792 295443). Closing date: 11 April 2013. These studentships are open to candidates who have been ordinarily resident in the UK for three years preceding the date of application. Posted: 2/20/13.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: A PhD-position for four years is available on ecosystem services and biological control in agricultural crops in the Department of Ecology at SLU (Uppsala, Sweden). The deadline for applications is 18 February 2013. More details or contact Riccardo Bommarco. Posted: 12/20/12.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: A new PhD-position for four years is available in community ecology on "Impact of global change on biotic interactions in grasslands" in the Department of Ecology at SLU in Uppsala, Sweden. The deadline for applications is 13 August 2012. More details or contact Riccardo Bommarco. Posted: 7/9/12.

Syracuse University: MS and PhD positions in Plant Evolutionary Biology beginning September 2013 are available in the Friedman Lab. Our lab is using a combination of ecological and genomics approaches to address questions related to the evolution of reproductive transitions in plants. Our work focuses on understanding the enormous diversity in plant reproductive strategies by combining approaches in evolutionary ecology, population and ecological genetics and genomics. We use a variety of study systems to address these questions, including the seep monkeyflower (Mimulus guttatus), ragweed, meadow-rues, and sedges, and combine field work, greenhouse and growth chamber studies with genetic and genomic analyses. We are looking for highly motivated graduate students, with a strong background in evolution and ecology. Syracuse University Biology has a strong and growing research faculty, as well as a diverse and interactive group of people interested in plant ecology and evolution. In addition, we share a campus with SUNY-College of Environmental Science and Forestry, providing lots of opportunity for interaction. Interested students should email Dr. Jannice Friedman (friedman@syr.edu), providing a statement of your research interests and a CV that includes GPA, GRE scores and the names and contact information for at least 2 references. More information about the Graduate program. For full consideration, applications to the department should be received by December 31, 2012. Posted: 11/26/12.

Technische Universität München: PhD position in Soil Science "Organic matter composition in the subsoil: Contribution of root litter and microbial-derived compounds", subject to final approval of funding, with the Lehrstuhl für Bodenkunde (Chair for Soil Science). The earliest starting date is April 1st 2013. This position gives a 3-year opportunity to combine fieldwork and new conceptual applications with state of the art analytical techniques in a lab focusing on the fate and stabilization of soil organic matter. The group (Prof. I. Kögel-Knabner) is located at Freising-Weihenstephan, nearby Munich in southern Bavaria. Although over 50% of the global terrestrial organic carbon pool is found in soils below 30 cm depth, the subsoil below the A-horizon is generally not considered in carbon turnover models and has received far less scientific attention than the topsoil, largely because subsoil processes related to carbon storage and turnover have been underrated in the past. One main reason is that the investigation of subsoil phenomena and processes poses major methodological, instrumental and analytical challenges. This project will face these challenges with a trans-disciplinary team of soil scientists applying innovative approaches and considering the magnitude, chemical and isotopic composition and d14 C-content of all relevant subsoil C-flux components and C-fractions. The main aim will be to separate the main sources of subsoil organic carbon (root; litter, microbes) by determining its composition at different distances to a tree. For the very first time, micro-scale processes in the subsoil will be tracked in intact soil compartments. The student will be trained and work with a variety of cutting edge analytical methods, as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Required: A diploma/master's degree in forest science, agronomy, geosciences, geoecology, environmental sciences or a related discipline is required. Fieldwork experience in geological and/or ecological sciences and laboratory research experience in geochemistry or biogeochemistry would be a desirable foundation. The candidate should be highly motivated, team-oriented and willing to work with advanced analytical techniques, such as gas-chromatography (GC-MS) NMR spectroscopy (NMR) and NanoSIMS. Applications for this position will be accepted immediately (until January 20th), via email to: Dr. Carsten W. Müller (carsten.mueller@wzw.tum.de). Subject to final approval, anticipated earliest date 1st of April 2013. Posted: 12/13/12.

Texas A&M University: The Department of Ecosystem Science and Management invites applications for several graduate fellowships available to qualified incoming Ph.D. students matriculating in fall 2013. These awards are available for students interested in the ecology and management of grasslands, savannas, forests, and other major ecosystem types. Each fellowship includes a $25k/year stipend (paid in monthly increments), tuition, and health insurance benefits for one to three years. Our department also participates in the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Minority Ph.D. Program, which provides additional scholarship support to underrepresented minority students. All potential applicants are strongly encouraged to communicate with prospective faculty advisors. Application Deadline: February 15, 2013. For more information on eligibility and application requirements, visit essm.tamu.edu/academics/graduate/financial-support/ or contact Sara Eliason, skeliason@tamu.edu. Posted: 1/7/13.

Texas A&M University: A PhD graduate student assistantship is available starting in Fall 2013 in the Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University. The project will involve spatial analysis and epidemiological modeling of West Nile virus to understand mechanisms of maintenance and amplification. A B.S. and M.S. in a closely-related field, strong quantitative background including statistical skills using Program R, and experience with GIS are preferred. Interested applicants should submit the following: letter of interest, CV, contact information for 3 references, unofficial transcripts, and GRE scores as a single document (PDF or word) to Dr. Gabriel Hamer (ghamer@tamu.edu) with the subject line including PHD POSITION. In particular, I am recruiting outstanding candidates to nominate for the TAMU Merit and Diversity Fellowships. Fellowship requirements: U.S. Citizen or permanent resident, Preferred minimum GPA score of 3.5, Preferred minimum quantitative and verbal GRE scores of 155, For the Diversity Fellowship (but not Merit Fellowship), applicant must be from an underrepresented background. Deadline to be considered for fellowships will be Dec. 21, 2012. Posted: 12/10/12.

Texas A&M University: Currently recruiting a PhD student in quantitative population biology. A student is expected to start either in spring or fall 2013. The research should be on the use of modern statistics or mathematical models in conservation biology, ecology, marine biology, or fisheries sciences although a specific research topic (e.g. organisms, questions, and objectives) is flexible. Please note that field sampling or wet-lab support will NOT be provided. If you are interested, please contact Masami Fujiwara, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences. Posted: 8/7/12.

Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi: I am seeking a motivated student to fill a graduate assistantship at the Ph.D. level. Student will have the option of applying to the Marine Biology Ph.D. program or the Coastal, Marine System Science Ph.D. program. The position is available beginning in January 2013, June 2013, or August 2013 (preference will be given to applicants willing to arrive in January 2013). Current lab research focuses on understanding the ecological mechanisms controlling estuarine/coastal phytoplankton blooms, planktonic food web interactions, and effects of climatic and anthropogenic change on coastal ecosystems. Ample resources are available for field sampling, experimental (mesocosm & laboratory) approaches, and or synthesis/modeling of existing data. The student will be housed at the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies. Interested students should preferably hold a M.S. degree in ecology, marine science/oceanography, microbiology or a related field and possess strong quantitative skills. Potential applicants with only a B.S. degree should have at least 2 years of research experience in an area related to plankton or estuarine ecology and evidence of strong writing and presentation skills. The graduate assistantship will have an excellent stipend relative to the cost-of-living. To be considered for the position, please email me, Dr. Mike Wetz at michael.wetz@tamucc.edu. Along with a letter of interest, please send your C.V., unofficial transcripts and GRE scores. Screening of applications will begin immediately and the position will be filled as soon as a qualified applicant is identified. Posted: 9/10/12.

Texas A&M University-Kingsville: Multiple M.S. graduate assistantships in plant biology/ecology, ecological modeling and ecoinformatics, a Joint Program of the Institute for Sustainable Energy & the Environment and the Department of Biological and Health Sciences. These positions will be available from September 2013. The student has the option to begin study in September 2013 or January 2014. Applicants are encouraged to apply as soon as possible, but no later than May 31, 2013 for starting in the fall semester 2013. Qualifications: A very strong interest in the study of plant ecology, plant ecology, ecological modeling and ecoinformatics with strong writing and quantitative skills and excellent interpersonal skills. Students should have B.S. degree in biology, botany, forestry, ecology, environmental science or related field (such as computer science, geography) with competitive GPA and GRE (if applicable, TOEFL) scores. Interested applicants are encouraged to send CV and a cover letter detailing qualifications, previous research experience and research interests to Dr. Weimin Xi: wxi3@wisc.edu. Posted: 4/9/13.

Texas State University: Open immediately: Research/teaching scholarship available for a qualified MS student at Texas State University – San Marcos. The focus of this research opportunity is the recent tree die-off event that affected the state of Texas in the aftermath of the drought years of 2009 and 2011. The student will travel throughout west and central Texas and collect field data to quantify tree mortality rates and their site-specific correlates. Interested students are invited to participate in working with a dynamic vegetation model to improve the prediction of drought-related tree mortality events. For more information contact Dr. Susan Schwinning (schwinn@txstate.edu) and visit the Schwinning Lab website. Posted: 7/1/13.

Texas State University: MS and PhD Positions – Population Biology and Ecological Speciation of Cynipid Gall Formers. The Ott lab has opportunities available for MS and PhD students interested in the evolution of the interactions of host specific insects with their host plants and natural enemies. Base funding is provided by renewable teaching assistantships and qualified students can expect substantial scholarship assistance. For information on ongoing and potential projects, program information, support, student outcomes, and application details visit the Ott lab site. Interested students are invited to contact JimOtt@txstate.edu. The Department of Biology offers a strong environment in population biology and population ecology. Posted: 6/28/13.

Texas State University: M.S. Assistantship. I am currently accepting one graduate student interested in metacommunity ecology of small mammals. Applicants should be independent and highly motivated. Quantitative skills (or the desire to hone these) are highly preferred. The work will involve extracting information from large databases and previously published data to conduct comparative analyses about the structure of small mammal metacommunities. The research will not involve fieldwork but opportunities for participation in fieldwork activities will exist to complement the training of the potential graduate student. Current research in my lab examines the relationship between rodent community patterns and prevalence of disease agents (i.e., Hantavirus, Borrelia, Trypanosoma) in reservoir species and how this changes along environmental and disturbance gradients. The ultimate goal is to generate models of predictive value of Emergent Infectious Diseases outbreaks and a main question imbedded within is to determine the role of small mammal diversity and community composition as a factor of disease spread. The metacommunity study will be part of this overall effort and ultimately the research will be integrated into questions pertaining to disease ecology. The Biology Department has a M.S. program in wildlife ecology with an emphasis on the application of ecological principles to studies in wildlife ecology and natural resource management. The main campus is conveniently located in central Texas along the I-35 corridor and close to both Austin and San Antonio. Details about the entry requirements for this graduate program. Student salary will be through either grant support or as an instructional assistantship (TA), or a combination of both. Applicants need to meet the entrance requirement for the program, department and university. The proposed start date is for Fall 2013 (university application deadline is June 15) but if no suitable student is found then the start date would be for spring 2014. For more details about this opportunity you can visit my website (Ivan Castro-Arellano), where I have a description of my research and past publications. Interested individuals should email me, Ivan Castro-Arellano, to ic13(at)txstate.edu with the subject line: Prospective Student. Please attach a single pdf document that includes a brief description of your research interests and why you would like to join the lab, a CV (including GPA and GRE scores), a scanned copy of your transcript, and contact information for two references. Posted: 4/5/13.

Texas Tech University: The Griffis-Kyle lab and the TTU-Waco Program invite applications for a funded PhD position in Wetland Ecology in the Natural Resources Management Program. Start date summer or fall 2013.We welcome inquiries from motivated students interested in how climate change or other stressors affects wetland dependent organisms. Students will conduct field work at the Lake Waco Wetlands in Waco Texas and work closely with the TTU-Waco program. There is lab space and a natural area available on site to create an integrated research project combining laboratory and field ecology. Additionally, our partnership with the CRASR Institute of Baylor University can allow for use of their research facility onsite, including pond mesocosms. Qualifications: We are looking for highly motivated and creative students with good communication skills (oral and written) that are comfortable working independently and that have previous experience. Applicants will need a M.S. to be considered. Students should be interested in collaborating with a community college and mentoring undergraduates in research. Preference will be given to students with previous experience working with amphibians or freshwater invertebrates, field skills, competitive GRE scores, undergrad GPA (>3.0), and grad GPA (>3.5). Interested applicants should email Dr. Kerry Griffis-Kyle (kerry.griffis-kyle@ttu.edu) and have “PhD opportunity” in the subject line. Please include in the email: 1. How this position will help you fulfill your career goals and why I should hire you 2. Resume or CV including pertinent work experience 3. Unofficial transcripts 4. GRE scores 5. Contact information for three references 6. Address, phone, and email. For additional information: TTU Graduate School. Posted: 5/3/13.

Texas Tech University: A Graduate Research Assistant (M.S. or Ph.D.) is needed at Texas Tech University to investigate molecular mycorrhizal ecology of North American orchid species. The position will begin in Summer 2013. Requirements: 1. B.S. and/or M.S. degree in an ecology-based discipline in Plant or Biological Sciences, or a closely related field. 2. Experience in studying fungi and plants. Experience with mycorrhizae, especially of orchids, is preferred. 3. Laboratory experience in molecular biology and sterile culture techniques. Familiarity with analyses of data is highly desirable. Strong data- and record-keeping skills. 4. Ability to efficiently conduct molecular biology work in the laboratory, strong organizational and coordination skills, and affinity for communicating effectively in English in writing and verbally. 5. A strong work ethic and an ability to work non-regular hours, as needed. 6. Willingness to cheerfully work independently and as a productive member of a research team. 7. Ability to complete all admission requirements. Competitive salary. Assistantships include payroll fringe, and partial tuition payment. Application: Please submit to Dr. Jyotsna Sharma (jyotsna.sharma@ttu.edu): 1. A statement of research interest describing past experience and future goals. Please specifically address how your experience, skills, and goals match the position description and requirements listed above; 2. Curriculum vitae, including names, complete address, phone, and e-mail for at least three references; 3. Academic transcripts; 4. GRE scores; and 5. TOEFL scores (if applicable). Posted: 4/2/13.

Texas Tech University: The Bernal lab is looking to recruit 1-2 graduate students for either masters or doctoral work beginning in fall 2013. The applicant(s) will be part of a team investigating interspecific eavesdropping of mating signals by frog-biting midges at multiple levels of analysis. Applicants should be independent, highly motivated, and some research and/or field experience with insects would be a plus. Funding will be provided either as teaching assistantships or fellowships, depending on student background and availability. Research in the Bernal lab generally addresses questions about behavioral ecology about signal function and evolution by performing experiments within a naturalistic context. Specific research topics have included a wide array of ecological and evolutionary questions. If interested, please send by email (ximena.bernal@ttu.edu) a statement of research interests, CV, and an unofficial transcript plus your GRE scores. Applications received before Jan 10th will be considered. Posted: 11/14/12.

Texas Tech University: The Department of Natural Resources Management is seeking several highly motivated, talented and hard-working graduate students (M.S. and Ph.D.). This study will be conducted in north-central New Mexico in collaboration with the New Mexico Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Students will develop the focus of their research within the larger project goals of determining the influence of large-scale forest restoration treatments on vegetation and large mammal resource selection, space use and foraging ecology. Selected students will enter the graduate program in the Department of Natural Resources Management for the January 2013 semester. Candidates must have a B.S. degree (M.S. students) or M.S. degree (Ph.D. students), in Wildlife Ecology, Plant Ecology, or a related field, a GPA exceeding 3.0, and competitive GRE scores. Prior experience conducting field research on vegetation monitoring, large mammals, working in remote locations and experience with radio telemetry is preferred. GIS experience is also preferred. Field work will require hiking 3-6 miles/day over rough terrain and occasional camping in the backcountry. Students will be expected to present research results at professional conferences, publish research results in peer-reviewed scientific outlets, and assist with preparation of agency reports and grant proposals. To apply, please email a single PDF file that includes a letter of interest describing your experience as it relates to this project, a CV; transcripts, GRE scores (unofficial copies are fine), and the name and contact information of 3 references to Dr. Robert Cox (robert.cox@ttu.edu). Posted: 9/24/12.

Texas Tech University: An M.S. Graduate Research Assistant is needed to investigate field and molecular mycorrhizal ecology of a federally listed Midwestern orchid species. The position will begin in January 2013. Requirements: 1. B.S. degree in an ecology-based discipline in Plant or Biological Sciences, or a closely related field. 2. Field work experience in studying plants (auto- or synecology). Experience with rare plant species, especially orchids, is highly desirable. 3. Laboratory experience with molecular biology techniques. Familiarity with analyses of data is highly desirable. 4. Keen attention to detail, ability to follow directions, ability to efficiently conduct field sampling away from Lubbock (if needed) and molecular biology work in the laboratory, strong organizational and coordination skills, and ability to communicate (verbal and written) effectively in English. 5. A strong work ethic, ability to work independently and as a productive member of a research team, ability to work non-regular hours, as needed. 6. Ability to complete all admission requirements. Competitive salary. Assistantships include partial tuition payment, payroll fringe, and health benefits. Application: Please submit to jyotsna.sharma@ttu.edu: A statement of interest describing past experience and future goals. The applicant should specifically address how their experience, skills, and goals match the position description and requirements listed above; Curriculum vitae, including names, complete address, phone, and e-mail for at least three references; GRE scores; and TOEFL scores (if applicable). Posted: 9/24/12.

Texas Tech University: I am seeking motivated graduate student(s) for a M.S. or Ph.D. in Natural Resources Management. Project topics may include fire effects on insects, plant flammability and combustibility, animal responses and adaptations to fire, and evaluations of fire management programs. Qualifications include a competitive academic record and a strong interest in fire ecology. Previous fire management or research experience is preferred, but not required. Tuition, stipends, and research funding are available. Interested persons should contact Dr. Robin Verble-Pearson by e-mail (robin.verble@ttu.edu) and include a CV. Discussion of potential projects is encouraged. Posted: 8/28/12.

Towson University: A position is available for a Master’s student to work with Dr. Vanessa Beauchamp on the community ecology of a recently introduced invasive grass, Oplismenus hirtellus subsp. undulatifolius (wavyleaf basketgrass). Potential research topics include interactions with mycorrhizal fungi, competition with native plant species, pathways and rates of dispersal and spread, effects on forest food webs and impacts to forest regeneration. The successful applicant will be funded in the Department of Biological Sciences under a 9-month teaching assistantship, with good potential for additional summer funding. Candidates must have a bachelor’s degree in biology or related field. Research experience is a plus. The position will start in late August 2013. Interested students should send a CV, GRE scores, and unofficial transcripts along with a cover letter describing research interests to Dr. Vanessa Beauchamp (vbeauchamp@towson.edu), and must apply to the master’s program in Biology. The deadline to apply is March 15. Posted: 1/29/13.

Tulane University: Funding is available for a Ph.D. student to study the diversification of the pantropical radiation of suboscine birds (Aves: Tyranni) in the Derryberry lab in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. This position is part of an NSF funded, multi-institutional collaboration (LSU, AMNH, Smithsonian, KU, and MPEG), so the successful student will be joining a highly collaborative and productive research team. Project aims include (1) generating a species-level phylogeny of the 1000+ suboscine species using genomic approaches and (2) subsequent analyses intended to improve understanding of diversification in large radiations. The Derryberry lab also has a strong interest in the tempo and mode of behavioral evolution. Students interested in exploring these types of questions in a phylogenetic context are strongly encouraged to apply. The successful candidate will have a proven capacity for writing and communication, excellent interpersonal skills, and strong quantitative skills (e.g. computer programming, bioinformatics). Salary and benefits are competitive. Interested applicants should send a cover letter, CV, GPA and GRE scores, and a statement of professional goals to Dr. Elizabeth Derryberry (ederrybe@tulane.edu) as well as apply to the degree program. Applications are due January 15, 2013. Posted: 12/3/12.

Umeå University/Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: PhD positions in soil chemistry/biogeochemistry. We are looking for two highly motivated Ph.D. students (4-year positions) for a collaboration project between Umeå University (UMU) and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). The main objective of the research is to identify the environmental controls of carbon transformation at low temperatures and in frozen soils in both seasonally frozen soils systems and permafrost. Position 1 will be based at SLU, and the PhD-student will work on “Microbial activity and carbon mineralization in frozen soils”. This work will include studies of metabolic rates and substrate utilization of the soil microbial population and field work on soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange. Applicants should hold at least a BSc in Soil Science, Ecology, Biology, or comparable. Documented experience from scientific work on (soil) microbiology, biogeochemistry and NMR spectroscopy is a merit. More information and details on how to apply (Dnr. SLU ua 803/2013) For additional information contact Mats.Oquist@slu.se. Position 2 will be based at UMU, and the PhD student will work on “NMR spectroscopy for soil carbon turnover”. This work will involve the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to characterize soil properties and of turnover of individual soil constituents. For more information, contact jurgen.schleucher@chem.umu.se Applications for this position should be sent to jobb@umu.se, marked “dnr 313-116-13”. Applicants should hold or receive in the near future a Master degree in chemistry, biochemistry, or equivalent. Documented experience in organic synthesis or NMR is of advantage. Deadline for applications is March 10, 2013 and search will continue until positions are filled. The application should be in English and should include a cover letter describing your motivation for this position, CV including a list of university courses with grades, a copy of your graduate work, and names and addresses of two persons willing to act as references. Posted: 2/27/13.

Umeå University: A PhD student position in plant ecology is now open in my research group, to work on effects of reindeer grazing in arctic ecosystem. Project: Effects of reindeer on summer pasture productivity: using historical reindeer pens, border fences and reindeer herding districts as long-term and large scale ecological experiments. Reindeer can both increase and decrease the productivity of their grazing grounds. When and how this occur, and its importance for reindeer herding is still poorly known. The PhD student will use two natural experiments to investigate how reindeer influence the productivity of their summer ranges. 1. The PhD student will use data from the National Inventory of the Landscapes in Sweden (NILS) and remote sensing to address how productivity varies with reindeer densities at a landscape level. 2. The PhD student will also use historical reindeer pens in this project. These historical pens are still visible in the landscape as productive spots more than a century after the active use of them has ceased. The PhD student will study the ecological processes that maintain these productive spots for such a long time to gain knowledge about the long-term effect of grazing in these ecosystems. The focus of the project can shift within this framework depending on the competence and interest of the student. More information. Deadline: 12/17/12. Posted: 12/11/12.

Universität Bern: We are offering a PhD position to work on local adaptation to climate in trees, as part of the EU project FunDiv http://www.fundiveurope.eu/. This project looks at the functional importance of biodiversity in European forests. As part of this project a network of sites has been set up in six countries: Finland, Poland, Germany, Romania, Spain and Italy. The subproject led by the University of Bern looks at local adaptation to climate in a different dominant tree species in each of these countries. The aim is to assess the degree of local adaptation in these trees, to the magnitude of climate change that they will experience over the next 50 years. The project will also investigate interactions between forest biodiversity and the expression of local adaptation. To accomplish this, seedlings from 5 different climatic provenances per country have already been planted in the forest plots at each site. The announced PhD project will be responsible for measuring the performance of the tree seedlings in the field at each of the sites and offers the opportunity for some additional experiments. As well as possible collaborations within the Institute of Plant Sciences in Bern there will be opportunities for collaborations with other groups in the FunDiv project. We are looking for an ambitious and creative student with a keen interest in ecology and evolution. The applicant must have a university degree in a relevant field of biology and a good command of English. The applicant should be prepared to work in the field and to travel quite extensively to all of the European study sites. The position is for 3 years and the student will be supervised by Markus Fischer at the Plant Sciences Institute at the University of Bern. The institute offers a stimulating international research environment and excellent facilities. In addition to projects on plant biodiversity, our group is involved in projects on evolutionary and molecular plant ecology, functional forest biodiversity in China, plant population biology, Alpine ecology and invasion biology. www.botany.unibe.ch/planteco. Bern is a beautiful city with a high quality of life. Preferred starting date is January 1, 2013 (negotiable). Salary will be approximately 40k CHF/year. Contact Eric Allan (eric.allan@ips.unibe.ch) for more info. Please send your application (preferably one PDF by email) to eric.allan@ips.unibe.ch Include a CV, names and addresses of at least 2 references, a short description of your research interests and your experience of ecological field work and statistical analysis. Applications will be reviewed from 15th October 2012 until the position is filled. Posted: 9/10/12.

Université du Québec à Rimouski: We are seeking a postdoctoral fellow and a PHD student to work on a team project on modeling forest growth and dynamics at the temperate-boreal forest transition. The successful candidates will work in collaboration with a large team of forest ecologists and modelers. PHD POSITION. The challenge of sustainable forest management is to satisfy simultaneously economical, social and environmental concerns. This project aims to maximize these three objectives by developing silvicultural practices that will promote diversity of forest stands. There is now a consensus, for several systems, that biodiversity has a positive effect on the provision of ecosystem services. Despite the documented advantages of a new silvicultural strategy that is explicitly based on the promotion of biodiversity, several barriers are preventing the application of this concept in current forestry practices. The general objective of this project is thus to evaluate operationally the effect of tree diversity on forest productivity and on the sustainable annual allowable cut. The project consists of developing regional growth and yield models that will account for competition and facilitation. The models will be developed from temporary and permanent sampling plots and an experimental design of high diversity plantations. The growth models will be used to evaluate the impact of different silvicultural practices promoting tree diversity on the sustainable annual allowable cut of representative management areas of temperate, mixed and boreal forests. An MSc degree in forestry, biology, environmental sciences or statistics is ideal, but other fields may be considered. Applicants should have a demonstrated interest in ecological modelling, working with large databases, a good statistical basis and some programming skills or at least a strong interest in learning it. A fellowship of $ 20k per year for 3 years is offered. Applications, including a letter describing research interests, a CV, copies of transcripts and the contact information for two references, or any questions about the project should be directed to dominique_gravel@uqar.ca. Knowledge of French is not required but the student must be open to learn and work in this environment. Research activities will be conducted at the biology department at the Université du Québec à Rimouski. The candidates will be invited to join the activities of a dynamic laboratories and an active team of collaborators from the Quebec Center for Biodiversity Science and the Center for Forest Science. The student will also benefit from the resources and training offered by a training program in forest complexity modeling. Posted: 10/29/12.

Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie: We propose a 3 years long PhD project in eco-physiology funded by the Conseil régional Ile-de-France in France with a starting date in September 2013. The thesis will focus on the stress responses of individuals to habitat degradation through the secretion of glucocorticoids. It will use the viviparous lizard Zootoca (Lacerta) vivipara as a model species, and a combination of experimental and modeling approaches. The candidate selected will carry out his/her thesis in the team « Evolutionary Ecophysiology » of the Ecology-Evolution laboratory at the University Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris. Experiments will take place at the Research Center for Experimental and Predictive Ecology nearby Paris (CEREEP) in collaboration with the research group of Dr. Jean-François Le Galliard. We welcome candidates with a master degree, experience or training in animal eco-physiology and excellent academic records. Candidates should contact Professor Sandrine Meylan +33(0)1.44.27.27.33, smeylan@snv.jussieu.fr) before June 30 and submit an application file including a letter of intent, a resume, a copy of the master diploma and if possible letters of support. More information. Posted: 6/10/13.

University College London: Applications are invited for four PhD studentships in the UCL ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) that cross the disciplinary boundaries with the natural sciences. The projects are linked to the following UCL Institutes "Global Health", "Sustainable Resources", "Global Governance" and "Risk & Disaster Reduction". UCL is one of the world's leading research universities, dedicated to developing, disseminating and applying original knowledge to transform society and benefit the world of the future. The studentships are designed to promote collaboration across disciplines and offer training in social sciences in combination with natural and environmental sciences. The studentships cover funding for four years to accommodate some additional multidisciplinary training requirements. The start date of the studentships is 23 September 2013. Project descriptions: The studentships will be in the following four areas: Natural Disasters and Development: 1. Understanding the relationship between extreme poverty and natural disaster vulnerability, 2. Assessing climate change impacts on global health; Legal and Policy frameworks for Natural Resource Management: 3. Incorporation of environmental science into international policies to reduce deforestation, 4. Understanding the role of natural resources within the global green economy. Alongside a primary research supervisor from the social sciences a set of secondary supervisors will be drawn from the natural and environmental sciences. Applicants should have a Master's degree in a relevant area and a first or good upper second-class undergraduate degree. Applicants must be eligible for ESRC funding. Applications will be evaluated on the academic strength of the candidates and the match between the candidate's experience and the available projects and supervisors. Degree qualifications gained from outside the UK, or a combination of qualifications and/or experience that is equivalent to a relevant UK degree, may be accepted. EU applicants may only be eligible for fees-only funding. Financial remuneration will be in line with current ESRC guidelines. Full awards consist of a tax-free enhanced maintenance stipend of £15,726, a London Weighting allowance of £2,000, and payment of the fees for MPhil/PhD enrolment at UCL. Fees-only awards only cover the fees for MPhil/PhD enrolment. To apply, please email a completed application form, found at PhD Applications and Funding (found in section 'How to Apply- and click on application form') , your CV and a one-page cover letter in one file to Fiona Mannion, f.mannion@ucl.ac.uk. Your cover letter should include information sufficient to allow confirmation of your eligibility for an ESRC award. Queries about the studentships should be directed to Professor Mark Maslin, m.maslin@ucl.ac.uk. Closing Date: 7 June 2013. Interviews will be held in the week commencing 24 June. Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Alabama: A M.S Graduate Assistantship in the Department of Biological Sciences is available immediately at the University of Alabama for a highly motivated student to work on models of urban tree attributes, such as crown dimensions and biomass. The goals of this project are to better characterize and understand urban tree attributes and their value to society. The student will have the opportunity to interact with scientists from the University of Alabama, University of Florida, and USDA Forest Service. A general knowledge of forestry and/or urban ecosystems is required, as well as a solid background in statistical analysis, such as generalized linear mixed modeling. This is a fully funded teaching assistantship that includes: stipend, health insurance, tuition waiver, and summer salary. Interested students should send a copy of their CV, statement of research interest, and unofficial copy of transcripts to Dr. Christina Staudhammer, or contact Dr. Staudhammer for more details (cstaudhammer@ua.edu or 205-348-1538). Posted: 6/4/13.

University of Alabama: The Howeth Lab in the Department of Biological Sciences invites applications for a Ph.D. Graduate Assistantship in aquatic community ecology beginning Fall 2013. A highly motivated student is sought to collaborate on a project which aims to understand how metacommunity dynamics may affect the establishment, spread, and impact of non-native species, using freshwater zooplankton communities as a model system. The research will include observational studies of zooplankton communities in reservoirs across the United States, mesocosm experiments at the University of Alabama Tanglewood Biological Station, and population genetic/genomic analyses. Requirements: M.S. in Ecology and Evolution or related field with preference for candidates who have a background in freshwater ecosystems, experimental ecology, and/or evolutionary ecology. Interested students should send an e-mail to Dr. Jennifer Howeth (jghoweth@as.ua.edu) with "Ph.D. Graduate Assistantship" in the title, and include their CV, statement of research interests, writing sample, GRE scores (if known), unofficial copies of transcripts, and contact information for two references by January 15th, 2013. Qualified applicants will be invited to apply to the Graduate School and the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alabama. The Department of Biological Sciences offers Graduate Teaching Assistantships and competitive fellowships to support admitted students. See also: Center for Freshwater Studies. Posted: 11/19/12.

University of Alabama: The Howeth Lab in the Department of Biological Sciences invites applications for a M.S. Graduate Assistantship in community ecology beginning Spring or Fall 2013. A highly motivated student is sought to study metacommunity dynamics of zooplankton among forest ponds in different stages of succession. The research will include observational studies of pond communities in the Talladega National Forest and pond mesocosm experiments at the University of Alabama Tanglewood Biological Station. Interested students should send an e-mail to Dr. Jennifer Howeth (jghoweth@as.ua.edu) with "MS Graduate Assistantship" in the title, and include their CV, statement of research interests, writing sample, GRE scores (if known), unofficial copies of undergraduate transcripts, and contact information for two references by December 1, 2012. Qualified applicants will be invited to apply to the Graduate School and the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alabama. The Department of Biological Sciences offers Graduate Teaching Assistantships and competitive fellowships to support admitted students. See also: Center for Freshwater Studies. Posted: 10/23/12.

University of Alabama: an exciting opportunity available for a student to conduct their Ph.D. Research in The Plant Physiological Ecology / Global Change Lab. We seek a highly motivated graduate student to work on a newly funded project looking at the complex interactions between CO2 sequestration and CH4 emissions in Everglades National Park. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work with scientists from the University of Alabama, Florida International University, the FCE LTER, and the USGS Park Service. Students should apply for the Ph.D. program within the Department of Biological Sciences. The student's research interests should focus on plant ecophysiology, ecosystem physiology, or plant ecology. To be eligible for positions, interested students must meet the graduate admission requirements of the University of Alabama and have competitive GPA and GRE scores. Support is a research assistantship for the first two years of the project followed by support through the University of Alabama as a teaching assistant in years 3 and 4. Highly qualified candidates may also be eligible for fully-funded University Fellowships. Interested students should send a copy of their CV, statement of research interest, and unofficial copy of transcripts to Dr. Gregory Starr or contact Dr. Starr for more details (gstarr@ua.edu or 205-348-0556). Posted: 3/26/13.

University of Alabama: A M.S. Graduate Assistantship in the Department of Biological Sciences is available immediately for a highly motivated student to work on a large interdisciplinary project at the Joseph Jones Ecological Research Center. This project focuses on developing an understanding of fire's impact on ecosystem carbon dynamics along a natural moisture gradient in longleaf pine systems. The student will have the opportunity to interact with scientists from the University of Alabama, Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, USDA Forest Service, University of Edinburgh, and NEON Inc. A general knowledge of photosynthetic equipment and soil respiration is advantageous; a strong background in statistical analyses methods, such as time series analysis, wavelet analysis, and/or data assimilation is necessary. This is a fully funded teaching assistantship that includes: stipend, health insurance, and tuition waiver. Interested students should send a copy of their CV, statement of research interest, writing sample, and unofficial copy of transcripts to Drs. Gregory Starr (gstarr@ua.edu) and Christina Staudhammer (cstaudhammer@ua.edu), or contact Dr. Starr for more details (gstarr@ua.edu or 205-348-0556). Posted: 10/10/12.

University of Alabama: A M.S Graduate Assistantship in the Department of Biological Sciences is available immediately for a highly motivated student to work on a synthesis of urban forestry projects. These projects seek to understand the growth dynamics of subtropical and tropical urban forests. The student will have the opportunity to interact with scientists from the University of Alabama and University of Florida. A general knowledge of forestry and/or urban ecosystems is required, as well as a solid background in statistical analysis, such as generalized linear mixed modeling and multivariate methods. This is a fully funded teaching assistantship that includes: stipend, health insurance, and tuition waiver. Interested students should send a copy of their CV, statement of research interest, writing sample, and unofficial copy of transcripts to Dr. Christina Staudhammer, or contact Dr. Staudhammer for more details (cstaudhammer@ua.edu or 205-348-1538). Posted: 10/10/12.

University of Alabama: A M.S Graduate Assistantship in the Department of Biological Sciences is available immediately for a highly motivated student to work on a synthesis of winter arctic plant physiology studies. These studies cover a range of hypotheses regarding winter carbon and water exchange in vascular plant species. The student will have the opportunity to interact with scientists from the University of Alabama, Florida International University, and NEON Inc. A general knowledge of plant physiology and/or plant physiological ecology is required, as well as a solid background in statistical analysis of experimental data. This is a fully funded teaching assistantship that includes: stipend, health insurance, and tuition waiver. Interested students should send a copy of their CV, statement of research interest, writing sample, and unofficial copy of transcripts to Drs. Gregory Starr (gstarr@ua.edu) and Christina Staudhammer (cstaudhammer@ua.edu), or contact Dr. Starr for more details (gstarr@ua.edu or 205-348-0556). Posted: 10/10/12.

University of Alaska Anchorage: M.S. Assistantship in Arctic Tundra Ecology. A research assistantship is available on a project funded by the National Science Foundation to study the differential phenology of grasses and shrubs and their implications for ecosystem function (cycling of water, carbon and nitrogen). The project is a collaboration between the University of Alaska and Penn State University. The study site is near Kangerlussuaq in western Greenland, which is accessed via flights with the Air National Guard. The successful candidate will use stable isotope methods to trace the flow of carbon from the atmosphere, into plants and soils and back to the atmosphere. The student is expected to spend the majority of the snow-free season working at the field site with other members of the project. The fieldwork is based out of a tent camp, but visits are made to town approximately once per week. The project will cover the student’s tuition, health insurance and will provide a competitive stipend. The position will begin in April 2013, with enrollment to follow in the Fall Semester. Applicants should be physically fit, hold a valid driver’s license, have extensive camping experience and be willing to endure periods of poor weather. The student will be based in Anchorage during the off-season (mid-September- late May). Laboratory and desk/office space is available in the Ecosystems Laboratory on the UAA campus and affordable housing can be found within a bike ride of campus. Anchorage is a surprisingly diverse city with outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities, including more than 130 km of groomed Nordic ski trails within the city limits. Inquiries are welcome. To apply for the position, please send a resume and two-page cover letter to Dr. Paddy Sullivan (pfsullivan@uaa.alaska.edu). Apply by 11/10/12. Applicants should ensure that they can meet the admission requirements for the M.S. program in the Department of Biological Sciences prior to the March 15, 2013 deadline. Posted: 10/4/12, revised: 10/22/12.

[position filled] University of Alaska Anchorage: M.S. Assistantship in the Physiological Ecology of trees at the Arctic treeline. A research assistantship is available on a project funded by the National Science Foundation to study the water relations, growth and reproduction of white spruce along a gradient from west to east in the Brooks Range. Study sites have been established on the Agashashok and Kugururok Rivers in Noatak National Preserve, the Dietrich River in the central Brooks Range and on the Wind River in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Access to three of the four sites is via bushplane, while the Dietrich site can be reached by road. The successful candidate will spend the majority of the snow-free season working at and traveling among the research sites. The fieldwork is based out of tent camps and the crew size will vary between two and three people. The project will cover the student’s tuition, health insurance and will provide a competitive stipend. The position will begin in April 2013, with enrollment to follow in the Fall Semester. Applicants should be physically fit, hold a valid driver’s license, have extensive camping experience and be willing to endure periods of poor weather. The student will be based in Anchorage during the off-season (mid-September- late May). Laboratory and desk/office space is available in the Ecosystems Laboratory on the UAA campus and affordable housing can be found within a bike ride of campus. Anchorage is a surprisingly diverse city with outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities, including more than 130 km of groomed Nordic ski trails within the city limits. Inquiries are welcome. To apply for the position, please send a resume and two-page cover letter to Dr. Paddy Sullivan (pfsullivan@uaa.alaska.edu). Applicants should ensure that they can meet the admission requirements for the M.S. program in the Department of Biological Sciences prior to the March 15, 2013 deadline. Posted: 10/4/12.

University of Alaska Fairbanks: Seeking to fill a PhD research assistantship that aims to understand landcover effects on juvenile salmon freshwater habitat and/or food web dynamics in the face of climate and landscape change. The project is a highly collaborative, team-based, research effort with university, agency, and NGO partners. Strong academic training and field experience in aquatic biology/ecology and/or fish ecology, GIS experience, basic understanding and interest in modeling, excellent communication and interpersonal skills, field experience and competence, and ability to work in team and individual settings are essential. Excellent writing and oral communication skills are also a must. Successful candidate will be required to successfully complete training in boat operation, gun/bear safety, and wilderness first aid and CPR. Project is based out of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and fieldwork will involve traveling to moderately remote field sites in southcentral Alaska during the field seasons (May-Sept). Position is funded for 4 years starting at $23/hr. Student has the option of obtaining their degree in either Fisheries or Biology. Send /via email/ a cover letter, resume, transcripts, GRE scores, and contact information of three references to: Dr. Mark Wipfli (mwipfli@alaska.edu), USGS Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks. more about graduate studies at UAF. Position will remain open until filled, but the intent is to start fieldwork in June. Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Alaska Fairbanks: Seeking to fill four graduate positions (M.S. & Ph.D.) and several technician positions on three research projects in Alaska looking at riverine food webs, predator/prey interactions, and landuse/climate change influences on stream-terrestrial trophic linkages (EPSCoR). One project on the Kenai River watershed focuses on hydrologic connectivity in headwaters, and the effects of landcover and climate change on prey supplies for stream salmonids. Another looks at temporal and spatial patterns of benthic macroinvertebrate communities, prey abundance and availability, and predation by fishes, above and below a natural anadromous fish barrier on the Susitna River.The third investigates predator-prey interactions and factors influencing predation risk for juvenile Chinook salmon within the Yukon River watershed. All students will be supported on research assistantships, but will be expected to assist with teaching 1-2 semesters of their graduate program.Technician positions range from 6-24 months, with the possibility of extension. Technicians will be involved in several aspects of the projects, primarily in support of graduate student research, including field and lab work, project logistics and management, data entry, and project planning and coordination. All three projects are highly collaborative, team-based, research efforts variably involving university, agency, subsistence fishers, and private industry partners. Strong academic training in aquatic biology/ecology, entomology, or fish ecology, excellent communication and interpersonal skills, field experience and competence, and ability to work in team and individual settings are essential.Excellent writing skills are a must. Successful candidates will be required to successfully complete training in boat operation, gun/bear safety, wilderness survival, first aid, and CPR. Work will be based at UAF, and fieldwork will involve camping in, and working out of, remote field sites during parts of the field season. Weather during the research season is normally moderately warm (50-80°F) and reasonably dry, but field conditions at times can be cold, wet, and bear and bug-ridden.Successful candidates should also be willing and able to tolerate the inconveniences of an unspoiled natural environment and seemingly endless outdoor activities. Salaries range $22-26/hr for graduate students, $14-21 for techs. Students will have the option of applying to and obtaining their degrees in either Fisheries or Biology. To begin the application process, submit via email a cover letter that includes a brief review of your research experience, interests and goals, and what makes you a good fit for one of these positions (2 page max), resume, transcripts, GRE scores (except biotechnician applicants), and names of three references to: Dr. Mark S. Wipfli (mwipfli@alaska.edu). To learn more about graduate studies at UAF. Successful applicants will begin work between March-July, 2013, depending on project needs and funding. Posted: 1/2/13.

University of Alaska Fairbanks: Two graduate student assistantships are available in the laboratory of Dr. Tamara Harms. Contact Dr. Harms (tamara.harms@alaska.edu) regarding interest in the following projects. Please include a brief description of research interests and experience and academic preparation. The application deadline for the graduate program in the Department of Biology & Wildlife is Jan 15. Applicants for either position should have strong academic backgrounds in natural science, prior research experience, and demonstrated interests in ecosystem ecology or biogeochemistry. 1) Climate-mediated coupling of hydrology and biogeochemistry in arctic hillslopes We are seeking an M.S. student to develop a thesis related to biogeochemistry of arctic hillslopes. The student will join a team that is investigating how climate-induced changes in water and nutrient cycles on land are propagated to stream networks in permafrost-influenced catchments. This is an inter-disciplinary project that includes hydrologists and biogeochemists, and the candidate will have the opportunity to engage with students and faculty across these disciplines. Candidates should have interests or experience in terrestrial or aquatic biogeochemistry, stream ecology, or wetland ecosystems. Field work for the project is based at the Toolik Field Station, and the student should be willing to spend the majority of the summer at the station. 2) Nutrient dynamics in the region of discontinuous permafrost I am seeking an M.S. student to develop a thesis project investigating the mechanisms underlying elevated hydrologic or gaseous nitrogen export from ecosystems subject to permafrost loss or disturbance. Candidates should have interests or experience in nutrient cycling, catchment biogeochemistry, stream ecology, or soil science. Research will focus on interior Alaska, and the student will join a broader collaborative research community anchored by the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research program. Posted: 10/17/12.

University of Alberta: The Department of Renewable Resources is looking to fill a graduate (Msc or PhD) position in soil science biogeochemistry starting September 1, 2013. This research focuses on evaluating carbon pools and dynamics in reconstructed soils (Technosols) in comparison to their natural analogs. Fieldwork will involve soil description and sampling of natural boreal forests and reclaimed sites. Laboratory work will quantify the distribution and activity of soil carbon, and associated faunal and microbial communities. We are looking for a motivated and team-oriented candidate. Applicants should have a strong record of academic excellence, with demonstrated interest in soil science and biogeochemistry. Prior experience using stable isotopes would be beneficial. Proficiency in spoken and written English is a necessity. The successful applicant will be supervised by Sylvie Quideau (Professor; Soil Biogeochemistry, and Mathew Swallow (Postdoctoral Fellow). Stipend will range between CAN$ 19,500 – 23,500 per year for a period of 2 years; extensions are possible, but will depend on student performance. Applications received by July 1, 2013 will be given preference, but the position will remain open until a successful candidate has been identified. To apply, please send your CV, a copy of your transcripts, the name of three references, your TOEFL score (if applicable), and a brief cover letter outlining your research interests to: Sylvie Quideau (Sylvie.quideau@ualberta.ca) and Mathew Swallow (swallow@ualberta.ca). Posted: 6/10/13.

University of Alberta: We are looking for an outstanding student to fill a MSc position investigating the role of early successional tree species for reclamation of surface mined areas in the boreal mixedwood forest region of Alberta, Canada. The overall aim of the research is to understand underlying forest ecosystem processes, to develop reclamation techniques, and to determine stand trajectories to successfully regenerate mined lands to self-sustaining forests by restoring ecosystem functions and processes that are essential for the development of resilient forests. The focus of this MSc project will be to understand how reclamation materials and different tree species influence the development of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities. This project is based in the field; however laboratory work will be required to identify ectomycorrhizal fungi. The successful candidate will be under the supervision of Simon Landhäusser, Industrial Research Chair in Forest Land Reclamation, Alberta School of Forest Science and Management, and Justine Karst, Research Associate in the Department of Renewable Resources. Depending on the interest and quality of the applicants, the project offers considerable flexibility in designing a research program that investigates areas of personal interest within the overall framework of the project. Information on graduate studies in the Department of Renewable Resources. Background in plant biology, forest ecology, mycorrhizal ecology or related field is essential, as is an interest in the linkages between forests and disturbance. Experience with any of the following will be an asset, but is not required: soil science, ecophysiology, molecular tools, fungal biology and silviculture. Proficiency in spoken and written English is a necessity. Selection of a student will be based on academic achievements, reference letters and if applicable previous research experience. Strong verbal, written, and analytical skills are essential. Application deadline: July 1, 2013 or until the position is filled. Appointment would commence in September 2013. The student stipend will range between CAN$ 19,500 – 23,500 per year for a period of 2 years; extensions are possible, but will depend on student performance. The applicants must meet the entrance requirement. Interested candidates should e-mail their transcripts, curriculum vitae, a letter describing their research experience and interests (2 page limit), recent TOEFL scores (if appropriate), and the names and contact information of three references to Justine Karst, justine@karst.ca. Posted: 5/31/13.

[position filled] University of Alberta: Two PhD positions are available in the Department of Renewable Resources to study climate-related tree dieback in western Canada. In North America, Europe and elsewhere, many forests may be at increasing risk of climate-related dieback. Climate change-related forest dieback is an emerging topic with global significance. Two PhD students will study potential causes of climate-induced tree mortality, using forests in western Canada as a model system. The project aims at studying how drought episodes promote dieback via changes in xylem (the water-conducting pipes of a tree) structure and function. Most of the research will be done in the laboratory, but the project will also involve some limited field work. There will be collaboration with a research group in Germany, which studies this topic in European forests. Students will spend several months with the collaborating team in Munich as part of the program. Students will work under the supervision of Drs. Uwe Hacke and Vic Lieffers (position #1) and Dr. Hacke (position #2). Candidates interested in plant physiology, ecology, forestry and/or climate change are encouraged to apply. Selection of students will be based on academic achievements, reference letters and if applicable previous research experience. Strong verbal, written, and analytical skills are essential. Excellent English skills are important. The applicant must meet the entrance requirements. Interested candidates should e-mail their transcripts (scanned would be fine for the unofficial application), CV, a letter describing their research experience and interests (2-page limit), recent TOEFL scores (if appropriate), and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Uwe Hacke (uwe.hacke (at) ualberta.ca) and/or Dr. Vic Lieffers (vic.lieffers (at) ualberta.ca). Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Alberta: A MSc position is available in the Department of Renewable Resources to study Biomass allocation and rooting patterns of trees growing in reclamation soils. The student will be co-supervised by Drs. Uwe Hacke and Simon Landhausser. This project examines biomass allocation, rooting patterns, and water status of trees growing in different soils used in oil sands land reclamation. Experiments will be set up in the Devonian Botanical Garden, not far from the University of Alberta. Trees will be planted in experimental plots characterized by different soil types. The study will provide insight into improving tree establishment in oil sands reclamation. Students with an educational background in plant ecology, physiology, forestry, land reclamation or other related areas are encouraged to apply. Strong verbal, written, and analytical skills are essential. Having a valid driver’s license would be an asset. Selection of students will be based on academic achievements, reference letters and, if applicable previous research experience. Application process. Students must meet the entrance requirements. To apply or to inquire about the position, email Dr. Uwe Hacke (hackeuwe@gmail.com) and/or Dr. Simon Landhausser (slandhae@ualberta.ca). Send a copy of your transcripts, a CV, contact information of two academic referees, and a 2 page statement of interest. Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Alberta: A MSc position is available in the Department of Renewable Resources to study Adaptive traits related to growth performance in hybrid poplar clones. Poplars are common in many North American forest types. Populus species and their hybrids have been planted for wood and fiber production, as well as for emerging applications such as biomass and biofuel production, and phytoremediation. Much fundamental and applied research has focused on poplar biology. Populus is also the forest tree of choice for genomics. In this particular project, we are studying differences in growth of various inter-specific poplar hybrids. Trees will be planted outside in 2013, and growth patterns will be linked with differences in allocation of biomass to roots versus leaves, wood anatomy, and other potentially adaptive traits. Funding: NSERC funding; a Standard Graduate Stipend can be offered. Students with an educational background in plant ecology, physiology, forestry, climate change or other related areas are encouraged to apply. Strong verbal, written, and analytical skills are essential. Having a valid driver’s license would be an asset. Selection of students will be based on academic achievements, reference letters, and, if applicable previous research experience. To apply or to inquire about the position, email Dr. Uwe Hacke (hackeuwe@gmail.com). Send a copy of your transcripts, a CV, contact information of two academic referees, and a statement of interest. Posted: 5/8/13.

University of Alberta: Enthusiastic, team oriented, and self-motivated students are encouraged to apply for a MSc position to work on identifying movement potential and impacts to endangered fishes (e.g. Rocky Mountain Sculpin and Western Silvery Minnow) in southern Alberta. These projects are a multi-disciplinary collaboration between the University of Alberta, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development (AESRD) and industry partners. Students will be under the supervision of Dr. Mark Poesch and will have the opportunity to conduct field work across Alberta’s picturesque southern badlands, develop novel research on freshwater fishes, and interact with team members and industry partners. Email a letter of research interest, CV, recent transcript (unofficial accepted) and references to Dr. Mark Poesch (poesch(at)ualberta.ca) or apply online under the opportunities page at www.markpoesch.com (under opportunities, click join us) (preferred method). Please include a cover letter or statement of research interests, CV, recent transcript (unofficial accepted), and a writing sample. Candidates must have an undergraduate degree (B.Sc) in Biology, Ecology, Zoology, Evolutionary Biology, or a related field, with high overall GPA (especially in related courses). Field related experience and fish identification skills are considered an asset. Posted: 3/19/13.

University of Alberta: We are seeking a student to fill an MSc position in an ongoing investigation of carbon cycling in agroforestry systems. The successful candidate will participate in a project that aims to understand the controls on carbon storage and sequestration, and greenhouse gas emissions in agroforestry systems across different climatic regions in Alberta. Extensive field work will be involved. The project is in collaboration with Scott Chang, Edward Bork, and Cameron Carlyle in the departments of Renewable Resources, and Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science at the University of Alberta, Edmonton. Funding is provided by the Agriculture Greenhouse Gases Program of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. More project details. Persons with an education or training in biogeochemistry, ecology, forestry, soil science, global change biology or other related areas are encouraged to apply. The ability to communicate effectively in English with diverse groups of people is essential. You must be highly motivated, able to work independently but at the same time be a good team player. A valid driver’s license and clean driving record is mandatory. Funding is available for two years. In addition to working within the project, independent lines of research in associated areas can be accommodated. It is preferable that the successful candidate start their program in May of 2013 or start their laboratory and fieldwork in May 2013 while applying to the graduate program at the University of Alberta for the fall of 2013. To be considered, please email a copy of your curriculum vitae, transcripts (scanned transcripts are fine at this time), recent TOEFL scores if appropriate, names and contact details of two references, and a research statement by email to: Cameron N. Carlyle (cameron.carlyle@ualberta.ca), Assistant Professor, Rangeland Ecology, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science. Posted: 2/5/13.

University of Alberta: I am looking for an independent, enthusiastic, self-motivated PhD student with interest in fire science and fire ecology. The proposed study aims to understand the spatially heterogeneous fuel structure in managed forests and evaluate the effects of fuel heterogeneity on fire behavior. The selected student will be involved in the EMEND study. Our research focuses on understanding the fire behavior in heterogeneous landscape and quantifying the effects of fire on carbon cycling using field experiments and modeling approaches. I am a member of Western Partnership for Wildland Fire Science, so students will be exposed to various topics in fire science and many active scientists in the field. A qualified student will require a valid driver’s license and good ability in forest ecology. Experiences in fire science and modeling will be an advantage. If you are interested in the position, please submit a cover letter, CV, copy of transcripts, and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Soung Ryu via email (soung.ryu@ualberta.ca) with the subject line “Application for EMEND PhD position”. Official starting date is Sept 2013, but starting a field season at the summer 2013 will be highly desired. There will be also several MSc positions open in a near future, so if you are interested in graduate studies in fire science, please contact me for further information. Posted: 1/24/13.

University of Alberta: Three MSc/PhD student positions in forest soils-plant nutrition. Project 1: Carbon cycling in agroforestry systems. We aim to understand the controls on carbon storage/sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in agroforestry systems across different climatic regions in Alberta. Project 2: Salt movement in reclaimed oil sands soils. The objectives are to minimize the risk of salt movement from saline subsoils to surface reclamation material and to evaluate the response of plants to salt intrusion into the surface soil. Project 3: Performance of nutrient-loaded seedlings in oil sands reclamation. This project examines the utility of nutrient-loading in improving seedling performance at establishment in oil sands reclamation and the mechanisms involved. Extensive field work will be involved. The projects offer considerable flexibility in designing research programs that investigate areas of personal interest (to the student) within the overall framework of the projects. Students with educational background/training/experience in biogeochemistry, ecology, forestry, soil science, global change biology or other related areas are encouraged to apply. Selection of students will be based on academic achievements, reference letters and if applicable previous research experience. Strong verbal, written, and analytical skills are essential. Having a valid driver’s license and a good driving record would be an asset. Salary ranges between CAN$20–24 per year plus benefits for a period of 2 (MSc) to 4 (PhD) years. It is preferable that successful candidates start their program in May 2013 or start their laboratory and fieldwork in May 2013 while applying to the graduate program at the University of Alberta for the fall of 2013. Interested candidates should e-mail their transcripts (scanned would be fine for the unofficial application), curriculum vitae, a letter describing their research experience and interests (2-page limit), recent TOEFL scores (if appropriate), and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Scott Chang, Professor, Forest Soils and Nutrient Dynamics, 442 Earth Sciences Building, Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E3. Tel: (780) 492-6375; Fax: (780) 492-1767, Email: scott.chang@ualberta.ca. Posted: 1/11/13.

University of Alberta: M.Sc. Position – Conservation Biology. Enthusiastic, team oriented, and self-motivated students are encouraged to apply for a MSc position to work on identifying the impacts of stream related crossings (both temporary and permanent) on fish populations in northern Alberta. This project is a multi-disciplinary collaboration between the University of Alberta, the Foothills Research Institute, Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development (AESRD) and industry partners. Students will be under the supervision of Dr. Mark Poesch and will have the opportunity to conduct field work across Alberta’s picturesque foothills, develop novel research on freshwater fishes, and interact with team members and industry partners. Email a letter of research interest, CV, recent transcript (unofficial accepted) and references to Dr. Mark Poesch (poesch(at)ualberta.ca). Candidates must have an undergraduate degree (B.Sc) in Biology, Ecology, Zoology, Evolutionary Biology, or a related field, with high overall GPA (especially in related courses). Field related experience and fish identification skills are considered an asset. Candidates interested in this position should send an email to Dr. Mark Poesch (Poesch@ualberta.ca) with cover letter identifying research interests, CV, recent transcript (unofficial accepted), and a writing sample. Posted: 1/3/13.

University of Amsterdam: A post-doc and several PhD positions in the Insititute for Environmental Studies. See: http://www.ivm.vu.nl/en/people/vacancies/ Postdoc ‘A global analysis of land change decision making’, PhD position ‘Social valuation of ecosystem service dynamics’, PhD position ‘Multi-scale assessment of ecosystem service dynamics’, PhD position ‘Global land change: linking pattern to process’, PhD position ‘Simulating extreme low flows and consequences from droughts’, PhD position ‘Trends in European flooding disasters and coping mechanisms’. Respond before November 23, 2012. Posted: 11/16/12.

University of Arizona: Graduate Research Assistantship: ecohydrology, ecosystem services, & the resilience of socio-ecological systems - Watershed Management and Ecohydrology. The student would join an interdisciplinary team working on an NSF funded Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems project titled "Strengthening Resilience of Arid Region Riparian Corridors: Ecohydrology and Decision-Making in the Sonora and San Pedro Watersheds". The project links ecohydrology and decision making approaches to evaluate the resilience of arid riparian areas to climate change and land-use practices. We are looking for a PhD or MS candidate with a background and interest in working with ecological and climate data that informs decision-making linked to ecosystem services and the resilience of socio-ecological systems. The candidate will conduct field work in semi-arid watersheds to help develop ecological indicator data sets that link to decision making and to monitor ecosystem responses to climate and land-use variability. There will be opportunities to work with stakeholders in semi-arid watersheds, and to conduct research in a bi-national setting. This position requires a background in environmental science, ecohydrology, plant science, ecosystem ecology, environmental statistics, geography or related field. Expertise in Geographical Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, and explicit skills in data analysis and modeling is preferred. The student would be enrolled in the Natural Resources Program, Watershed Management and Ecohydrology focus with the School of Natural Resources and Environment. See program websites for more information on application and program details. Candidates selected to receive the assistantship will have a full tuition waiver and receive a stipend and benefits according to the program, - the student would start in Summer or Fall 2013. For details on the assistantship or project, contact Dr. Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman (mzucker@email.arizona.edu). Posted: 1/29/13.

University of Arizona: A research assistantship is available to support a Ph.D. (preferred) or M.S. student interested in investigating effects of efforts to restore semi-desert grasslands in southern Arizona on density and nesting success of songbirds. Since 2006, biologists from the Bureau of Land Management and its partners have been applying fire and mechanical methods to reduce the influence of mesquite invasion into semi-desert grasslands on the Las Cienegas National Conservation Area. We have surveyed birds in this area since 2005. Requirements: For Ph.D: M.S. degree in Wildlife, Zoology, Ecology or related field. For M.S: B.S. degree in Wildlife, Zoology, Ecology or related field. Minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.25. Beneficial Experience: Strong field identification skills, some experience (or strong interest) in quantitative approaches to population ecology. Strong work ethic, good verbal and written communication skills, and ability to work independently. Support: stipend, which includes a waiver of out-of-state tuition (but not fees) for at least 2.5 years. Start Date: January 2013. Deadline for materials: 22 October 2012. To Apply: Submit via email (steidl@ag.arizona.edu) a letter of interest, resume, transcripts, and GRE scores (unofficial are fine), and names, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses of three references to: Bob Steidl, School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona, 325 Biological Sciences East, Tucson, AZ 85721. More info: email or 520-626-3164. Posted: 9/14/12.

University of Arkansas: PhD student studentships are available in my new lab to work on Microbial Ecology/ Gut microbiome, health and diet. Advisor: Dr Franck Carbonero, Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science. Non-exhaustive list of projects: Complementary metagenomic and microbiome analyses of samples derived from human nutrition exchange trials in Africa and the US. Cultivation of representative communities from different intestinal samples. In vitro characterization of the effect of selected dietary elements. Simultaneous microbiome and host trancriptomics analyses from biopsies sample from digestive diseases patients (Colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease…) Required qualifications. Applicants should hold an MSc (Bsc will be considered for US or UK candidates) degree in gut microbiology, microbial ecology, bioinformatics or related fields and have a practical background in molecular and cultivation techniques. Experience in one or more of the following areas/techniques will be of advantage: profiling of microbial communities (fingerprinting, clone library analyses, next-generation sequencing analysis), qPCR, annotation of (meta-)genomes, anaerobic microbiology, nutrition. Proficiency in spoken and written English is mandatory. To apply, please send an email (subject: PhD Gut microbiome and diet) to Dr. Franck Carbonero, carbonef@illinois.edu containing a pdf-file with a detailed CV, a motivation letter, and contact details of at least two references. Start date is flexible from Fall 2013. Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Arkansas, Monticello: M.S. Assistantship: Using GIS to Model Stream Networks in the Ouachita National Forest. The School of Forest Resources is seeking applicants for a M.S. Assistantship available beginning in summer or fall of 2013. The two year assistantship is half-time and carries a stipend of $15k plus tuition per year. The goal of the project is to improve methods for delineating surface drainage networks in the Ouachita National Forest. The graduate assistant hired will assess the influence of roads, land cover, topographic derivatives such as slope and aspect, and spatial resolution on the accuracy of headwaters streams models using field data and spatial analysis. Requirements: A 2.7 overall undergraduate GPA or 3.0 GPA in the last 60 semester hours of undergraduate courses, and completion of the GRE are required. A B.S. degree in spatial information systems, forestry, natural resources, hydrology, soils, environmental science, agriculture, geography, biology, or a related field is required. Good computer, data management, and writing skills are required. A valid U.S. drivers license must be presented within 60 days of the start of the assistantship. The ability to conduct strenuous fieldwork in mountainous terrain is required. GIS/Remote Sensing background is desirable. Research Facilities: The School of Forest Resources houses the Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (QAL). The QAL is a state of the art computing laboratory that serves the University and Arkansas by providing resources and training for students and professionals. The School recently completed construction and renovation of the George H. Clippert Forest Resources Annex, H.H. Chamberlin Forest Resources Complex, and IT infrastructure for the School. Graduate program and application information. Applicants must apply to both UAM (online) and The School of Forest Resources (by mail). Applicants must submit GRE scores, official transcripts, a statement of interests, and three letters of recommendation. Please indicate position number SFR0313A on all application materials and inquiries. Examples of work related to this project will be helpful in the selection process. For additional information, please contact Dr. Hal O. Liechty (liechty@uamont.edu) or Dr. David Carr (carrjohn@uamont.edu). Posted: 3/22/13, revised: 5/6/13.

University of Arkansas, Monticello: The School of Forest Resources has a M.S. Assistantship available beginning in the fall of 2013. The assistantship is half time and carries a stipend of $15k+tuition. Project: The successful candidate will work on a USDA, AFRI funded project developing cottonwood/switchgrass agroforest systems for supplying cellulosic bioenergy feedstock in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV). The project is a coordinated effort between scientists in Arkansas and Louisiana. The MS assistantship will focus on belowground biomass (course and fine root) production and dynamics in bioenergy agroforests (cottonwood, switchgrass, and combined cottonwood/switchgrass cropping systems) compared to that in traditional agriculture ecosystems that are grown on marginal soils in the LMAV. In addition the successful candidate will quantify the contributions of belowground biomass to carbon sequestration of these crops. Requirements: A 2.7 overall undergraduate GPA or 3.0 GPA in the last 60 semester hours of undergraduate courses and satisfactory GRE scores (verbal+quantitative old scale ~1000, new scale ~200). A B.S. degree in environmental science, biology, soils, agriculture, forestry or a related field is also required. Contact Information: For additional information or to apply contact Dr. Hal O. Liechty, School of Forest Resources, UAM, P.O. Box 3468, Monticello AR 71656. Phone: 870-460-1052, E-Mail: liechty@uamont.edu. Graduate materials and information. Posted: 2/5/13.

University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff: M.S. assistantship in Aquatic Ecology at the Aquaculture and Fisheries Center. The graduate student will work with faculty and other students to conduct: (1) Field investigation of water quality (e.g., dissolved oxygen and nutrients) and biological components (e.g., algae, macroinvertebrates, and fish); (2) Watershed assessment; and (3) Data analysis with statistical tools. The student will get training in water quality/biological field monitoring, laboratory instrument analysis, and quantitative computer software computing. Research results will be presented in national or international academic conferences and published in peer reviewed journals. Pre-Application: A current resume, copy of GRE scores, unofficial transcripts, and name and email contact information of three references are needed to be sent to Dr. Yushun Chen at ychen@uaex.edu Closing Date: Open until filled, start to review applications on Feb. 1, 2013. Posted: 1/3/13.

University of Auckland: New Zealand’s ancient kauri trees (Agathis australis) will be exposed to hotter and drier summers due to climate change. This exciting three year PhD project involves investigating drought adaptations of kauri and associated species. We are looking for a highly motivated student to be part of a larger study using measurement and modelling approaches to determine climate change impacts on native forests. The student will need to have a keen interest in plants and a willingness to do remote fieldwork. Experience in plant physiology techniques is an advantage but not a requirement. The project is funded by the Marsden Fund and is based at The University of Auckland, New Zealand’s leading university. The scholarship includes a stipend of $NZ25000 p.a. for 3 years with the possibility of extension for a further 6 months (based on academic merit), all tuition fees and health insurance for international students. Please contact Cate Macinnis-Ng (c.macinnis-ng@auckland.ac.nz) for further details. The closing date is 17 June and the application form will be available on the University of Auckland scholarships website from 21st May. Posted: 5/9/13.

University of British Columbia Okanagan: I (Dr. Adam Wei) am currently looking for 2 Ph.D. students to work on forest hydrology. The research will focus on the effects of forest and climate changes on hydrology in large watersheds. An integrated approach considering statistics, modeling or geochemistry or landscape ecology will be applied. Applicants who have solid background on statistics, modeling and one of the landscape and geochemistry subjects are preferred. The standard salary plus applicable benefits at UBC will be provided. If you are hardworking, intelligent and ambitious, please send your CV to adam.wei@ubc.ca for an initial assessment. Posted: 3/4/13.

University of British Columbia: Call for Masters, PhD students and post-doctoral fellows: The NSERC-CREATE funded initiative TerreWEB (Terrestrial Research on Ecosystem & World-wide Education & Broadcast), at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, has funding opportunities for Masters, PhD and post-doctoral fellows available. National and international Students and post-docs from diverse academic backgrounds with interest in research and communication of global change / climate change issues are encouraged to apply. Deadlines are bi-annual (May 1, and December 1st). For further information visit http://www.terreweb.ubc.ca/. Posted: 12/13/11, revised: 6/27/12.

University of California, Berkeley: Several PhD positions are available as part of a newly funded project that seeks to merge two disparate areas of research to understand patterns of biodiversity, (1) a broad ecological approach which provides insights into how species assemble and interact in a community; (2) a lineage based approach which focuses on how species adapt, diversity, or decline over time. We will integrate these two approaches by using a system of age-structured biological communities on the youngest island of Hawaii and comparing these to communities on the next older island of Maui. Within Hawaii Island, lineages of organisms are actively diversifying, while the community and food web contexts in which they are embedded are changing with the development of their habitats. The system is relatively simple ecologically, but importantly it represents an environmental chronosequence, allowing for a "space-for-time" substitution. The project (part of NSF's "Dimensions in Biodiversity") will look at priority, sequence, and associated interaction strengths among members of a community as it develops, and hence how biodiversity is generated, assembled, and lost. Students interested in any one of the following are encouraged to apply: (1) macroecological metrics of diversity and abundance of species and how these might change over time; (2) dynamics of predator-prey or other interactions between species; (3) evolutionary adaptation and speciation. Data to be analyzed will include molecular, morphological, ecological, and/or behavioral characters, and will involve macroecological, macroevolutionary, and population genetic and phylogenetic analyses. A single student will focus on one aspect of the project, though interest in the integration between ecological and evolutionary approaches is encouraged. Project PIs at UC Berkeley are: Rosemary Gillespie (gillespie@berkeley.edu), John Harte (jharte@berkeley.edu), Neo Martinez (neo@PEaCElab.net), and Patrick O'Grady (ogrady@drosophilaevolution.com) in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management (ESPM); and Rasmus Nielsen (rasmus_nielsen@berkeley.edu) in the Department of Integrative Biology (IB). Other PIs are Dan Gruner (U. Maryland, dsgruner@umd.edu), Don Price (U. Hawaii Hilo, donaldp@hawaii.edu), Dan Rabosky (U, Michigan, drabosky@umich.edu) and Kerry Shaw (Cornell, KLS4@cornell.edu). Students interested in these positions are encouraged to email one of the PIs for more information. Applications to UC Berkeley must be received by Dec 1, 2012. For details see: applications to ESPM; and applications to IB. For grad programs at the other institutions, please contact the appropriate PI. Posted: 11/8/12.

University of California, Irvine: The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) welcomes applications from highly-motivated students to join our PhD program in the Fall of 2013. The department consists of a large and dynamic faculty spanning a diverse array of research areas including informal research groups in Ecology and Evolutionary Ecology, Evolutionary Genetics, and Comparative Physiology. The Ecology and Evolutionary Ecology group is a diverse set of faculty working on plants, animals, and microbes in the areas of evolutionary ecology, conservation biology, biogeography, functional ecology, population and community ecology, biogeochemistry and ecosystem ecology. There is a focus on integrating modeling, theory, and experimentation as well as developing collaborations among the Evolutionary Genetics and Comparative Physiology groups. Cross campus connections with the Department of Earth System Science are especially strong. Exceptional facilities and resources for carrying out research or integrating research with decision makers are available through the UC Natural Reserve System, the New Steele-Burn and Anza Borrego Desert Research Center, and the Center for Environmental Biology. The Evolutionary Genetics group features a diverse faculty working in both model and non-model systems. Specific areas of research include experimental evolution, genomics (experimental and computational), molecular evolution, population genetics, and quantitative genetics. There are strong connections with other programs on campus, particularly the UCI Center for Complex Biological Systems and the School of Information and Computer Science. For full consideration, complete applications (see admissions information) should be received by January 1, 2013. We strongly encourage prospective applicants to contact faculty members as soon as possible to discuss their research interests. Financial support for graduate students comes from a variety of sources, including teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships. Outstanding applicants will be considered for the Francisco J. Ayala Fellowship. Posted: 10/24/12.

University of California, Irvine: The Mooney Lab in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology welcomes applications for Ph.D. and M.S. students to begin in the 2013-14 academic year. Research in the Mooney Lab addresses both basic and applied questions relating to the community and evolutionary ecology of tritrophic interactions. Past studies have focused on natural plant-insect systems and the effects of vertebrate insectivores. Research opportunities include: a diverse faculty with strengths in ecology, evolutionary ecology, global change biology, evolutionary genetics and comparative physiology; greenhouse, growth chamber, common garden, mass spectrometry and stable isotope facilities; and access to the diverse ecosystems included in the UC Natural Reserve System. Graduate students are expected to develop independent research projects conceptually related to Mooney Lab research themes. Funding opportunities include guaranteed TA-ships, opportunities for year-long intramural fellowships, and assistance with applications for external multi-year graduate fellowship. Applications are due January 1 but prospective students should first direct inquiries to Dr. Kailen Mooney (mooneyk@uci.edu). Please include a statement of research qualifications, motivations for joining the Mooney Lab, and an example of a proposed thesis topic. Posted: 10/19/12.

University of California, Merced: We are recruiting a PhD student (1) and a postdoctoral researcher (1) to work on an NSF-funded project to examine the role of biotic interactions in determining species responses to climate change. Working at macroscales and using observed changes in biotic communities as recorded in fossil pollen and mammal assemblages spanning the past 21,000 years in eastern North America, we seek to develop and test new methods for incorporating biotic interactions into macroecological models. The qualified candidates will work closely with a multidisciplinary team comprised of Jessica Blois (UC-Merced), Matt Fitzpatrick (Appalachian Lab, University of Maryland), and Jack Williams (University of Wisconsin). The PhD student will reside in Blois’ lab in Merced, CA and the postdoctoral research will reside in Fitzpatrick’s lab in Frostburg, MD. PhD Student Details: One position is available to work in the lab of Jessica Blois at UC Merced. Candidates for the PhD position should have experience with paleoecology and/or biogeography. Experience working with R and with species distribution modeling is desired but not essential. Anticipated start date is Fall semester, 2013 (August 2013). Graduate Student Researcher funding is available for five semesters; the remainder of the PhD will be funded through Teaching Assistant positions. The student will be funded to develop paleo-species distribution models of plant and mammals across eastern North America as part of a broader PhD thesis focused on understanding the biogeographic responses of species and communities to Quaternary environmental change. To apply, please email a short cover letter describing your background, expertise, and interests to jblois@ucmerced.edu. Please include your GPA and GRE scores, along with contact information for three references, in your letter. The final candidate will be required to submit a complete application to the UC Merced ES graduate group and will need to meet the requirements for admission to the Environmental Systems graduate group. Review of applications will begin on 5/17/2013. Posted: 5/3/13.

University of California, Riverside: The Department of Environmental Sciences at UC Riverside is seeking graduate students to work on NSF-sponsored investigations of paleolimnology, aquatic ecology and isotope biogeochemistry of the Sierra Nevada. This work builds on the more than 30-year record of limnological and watershed research conducted at Emerald Lake in Sequoia National Park. These Ph.D Fellowships include a monthly stipend, full tuition and fees and funds to conduct research. Education and experience - An MS or BS degree in aquatic ecology, hydrology, limnology, or similar discipline is required. Experience in aquatic ecology, paleolimnology and stable isotopes desired. Candidates must have the ability to work at remote field sites. Applicants should e-mail, in a single pdf file, to Dr. James Sickman (jsickman@ucr.edu): i) a cover letter describing their education, research experience and career goals, ii) a CV and iii) list of references including contact information. Posted: 2/14/13, revised: 4/4/13.

University of California, Riverside: We are seeking a Ph.D or MS student to work on aquatic and terrestrial biogeochemical questions in high-elevation lakes and watersheds of the Sierra Nevada. This work builds on the more than 30-year record of limnological and watershed research conducted at Emerald Lake in Sequoia National Park. This four-year Ph.D Fellowship or two-year MS Fellowship includes a monthly stipend, tuition and fees and funds to conduct research. Education and experience – An MS or BS degree in aquatic chemistry, environmental engineering, ecology, environmental sciences or similar discipline is required. Training and experience in the use of environmental isotopes of C, N, H and O is desired and previous field experience in remote research areas would be a plus. Interested students should e-mail the following information, as a single pdf file, to Dr. James Sickman (jsickman@ucr.edu): i) a cover letter describing the applicant’s education, research experience and career aspirations, ii) a CV or resume and iii) a list of 2 or 3 professional references including their contact information. The starting date for the position is negotiable, but could be as soon as July, 2013, but, no later than January, 2014. Review of applications will begin on January 28, 2013 and continue until the position is filled. See also: Facility for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (FIRMS). Posted: 1/22/13.

University of Calgary: Two of my graduate students will be finishing soon, and so I’m looking to take on at least one and possibly two new graduate students, to start in Sept. 2013 or possibly earlier. I’m broadly interested in fundamental questions in population, community, and evolutionary ecology. I place high value on tightly linking theory and data. My students and I work in whatever model system is most appropriate for addressing whatever question we’re asking. We work in systems ranging from protist microcosms, to bean beetles, to alpine plants and pollinators. Guaranteed funding is available for two years (M.Sc.) or four years (Ph.D.), through a combinations of TAships, RAships, and other sources. For more information see the graduate program in the Dept. of Biological Sciences. The Dept. has over 160 graduate students, about 40% of whom are in ecology and evolution. Calgary is a city of over one million people, close to the Canadian Rockies, with all the opportunities for field work and recreation that implies. If you are interested, please first check out my lab website, and read this letter, which I ask all prospective students to read. It talks about my approach to science and mentoring, and includes some questions I ask of all prospective students. Then send me an email (jefox@ucalgary.ca) introducing yourself, and talking as specifically as you can about your interests and goals and how they fit with my lab. Please attach your CV, transcripts (unofficial is fine), and contact details for three references. I’ll be at the ESA meeting in Portland if you want to chat there. It helps to email me beforehand to set up a meeting; I may not have scads of free time once I arrive at the meeting. -Jeremy Fox (jefox@ucalgary.ca). Posted: 7/25/12.

University of Canterbury: A fully funded PhD studentship is available for freshwater ecology research at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, New Zealand. The scholarship is part of an ongoing project to investigate the effectiveness of riparian management and rehabilitation in agricultural streams. This project is funded by the Mackenzie Charitable Foundation and the current phase will focus on developing and trialling a number of potential rehabilitation methods. We are looking for a high calibre student who can undertake innovative research that will both improve understanding of fundamental issues and enhance current management. The student will work with a highly successful team of researchers consisting of two academics, a Post-doctoral Fellow, two technicians and a number of PhD and MSc students. In addition, there is opportunity for the student to develop their own research ideas as long as they fit within the overall focus of the research group. We would especially like to hear from students who wish to work on either; (a) the response of fish and invertebrate communities to in-stream habitat manipulations (e.g., channel morphology improvements, habitat remediation and sediment removal), or (b) the mechanisms and consequences of macrophyte control in small waterways, including experimentation on the effects of shading and drain clearance. Applicants need to have the potential to carry out insightful research, as well as the initiative and personality to communicate the results to a wide variety of groups, including scientists, landowners and general public. They must be able to work within a team and can expect high quality mentoring and support from the group. The successful applicant will have a strong academic record, appropriate practical and technical experience, and will have demonstrated a high level of ability in written and oral communication. The scholarship is for study within the Freshwater Ecology Research Group in association with Professor Angus McIntosh and Associate Professor Jon Harding, and is available now. The scholarship consists of a NZ $25k per annum student stipend (i.e., tax free living allowance) and funding to cover course fees and research expenses for three years. Applications should be sent via e-mail to Nicki Judson (nicki.judson@canterbury.ac.nz), administrative assistant in the School of Biological Sciences, by 31st July 2013, and should include: (i) a full curriculum vitae (including phone contact details), (ii) a copy of your academic record, (iii) a one page statement of your research interests and aspirations, (iv) the names and contact details of three referees who are willing to provide confidential comments on your capacity to undertake a PhD, and (v) an indication of your desired start date. The successful applicant may be required to submit copies of official documents, before being admitted to the PhD program at the University of Canterbury. Questions of an academic nature can be addressed to either Professor Angus McIntosh (angus.mcintosh@canterbury.ac.nz) or Associate Professor Jon Harding (jon.harding@canterbury.ac.nz). See PhD study for more information, including entry requirements. Posted: 5/13/13.

University of Cape Town: Project: Understanding the cause of the Martial Eagle decline in Protected Areas in South Africa. We invite applications for the above full-time research opportunity at the FitzPatrick Institute, a world-renowned, national Centre of Excellence (CoE) in ornithological research with a strong emphasis on postgraduate studies. The Martial Eagle is the largest eagle species in Africa, and has recently been uplisted by the IUCN from Least Concern to Near Threatened due to population declines. The species has a widespread distribution across most of sub-Saharan African and throughout much of this extensive range the species is now heavily reliant on protected areas. Within South Africa, dramatic declines of martial eagles within protected areas have recently been noted. This PhD research project will explore the potential cause of the species declines within protected area. Specifically it will test whether these declines are most likely due to problems faced by the species within and/or outside of protected areas. Firstly, the project will examine breeding success and survival of breeding adults nesting within protected areas. Adults will be fitted with GPS tags to document habitat use within the Adult’s home range. Using remotely sensed data the research will explore environmental correlates of breeding success. Secondly, the project will attach GPS-GSM tags to juvenile and sub-adult birds to understand their movements patterns, habitat use and survival rates both inside and, most importantly, outside protected areas. The results from this work will guide conservation recommendations aimed at ensuring the survival of this charismatic species in South Africa. Candidates should have a good Honours degree and an appropriate Masters degree (Ecology/Conservation) and should have experience carrying out bird research, preferably with raptors and in Africa. Funding is secured for an annual R100 000 CoE bursary for three years and adequate project running costs (w.e.f. Jan 2013). To apply, please send a CV (including your academic record & names and contact details of three referees) and a short motivation for why you wish to undertake this research to Hilary Buchanan at hilary.buchanan@uct.ac.za. Informal enquires can be directed to Dr Arjun Amar: arjun.amar@uct.ac.za. Closing date: 21st Dec 2012. Posted: 12/3/12.

University of Colorado: Two graduate assistant positions and one post-doctoral opportunity are available as part of an NSF-funded, multi-year study. The research focuses on the coupling of social and natural systems and on the future of ecosystem services in the Colorado Front Range (COFR). The project builds on a foundation of existing research in the region. The individuals will work primarily with Patrick Bourgeron and Hope Humphries at INSTAAR, but will also collaborate with Catherine Keske, Tim Seastedt, Mark Williams (INSTAAR), and other researchers involved in the NSF project "Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems in the Colorado Front Range Wildland/Urban Interface: Causes and Consequences", as well as Niwot Ridge LTER. GA 1 (Ph.D-level): Landscape analysis and modeling. Research will include synthesis of the qualitative and quantitative understanding elucidated for COFR, highlighting the human context, the hierarchical nature of the system, the attractors (system states) which may be accessible to the system, how the system behaves in the neighborhood of each attractor (potentially in terms of simulation model results), positive and negative feedbacks associated with an attractor, and changing resilience. Research will also include contributing to the further development of a spatially explicit landscape-fire-succession model (LANDIS) to examine the magnitude of landscape response to land-use change and corresponding disturbance effects on subsequent land use. GA 2 (MS-level): Land use land cover change. The research focuses on (1) using spatial representation of land cover and land use to identify patterns of landscape change in the Colorado Front Range (COFR) study area, and (2) integrating Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK) and other existing social data into theories and models of social-ecological change and their implications for human livelihoods. Postdoctoral fellow (2 years): The postdoctoral fellow should have a strong interest in sustainability science, and experience in conducting multivariate analysis, use of remotely sensed data, and development of spatially explicit landscape models in the context of regional change. The project includes analyses to define the boundaries of the social-ecological systems in the wildland/urban interface of Colorado, their key components, historical profiles, important ecosystem drivers, and characteristics of socio-economic structures. Prospective candidates should contact Dr. Patrick Bourgeron (patrick.bourgeron@colorado.edu) or Dr. Hope Humphries (hope.humphries@colorado.edu) for more information; please include a current resume and statement of research interests with your inquiry. Posted: 12/20/12.

University of Colorado: The Johnson Lab in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology is currently accepting applications for new graduate student positions to begin in Summer or Fall 2013. Currently we seek to fill positions related to two projects: 1. Global change and aquatic ecosystems: In collaboration with the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, this project is focused on lakes and reservoirs along the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Broadly, we are working to understand the short and long-term effects of climate change, nitrogen deposition and invasive species on biological interactions within these systems. The selected student would be expected to develop an MA or PhD-level project that helps to advance the project’s overall goals. 2. Understanding the community ecology of disease: this project aims to understand how interactions among species within an aquatic community collectively influence pathogen transmission and disease risk. This can include interactions among hosts (dilution effect), among parasites (coinfection), and between non-hosts and parasites (predation). The selected student would be expected to conduct field work in California (during summers). This project is best suited for students looking to pursue a PhD-level project. To apply, please send the following items in a letter of introduction to Dr. Pieter Johnson (pieter.johnson@colorado.edu): Curriculum vitae; GPA and test scores; your general research interests; previous experience and how you will contribute to work already being pursued in the lab; whether you intend to apply for a MA or PhD program; post-graduate career plans; why you are specifically interested in work being done in the lab; whether you have applied for any external fellowships (e.g., NSF or EPA). Closes: 12/1/12. Posted: 10/15/12.

University of Copenhagen: PhD Scholarship Phylogeography, Extinctions and Global Climate Change. Applications are invited for a PhD scholarship at the Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. The PhD candidate will be enrolled for a 3 year period starting between January 1 and March 1, 2013. This PhD project is part of a new Sapere Aude grant entitled "Species Extinctions Under Climate Change: Re-evaluating Extinction Risk" (EXTINCTIONs). EXTINCTIONs aims at assessing past and current population dynamics and extinction processes and how can this knowledge about the past help to better predict the future impacts of global change in biological diversity. The deadline for applications is November 30, 2012. More details. Posted: 10/18/12.

University of Edinburgh: PhD studentship in disease ecology, Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution. The dynamics of coinfection: understanding the immune- and resource-mediated mechanisms that drive within-host parasite interactions. Supervisors: Dr Amy Pedersen (Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh) Prof. Judi Allen (Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, University of Edinburgh) Dr Andy Fenton (Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool). Application instructions. Deadline: 18 January 2013. Individuals are typically hosts to a variety of parasite species, representing vast taxonomic diversity, and exploiting a wide range of host tissues and resources. This diversity creates a dynamic and complex parasite community within individuals, which may be structured by interspecific interactions, either ‘bottom-up’ (via resource competition) or ‘top-down’ (via the host’s immune system). Within-host interactions between co-infecting parasites can be critical to the fitness and dynamics of both the parasites and the host. A growing literature emphasises the potential importance of such interactions to population and community ecology and various longitudinal field studies have demonstrated the ubiquity of co-infection in the wild. However, evidence of interactions between co-infecting parasites in natural populations remains equivocal, and the mechanisms that drive these interactions have been poorly studied. Therefore many key questions remain unanswered, particularly relating to the type of mechanisms that shape within-host parasite communities, which is vital for the design of effective long-term disease control strategies. The aim of this interdisciplinary project is to investigate the mechanisms determining within-host parasite interactions, in order to better understand the consequences of coinfection for host health, and importantly, provide insight into treatment strategies for coinfected populations. This project will focus on the microparasite (viruses, bacteria, & protozoans) and macroparasite (nematodes, cestodes) communities of wild wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations in the UK, where coinfection is the norm (>70%). The aims of the project are (1) to develop immunological assays for wood mice in order to measure the immune phenotypes of wild mice, (2) to test whether resource competition or immune-mediated interactions structure within-host parasite communites, using data from experimental treatment studies in wild mice populations, and (3) to test the direction and strength of these mechanisms using controlled laboratory studies. Training will be provided in relevant immunological and parasitological techniques and the successful applicant will work with researchers with a breadth of expertise in ecology, immunology, evolutionary biology and host-pathogen interactions. The successful applicant will have a biological sciences degree, either a 1st or 2i, and possibly an MSc in ecology, immunology, or infectious disease/parasitology. Please send any informal enquires about the project to Amy Pedersen amy.pedersen@ed.ac.uk. Posted: 11/20/12.

University of Exeter, Cornwall: I am pleased to announce a suite of scholarships are available for students from across the world to study at the University of Exeter's Cornwall Campus next year. All of our MSc have a significant research component and we have a large number of ecologists and environmental scientists undertaking research-led teaching; many at the interdisciplinary interfaces. This includes staff from the Centre for Ecology and Conservation, Department of Geography, and the Environment and Sustainability Institute. Blurbs with links follow. Masters Distinction Scholarships of £5,000 are available for 2013. Find out more at www.exeter.ac.uk/lifesciences/postgraduate/cornwall, including our portfolio of challenging Masters degrees. Posted: 2/8/13.

University of Florida: Masters Position in Ant Biology. Research Focus: ant diversity, population genetics and citizen science (School of Ants). Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in entomology or closely related biological science. Applicants who have an intellectual interest in ants, evolution, ecology and outreach are especially encouraged to apply. Demonstrated ability to complete projects. Excellent written and oral communication abilities. Minimum GPA of 3.5 and competitive GRE scores are desired. Experience with the following will be an asset, but is not required: insect classification, collections management, systematics, DNA extraction and amplification (PCR), fieldwork, outreach/teaching. Apply: Interested candidates should send a letter by email addressed to Dr. Andrea Lucky at alucky@ufl.edu with the subject header ms position in ant biology. Please include CV, statement of purpose and names and contact information of three references. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis, but the suggested submission deadline is May 20, 2013, with the ideal start date in Fall 2013. Posted: 5/7/13.

University of Florida: We are looking for a second exceptional Ph.D. student to continue growing our research program in Swaziland. We have been examining the influence of the agricultural landscape mosaic on the diversity, density, genetics, diseases and movements of wildlife. Specifically, we would like a student to develop a project to better understand how landscape patterns and composition alter wildlife communities and their ecosystem services. This project can take many potential forms and will be a collaborative effort with researchers at University of Florida and the University of Swaziland. Potential mentors at the University of Florida include, Drs. McCleery, Fletcher, Austin and Wisely all in the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. This position will require students conduct research in Swaziland for extended periods of time. This is an extraordinarily challenging and rewarding commitment that should not be taken lightly. We are looking for a self-motivated independent student with a previous record of academic achievement and field experience in remote locations. Applicants must have completed or be in the process of finishing a M.S. Degree. Applicants must also have a minimum 3.5 grade point average, greater than 1250 on the GRE (312 on new scale), and considerable field experience. To apply, send a resume including GRE scores and GPA, a brief explanation how you are prepared for PhD program and over-seas research, and a list of 3 references to Dr. Robert McCleery ramccleery@ufl.edu by May 15th. We will begin reviewing applications as they come in. Posted: 5/2/13, revised: 5/13/13.

University of Florida: We are seeking a highly motivated M.S. student for the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, starting fall 2013. This student will work with Dr. Holly Ober and Dr. Bob McCleery to conduct research on the elusive Florida bonneted bat, Eumops floridanus. This species is believed to have the most limited geographic distribution of any bat in the U.S., and little is known about roosting or foraging ecology. The student will determine multi-scaled habitat selection patterns of the bonneted bat, estimate population demographics of bonneted bats at known roost sites, and develop monitoring protocols. The candidate must be willing to spend long periods of time in the field, working unusual hours as the biology of the species demands. Coursework will be taken in Gainesville and via distance courses during field seasons. Housing will be provided during field work. Preferred applicants will be highly motivated, independent, have field experience surveying bats through acoustic techniques and/or mist nets, have strong quantitative skills, and competitive GPA/GRE scores. Required: B.S. in wildlife, ecology, natural resource conservation, or a related field; strong quantitative skills and demonstrated writing ability; competitive GPA and GRE scores (>1200 or 308) preferred. Applicants should be willing to work independently in the field and in inclement weather. If interested, send a cover letter briefly describing your research interests, career goals, and why you would like to pursue a graduate degree; CV; unofficial copies of GRE scores and academic transcripts; and name, phone number and email address of 3 references. There is no need to pursue the official application process through the university until candidate selection is complete. Benefits: tuition, stipend, health insurance, and field expenses will be provided August 2013-December 2015. Closing date: Review of applications will begin 1 May 2013. Candidate will be identified by 15 May 2013. Start date is 21 August 2013. For more information, contact Dr. Holly Ober, University of Florida; 850-875-7150; holly.ober@ufl.edu (email preferred). Posted: 3/15/13.

University of Florida: The Smith Lab in the Department of Plant Pathology is recruiting motivated Ph.D. students for Fall 2013. We seek students who are broadly interested in fungal ecology, evolutionary biology, and symbiosis to study the biology of the Pecan Truffle (Tuber lyonii). Tuber lyonii is a common, edible truffle that forms symbiotic ectomycorrhizal associations with Carya illinoinensis (Pecan) and other angiosperms throughout the Southeastern USA. This commercially valuable species can fetch prices of $10-20 an ounce but up until now the biology of this species has been mostly unknown. For example: What is the population structure of Tuber lyonii? How does it disperse into pecan orchards? What soil and management factors may affect Tuber lyonii fruiting and govern competition with other ectomycorrhizal fungi? These are some of the many questions that the Pecan Truffle project is trying to answer. If you are passionate about fungi and/or ecology and would like to dig deep into truffle biology, please apply for this position. We want someone with: - A passion for biology and a BS (or MS) degree in biology or related subject - A background that includes ecology, evolution, and/or fungal biology - Strong written and spoken English language skills - Appropriate GPA and GRE scores - Laboratory experience in molecular biology techniques - Strong organizational skills and the ability to complete projects - A driver’s license and the ability to drive a car. To find out more, send your curriculum vitae and a short statement of your interest in the position to Matthew Smith at trufflesmith@ufl.edu or call 352-273-2837. Application Deadline: 7 December 2012. Posted: 10/19/12.

University of Florida: Graduate student opportunity in wildlife ecology and conservation. We are seeking a highly motivated M.S. or Ph.D. student for the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (WEC) at the University of Florida, starting fall 2013. This student will work as part of a team of researchers from UF (Dr. Rob Fletcher, Dr. Holly Ober), Emory University (Dr. Berry Brosi), and the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center (Dr. Lora Smith). The team will quantify species responses from several taxa (bees, reptiles, birds, and bats) to three major pathways for extracting biomass from pine forest as part of a recently funded grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. These responses will provide specific insight on effective indicators for sustainable biofuels production, will be integrated into a multi-scale model aimed to interpret large-scale effects and potential tradeoffs that may occur across regions, and will be used to develop best management practices for biofuels production with forest biomass. Preferred applicants will be highly motivated, have field experience with sampling bird and/or reptile abundance, have strong quantitative skills, and competitive GPA/GRE scores. The ability to begin field work in Spring 2013 (prior to matriculation at UF) is desirable, but not required. Students with strong initiative and desire to carve out their own research questions within this theme are highly encouraged to apply. If you are interested in pursuing a graduate degree on this project, please send Dr. Fletcher a CV, GRE scores and GPA, and a brief statement of your research interests, career goals, and why you would like to pursue a graduate degree prior to November 17 (email to: robert.fletcher@ufl.edu). Please see the WEC Graduate Program website for more details on application procedures. Also consult the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at UF for other opportunities regarding graduate admission. Posted: 9/27/12.

University of Florida: The lab of Craig Brodersen at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred, FL is seeking applicants for a fully funded PhD fellowship to study citrus physiology related to disease and drought resistance starting Fall 2012 or Spring 2013. The goal my research program is to better understand host-pathogen interactions, how xylem or phloem dwelling pathogens migrate through plant transport systems and become systemic, and ultimately to work with citrus breeding programs to develop new varieties. This position offers an unique opportunity to integrate newly developed in vivo visualization techniques (high resolution X-ray computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging) with traditional ecophysiology tools to address both basic and applied questions. Please send a single PDF file to brodersen at ufl.edu that includes a concise letter outlining your research and career interests, your CV or resume, and contact information for two people who can comment on your potential to succeed in graduate school. Posted: 9/6/12.

University of Florida: Now accepting applications for several PhD student & postdoc positions in insect evolution, systematics & symbiology Students seriously interested in any or all of the following should apply: • molecular phylogenetics • hi-tech morphological systematics • bark beetles, their ecology and evolution • symbioses among insects, fungi and bacteria • citizen science, science communication. Join a growing Forest Entomology and Symbiology team at the University of Florida on an NSF-funded project: http://www.ambrosiasymbiosis.org/. Please send your CV and a concise summary of your accomplishments and interests to hulcr@ufl.edu, or call for more info: 352-273-0299. Application deadline: February 15, 2013. Start date: flexible, the sooner the better. Posted: 8/29/12, revised: 1/4/13.

University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center: The lab of Dr. Craig Brodersen at CREC in Lake Alfred, FL is seeking applicants for a fully funded M.S. fellowship in Horticultural Science to study citrus physiology in response to citrus greening (a.k.a. Huanglongbing or HLB). This position is funded by a grant from the Citrus Research and Education Foundation with the goal of using plant growth regulators to mitigate the effects of HLB in field grown trees. This project will result in a better understanding of the host-pathogen interactions related to HLB, with a specific focus on phloem transport dynamics. This position offers a unique opportunity to integrate newly developed in vivo visualization techniques (high resolution X-ray computed tomography) with traditional ecophysiology tools to address both basic and applied questions. Please send a single PDF file to Brodersen@ufl.edu that includes a concise letter outlining your research and career interests, your CV or resume, and contact information for two people who can comment on your potential to succeed in graduate school. The deadline is September 15. Funding is available immediately, and the student would enroll for the Fall 2013 or Spring 2014 semester. Posted: 6/28/13.

University of Georgia: M.S. Graduate Assistantship in Forest Entomology. The Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources invites applications from highly motivated and enthusiastic students for a M.S. Assistantship starting in Fall 2013/Spring 2014. This collaborative work will focus on a newly documented scale insect species (Matsucoccus macrocicatrices) from southeastern U.S., its interaction with associated fungal species, and its contribution to canker formation and dieback/mortality of eastern white pine. Our major objectives are to: determine the range and severity of dieback, and fate of symptomatic white pine trees in the southern Appalachians; assess if white pine health varies as based on site conditions; and determine correlations between the scale insect, fungal pathogens, cankers, and health of eastern white pine. This work will be conducted in close collaboration with the USDA Forest Service, Virginia Department of Forestry, and other cooperators. The Forest Entomology laboratory is a dynamic group that works on a broad range of forest health issues, insect species, and ecosystem-types. We invite applications from highly self-motivated and enthusiastic students that are genuinely interested in working at the forefront of forest health issues. Training in forest entomology will be provided. Prior experience in forestry, entomology, and ecology will be an asset. A competitive M.S. assistantship for two-years along with full tuition waiver will be provided. Interested students should submit a letter of interest, current CV along with contact information for 2-3 referees, and unofficial transcripts to Dr. Kamal JK Gandhi (kjgandhi@uga.edu; 706-542-4614). Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Georgia: I am recruiting a PhD student to join my lab group in the Odum School of Ecology to contribute to a new research project on longleaf pine savannas of the southeastern US. The project will focus on biogeochemical cycles, particularly on N fixation (via herbaceous legumes, soil crusts and free-living bacteria) in the context of fire regimes and forest disturbance. This work builds directly on a series of studies in tropical forests (e.g., Barron et al. 2009; Wurzburger et al. 2012) that demonstrate the interactive role of P and Mo in regulating the process of N fixation within soils and across landscapes. The new student will receive a competitive 4-5 year research assistantship and benefit from interactions with collaborators from the Joseph Jones Center and Princeton University, as well as the dynamic community of ecologists in the Odum School and across campus at UGA. Strong candidates will have 1) an M.S. in ecology, soil science or forestry or have previous research experience in terrestrial biogeochemistry, and 2) have competitive GPA and GRE scores. Prospective students can contact me directly (Nina Wurzburger ninawurz@uga.edu) and send a CV and brief statement of research interests. Posted: 11/8/12.

University of Georgia: The Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources is seeking candidates for a PhD-level graduate assistantship to provide modeling-based research related to American alligator harvest management. The student, working with cooperators in three southeastern state wildlife management agencies, will lead an investigation into techniques to base harvest management on principles of biological regulation and resource sustainability. The work is almost exclusively quantitative and laboratory-based, including analysis of historic population and harvest data in hierarchical state-space models, construction and simulation of dynamic population models, and optimization of models. However, the student will also participate in structured decision-making workshops and consultations to identify policy objectives and constraints of the participating state agencies. The student will be encouraged to develop one or more research objectives that complement this work, and he/she will have opportunities to present results of this work at professional conferences. As a condition of this support, teaching assistantship duties may be assigned to the student once per year, as well as other related duties. The outcome of this work will help states evaluate their alligator harvest management policies and consider strategies that may better serve the needs of the resource and the public. The position is available beginning in the spring of 2013 (note: application deadline 15 Nov 2012) and will remain open until filled. The stipend is ~$18k per year, which includes a full tuition waiver and benefits. A contribution ($2k/yr) toward required fees is also provided. Applicants should have an M.S. in Wildlife Ecology, Statistics, Operations Research/Decision Sciences, or related fields. The most competitive applicants will have a strong background in one or more quantitative areas, including statistics, population modeling, or decision analysis. As the student will play prominent roles in stakeholder workshops, comfort and good communication skills in group settings are essential. For admission requirements, including relevant deadlines and minimum GPA and GRE scores, see prospective applicants. Prior to applying, qualified applicants should send a single email to Dr. Clinton Moore containing: 1) a cover letter that summarizes their interests, experiences, and qualifications for the project, 2) a CV, 3) a copy of all university transcripts, 4) a copy of recent (within 5 years) GRE scores, and 5) contact information for at least 3 references. Posted: 10/19/12.

University of Georgia: we are accepting applications for Fall 2013 for our Integrative Conservation (ICON) doctoral program. Funded assistantships are available to outstanding students. Currently the ICON Ph.D. program is open to students applying to one of four "home departments" including the Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, the Odum School of Ecology, the Department of Anthropology, and the Department of Geography. With the current rate of global change and human population growth, conservation and management of our natural resources needs to adapt to a complex set of challenges. Recognizing that responding effectively to these challenges requires both disciplinary expertise and well-developed tools to work across disciplines, the University of Georgia's ICON Ph.D. program is designed to meet that need by ensuring that students gain disciplinary depth while also learning to collaborate across fields of practice by engaging faculty from the natural and social sciences to train students in an integrative and holistic way. At the same time, this program strives to move beyond the paradigm of interdisciplinarity by reaching outside of academia to bring together academics and practitioners. Through internships, collaborative research, and a practitioner-in-residence program, students will interact with professionals engaged in management and conservation as partners and colleagues. These experiences, along with training modules led by communications experts, will ensure that students learn to communicate effectively and strategically with those from other backgrounds and disciplines as well as with lay audiences. For more information, please contact Talley Vodicka (talleyv@uga.edu, 706-425-2927) at the Center for Integrative Conservation Research. Prospective students apply to the program through a home department. As departmental application deadlines vary, please see individual departmental websites for details. Posted: 10/17/12.

University of Georgia: We are seeking a highly motivated graduate student to work on a project modeling freshwater connectivity and barriers to movement of aquatic organisms. The successful candidate will employ GIS based models to estimate connectivity and prioritize barriers according to their level of impact on connectivity, and potential consideration for removal. Qualified candidates will be given flexibility to develop their own interests on this project; however s/he will focus on testing existing approaches to modeling connectivity in 3 watersheds using a combination of existing data and field observations. The field work will consist of a rapid survey protocol for measuring connectivity-related metric. Qualifications: The successful applicant will be motivated, have well developed writing and communication skills, strong work ethic, and ability to work cooperatively in team setting. Experience doing field work in rough conditions is preferred. Proficiency using ArcGIS for spatial analysis, some programming experience, strong quantitative skills, and most of all, creative energy, are required! A BA/BS in a relevant discipline is required; some relevant experience outside academic programs is desirable. Historic average GRE scores and undergraduate GPA’s for MS students who enroll at the Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources are 1164 and 3.34, respectively. For further information please send a CV and a letter of interest (which should include a description of past research experience and skills) to Dr. Nate Nibbelink (nate2@uga.edu). Please also include list of relevant courses, undergraduate GPA, GRE scores, and transcripts (as available, unofficial OK). Review of applicants will begin immediately and competitive candidates will be invited to submit a full application. Our search will continue until a suitable candidate is found. Salary: Competitive stipend, tuition remission, health insurance contribution. Preference will be given to candidates able to begin in January 2013. However if no suitable candidate is found, we will consider applicants for Summer/Fall 2013, for which January 1 is the last date to apply to be considered for competitive UGA fellowships. Contact: Nate Nibbelink (nate2@uga.edu). Posted: 10/8/12.

University of Georgia: The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is recruiting a cohort of 7 M.S. and 5 Ph.D. level graduate students to work on various topics in the fields of radioecology, toxicology, conservation biology, and restoration ecology. Specific topic areas and faculty mentors include: Radionuclide and heavy metal contamination in long-lived reptiles (Dr. Tracey Tuberville - 2 M.S.); Scavenging ecology and contaminant uptake (Dr. Jim Beasley -1 M.S/Ph.D. and Dr. Gene Rhodes - 1 M.S.); Spatial ecology of vertebrates in relation to radionuclide exposure (Dr. Jim Beasley - 1 Ph.D.); Genomic biomarkers and genotoxicology in wildlife exposed to chronic low dose irradiation and/or metals (Dr. Stacey Lance - 1 Ph.D.); Amphibian ecotoxicology and evolutionary toxicology (Dr. Stacey Lance - 1 M.S.); Metagenomics of bacterial communities exposed to chronic radionuclide contamination (Dr. J Vaun McArthur - 1 Ph.D.); Biogeochemical quantification of tritium in living organismal tissues (Dr. John Seaman - 1 Ph.D.); Biogeochemistry, bioavailability and bioaccumulation of heavy metals in constructed wetlands (Dr. Gary Mills - 1 M.S.); Restoration ecology of invertebrate communities in erosion impacted watersheds (Dr. J Vaun Mcarthur - 1 M.S.); Soil restoration and erosion mitigation (Dr. John Seaman - 1 M.S.); and Mitigation of invasive species impacts on threatened and endangered species in the Pacific (Dr. Gene Rhodes - 1 Ph.D.). It is anticipated that students would start their programs of study in the spring or summer of 2013. SREL is located on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, approximately 2.5 hours from the main UGA campus. Students will be directly supervised by SREL faculty and will be appointed through various departments on the main UGA campus depending upon their ability to meet the admission requirements of individual academic units and the departmental affiliation of the SREL faculty member with whom they work. Prospective departments include: The Odum School of Ecology (Rhodes, Lance, McArthur); the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources (Tuberville, Beasley, Mills, Rhodes); and the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences (Seaman). Graduate Assistantship support for M.S. students ($21k) and Ph.D. students ($23k) will be provided to successful applicants on an annual basis. Students on an annual stipend receive tuition waivers, however student fees of approximately $1k per semester, which include the matriculation fee and activity, athletic, health, student facilities, technology and transportation fees will be assessed. Students should have a B.S. or M.S. degree in a field closely related to their prospective research topic. We are seeking students with a strong work ethic, excellent verbal and written communication skills, excellent quantitative skills, the ability to work independently and as a productive member of a research team, and the ability to perform work in challenging field conditions or in laboratory environments as required. Student must have a minimum 3.0 GPA and competitive GRE scores. Please contact the individual SREL faculty member with whom you are interested in working at the email address given below by October 15 for full consideration. With your email, please provide a statement of interest, a current C.V., copies of your most recent GRE scores, and a copy of your transcripts. If selected to compete for these assistantships, you will be encouraged to apply to the appropriate UGA department. Tracey Tuberville (tuberville@srel.edu); Jim Beasley (beasley@srel.edu); Gary Mills (mills@srel.edu); J Vaun Mcarthur (mcarthur@srel.edu); Stacey Lance (lance@srel.edu); John Seaman (seaman@srel.edu); Gene Rhodes (rhodes@srel.edu). Posted: 9/25/12.

University of Georgia: A PhD position is available starting in Summer/Fall 2013 at the Odum School of Ecology to study butterfly/pollinator ecology and behavior. The project will include investigating the effects of butterfly gardens on the diversity, foraging behavior and recruitment of butterflies and other pollinators and studying their interactions with enemies and disease. Research will be developed under the supervision of Sonia Altizer and Andy Davis. We are especially interested in applicants who have prior experience with insect ecology and insect-plant interactions; applicants must also be self-motivated and able to work independently. Those with a Masters degree are especially encouraged to apply. The project will involve overseeing experimental gardens and monitoring insect populations and behavior in the field. Opportunities also exist for larger-scale surveys, analysis of citizen science databases and focused laboratory experiments. Because field work will take place at the Wormsloe Historic site near Savannah, GA (4hrs from campus), a vehicle is essential and the applicant will responsible for coordinating transportation. To apply, please submit (1) a letter of interest describing your career goals and research interests, (2) CV, including past experience and prior publications, (3) transcripts, (4) GRE scores, and (5) contact information for three references to Dr. Andy Davis, akdavis@uga.edu. Inquiries received by Dec. 1 will receive full consideration. Candidates must also submit a formal application to the Ecology PhD program in the Odum School of Ecology or to the Integrative Conservation program. Posted: 9/25/12.

University of Ghent/University of Groningen: Vacancy for a joint Phd position on eco-evolutionary dynamics in a spatial context. According to classical island biogeography by MacArthur and Wilson (1967), immigration, speciation and extinction determine species diversity. However, diversity is not only an outcome of ecological and evolutionary processes but will also feedback on them. Thus eco-evolutionary dynamics are expected to determine macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns such as foodweb structure and phylogenetic relatedness. Within a joint doctoral program between the University of Ghent, Belgium and the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, we have an open PhD vacancy with a focus on these eco-evolutionary dynamics. Your work will combine theoretical (analytical and simulation models) and experimental (mesocosms) approaches. You will be supervised by Prof. dr. R.S. Etienne (Groningen) and Prof. dr. D. Bonte (Ghent). Description: • You will prepare a doctoral thesis in the field of eco-evolutionary dynamics • You will conduct this research at the Terrestrial Ecology Unity (Univ. Ghent) and the Community and Conservation Ecology Group (Univ. Groningen) Profile: • You are an enthusiastic and highly motivated student with a strong interest in spatial and evolutionary ecology • You are keen to combine experimental and theoretical approaches, to be a member of two dynamic labs • You are mobile and willing to travel between the involved research units • You have a Master degree in Biology or an equivalent degree in life sciences with a sufficient background in ecology, evolutionary biology and modelling • You have excellent study grades. Our offer: • We offer a PhD scholarship for two years, that will be extended for two more years after a positive evaluation • Starting date is 1 January 2013. Interested? • Send your CV, summary of study grades, and a motivation letter and the names of two referees by email before October 17th 2012 to Dries.bonte@ugent.be and R.S.Etienne@rug.nl. • For more information, contact Prof. dr. D. Bonte (+32 9 264 5213) or Prof. dr. R.S. Etienne (+31 50 363 2230) by phone or use the email addresses above. Posted: 9/14/12.

University of Glasgow: We are offering a fully-funded PhD opportunity for a student to work on quantifying mass migrations. This is an integrated project between ecology, medicine and statistics. The project aims to synthesize our empirical observations of two mass movement events: the annual migration of wildebeest in the Serengeti and cancer cells in the blood stream of patients. We aim to determine if there are commonalities that occur across these scales of organization that may capture the divergent behaviour of large congregations of organisms. The project would suit a numerate biologist or a physical/mathematical scientist with a keen interest in cellular or ecological problems. PhD Title: Universal laws of mass migration: From cancer cells to wildebeest. Institute of biodiversity, animal health and comparative medicine & School of mathematics and statistics. PhD Supervisor: Prof Jason Matthiopoulos, Prof Dirk Husmeier, Prof Robert Insall, Dr Grant Hopcraft. Enquiry by email: jason.matthiopoulos@glasgow.ac.uk. Description: Why do things behave differently when they are in groups? If we imagine that the suitability of an area degrades away from a specific point, then we should expect the movement of agents up and down this gradient to match the availability of the resource. For instance, more humans should migrate towards economic hubs, wildebeest should congregate in proportion to the available grazing, and the movement of cancer cells should be a function of the viscosity of the blood. However, this rarely occurs. In almost all circumstances, we observe more agents than we expect congregating in specific patches and these individual agents tend to move collectively. This aberrant behaviour of groups is consistently observed across all levels of organization from the movement of individual cancer cells in the human body to the mass migration of millions of animals. When individuals congregate and interact (via chemical, visual or aural communication), there is a fundamental switch away from our expectations which is suggestive of an underlying emergent property that has yet to be adequately quantified. This project will synthesize our empirical observations of the movement of cancer cells and GPS collared wildebeest and compare them to models in which movement is directly proportional to the resource. Our objective is to account for the observed variation in movement patterns of groups and determine if there are commonalities that occur across these scales of organization that may account for this divergent behaviour. Posted: 4/9/13.

University of Goettingen: We offer a three-year PhD position at the Department of Plant Ecology and Ecosystem Research, University of Goettingen, Germany to start on May 1, 2013. The position is funded for three years and includes full benefits. The PhD project will investigate the ecology of the tree rhizosphere as part of an interdisciplinary soil ecological research project (FOR 1806: The Forgotten Part of Carbon Cycling: Organic Matter Storage and Turnover in Subsoils [SUBSOM]) of the German Research Community (DFG). Project Description: The subsoil of temperate forests may be an important sink for carbon and an important source for water and nutrients. The PhD project will quantify the biomass and longevity of fine and coarse roots in deeper soil layers of European beech forests and will estimate their contribution to the carbon dynamics in subsoil. Root activity in terms of root exudation and specific N uptake capacity will be determined. Modern methods will be part of the research, e.g., root observations with mini-rhizotrons, in situ root exudate collection and stable isotope labelling. University and Study Program: The University of Goettingen is one of the highest-ranked universities in Germany with a high international reputation. A major research field of the Faculty of Biology at the University of Goettingen is biodiversity and ecology. The associated PhD Program Biodiversity and Ecology offers excellent opportunities for students to obtain a PhD degree in a 3-years graduate program. Requirements: Applicants should have a very good master or diploma degree in biology, environmental sciences, geosciences, soil sciences, or a related discipline. Candidates with laboratory research experience in biogeochemistry and experience with isotopic labelling are preferred. Fieldwork experience in ecological sciences is desirable. We are looking for an outstanding candidate, who is highly motivated, team orientated and willing to work precisely. Advanced command of English is required; willingness to acquire at least some basic German is desirable. The University of Goettingen aims in the areas in which women are underrepresented a rise of the women's portion and requests certified women explicitly to apply for this position. Severely disabled person people with commensurate suitability are considered preferentially. Application: Applications including a letter of motivation, research experience, CV, and (if available) copies of publications should be sent by March 31, 2013, to: Georg-August-University of Goettingen, Department of Plant Ecology and Ecosystem Research, “SUBSOM”, Prof. Dr. Ch. Leuschner, Untere Karspuele 2, 37073 Goettingen, Germany. Phone: +49-551-39-5722, Fax: +49-551-39-5701, Email: cleusch@gwdg.de Posted: 3/15/13.

University of Guelph: Graduate Student Position in Conservation Biology, starting in Fall 2012/Winter 2013. Gard Otis (School of Environmental Sciences) and Christina Caruso (Department on Integrative Biology) are seeking a M.Sc. student to assess the suitability of habitats for reintroduction of the Karner Blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) into Ontario. The Karner Blue butterfly once occurred in oak-savannah habitat in southern Ontario, where its larvae fed on wild lupine (Lupinus perennis). In 1990, it was designated by COSEWIC as extirpated from Canada. Although the Karner Blue has been successfully reintroduced into several sites in the United States, a 2003 evaluation indicated that none of the Ontario sites met the ecological requirements for a successful reintroduction. However, habitat restoration efforts have continued at these sites over the past decade. The Karner Blue Ontario working group is seeking a new evaluation that would determine whether these sites are now suitable for reintroduction of the butterfly. The M.Sc. student would evaluate whether potential reintroduction sites in Ontario meet minimum requirements for (1) larval host plant numbers and density, (2) adult nectar plant numbers and density, (3) presence of larvae-tending ants, and (4) light environment heterogeneity. Funding for the project will come from an NSERC industrial postgraduate scholarship, as well as from organizations in the Karner Blue Ontario working group. A B.Sc. in Biology, Ecology, Environmental Science, or a related field, with a minimum academic average of 80% in the last two years of study, is required. Experience with biological research, field work, and plant identification are highly desirable. This would be an excellent position for a student interested in a career in environmental consulting or habitat management. This position is only available to citizens and permanent residents of Canada. More information: graduate program in Environmental Sciences. Interested candidates should send a transcript (informal is fine), CV (including references), and a brief statement of interest to carusoc@uoguelph.ca or gotis@uoguelph.ca. Posted: 7/24/12.

University of Guelph: We are seeking 1 or 2 postdoctoral fellows (2 year terms) and 1 or 2 PhD students (3 year terms) to join in a recently funded project on modeling naturally occurring forest-grassland mosaic landscapes and their interactions with human interventions. Work will be based in the Global Ecological Change laboratory, School of Environmental Sciences, led by Professor Madhur Anand. The trainees will have the opportunity (and indeed may be required) to travel to Brazil and/or India to conduct fieldwork and meet with collaborators, but the work will mainly involve mathematical and/or computational modeling in Guelph. As such, applicants should have a strong quantitative skill set and ability to program in C, C++, Matlab, R or similar languages. Applicants should also have a publication record in ecological modeling, excellent communication skills, leadership potential and the ability to work well in groups. Trainees may be co-supervised with collaborators (e.g., Professor Chris Bauch, Mathematics and Statistics, Guelph). Please send a letter of interest indicating why your background is fitting, representative publications, a CV, and the names and contact information of three references to manand@uoguelph.ca. Start date is flexible (can be as early as Fall 2012) but preferably will be in Spring 2013. Posted: 7/11/12.

University of Haifa: The Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center seeks a highly motivated graduate student (PhD, possibly MSc), preferably with background in community ecology and interests in green roof ecology, to conduct thesis research on the integration of photovoltaic panels and green roofs. A short description of the proposed study is pasted below. Interested candidates should send their curriculum vitae, a short statement of research interests including how your current background fits with this research project, and contact information for at least three referees to Prof. Leon Blaustein (leon@research.haifa.ac.il) with a cc to Ms. Limor Dvir (ldaniely@univ.haifa.ac.il). Preferred starting date is between August and September 2013. Semester begins October 2013. Title: Integrating Bio-diverse Green Roofs and Photovoltaic systems. Abstract. Roofs can provide green opportunities – both solar photovoltaic (PV) technology for clean sustainable electrical energy and green roofs for mitigating storm runoff, reducing energy expenditure for heating and cooling buildings, and providing habitat for flora and fauna in a landscape otherwise depauperate of natural habitat. The latter benefit has received very little research attention. Green roofs and roof-mounted PV systems should not be considered competing roof options but rather, if placed together, should interact to improve the performance of both systems. Green roofs reduce roof temperatures and should thus improve the electricity-producing efficiency of PV panels. PV panels should reduce solar radiation and evaporation and increase solar radiation heterogeneity, consequently providing a wider range of niches for plants and animals yielding higher diversity and biomass in a hot, dry environment like Israel. Such benefits to green roofs and PV electrical production should be further increased by irrigation. Although tap water is scarce and expensive in Israel and elsewhere, irrigation of green roofs with gray water, should not only increase PV efficiency but also provide a water pollution abatement solution. While theory suggests all this to be the case, few studies worldwide and none in hot and dry environments have assessed such integration of green technologies. We propose to experimentally assess the integrative use of PV panels, green roofs and gray water irrigation for multiple environmental benefits including increased biodiversity and increased clean energy production. Posted: 4/22/13.

University of Haifa: I am seeking a graduate student (PhD, possibly MSc) to work in my lab concerning on how diversity of controphic species and predators influence mosquito populations. Prior background in population modeling and/or experimental ecology, mosquito biology, and aquatic ecology is desirable. The work will be funded by a four year Israel Science Foundation grant whose title and abstract can be found below. Dr. Matthew Spencer, University of Liverpool, serves as a consultant in this study, particularly for potential modeling studies. Interested candidates should send to Leon Blaustein (leon@research.haifa.ac.il) a curriculum vitae, (unofficial transcripts), a short statement of your research interests including how your qualifications fit with this particular research project, and contact information for at least three referees. Starting date between 1 October 2012 and 1 January 2013. Abstract: Species Diversity, Community Simplification and Mosquito Dynamics: Considerable theoretical and empirical evidence is accruing that species diversity causally and generally negatively affects such processes as disease infection prevalence and invasion success by unwanted species. Given the continued predicted decline in biodiversity, the concomitant losses of such ecosystem services should become increasingly important. Despite considerable recent exploration of this potential relationship with disease, prevalence and invasion success, mechanisms to explain these relations, and under what conditions they will occur, remain unclear. Surprisingly, biodiversity as a causal factor in preventing or dampening mosquito outbreaks has received little attention; not a single experimental manipulation across a diversity gradient has been conducted with mosquitoes. A comprehensive and novel study of this question is proposed here. We shall first examine how different natural and anthropogenic disturbances, which can have extensive impacts on community structure, affect mosquito dynamics in temporary pools. These include the frequency and timing of flash floods in wadi pools, desiccation followed by re-inundation, residual effects of a top predator (Salamandra infraimmaculata larvae) that enters temporary pools and then exits, and pesticides (both a broad-spectrum chemical pesticide and a bio-pesticide, specifically Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis). We shall measure how these disturbances affect community structure, mosquito oviposition habitat selection and larval performance. Using path analysis, we shall explore how changes in the community structure caused by the disturbances are responsible for changes in mosquito production. We intend to experimentally assess for the first time, how diversity gradients of species – both species sharing the same trophic level of mosquitoes and diversity of predators interacting with other factors such as bottom-up effects, affect mosquito production. We shall explore theoretically how diversity affects mosquito populations and test this empirically using tents which cage an initial mosquito population and manipulated diversity of competitors and predators. This proposed work will contribute conceptually to understanding the role of community and metacommunity structure in affecting invasibility success. The work will make particularly novel contributions to understanding the role of oviposition habitat selection in the overall question of biodiversity-invasibility in general and particularly with mosquitoes. The findings also will have strong applications in designing and managing habitats for the dual purpose of species diversity conservation and mosquito control. Posted: 8/13/12.

University of Hawaii Manoa: The Amend lab, in the Botany department, is recruiting enthusiastic and experienced graduate students for fall 2013. We study the ecology and evolution of fungi, with particular emphasis on those forming diverse communities associated with other organisms on land and in the ocean. To determine both the causes and consequences of these complex assemblages, we use a combination of next-generation sequencing, physiology, greenhouse experimentation and natural history observation within the natural laboratory of our beautiful Islands. Hawaii's isolation, diverse habitats and spectacular evolutionary radiations create an unparalleled setting in which conduct meaningful theoretical and applied research. Visit Dr. Amend's webpage for more information about our lab and the application process. Posted: 10/10/12.

University of Hawaii Manoa: Graduate Student Opportunities in Fungal Ecology. The Hynson lab in the Department of Botany is currently recruiting highly motivated, enthusiastic, and well qualified graduate students. We study fungal ecology with an emphasis on plant-fungal interactions such as the mycorrhizal symbiosis. The goal of our research is to deepen current understandings of the importance of plant-fungal interactions in natural environments. We accomplish this through field and laboratory experiments that utilize cutting-edge techniques in molecular ecology and ecophysiology. We are seeking graduate student applicants at the MS and PhD levels with strong backgrounds in ecology and/or fungal biology. For more information and how to apply visit the Hynson Lab website or contact Nicole Hynson at nhynson@hawaii.edu. Posted: 10/2/12.

University of Helsinki: Applications are invited for a PhD fellowship to study the interplay between ecology and genetics in shaping immune defence in natural butterfly (meta)population. The project is funded by the Kone Foundation (in Finnish only) Motivated students with a MSc degree in ecology, evolutionary biology or molecular biology (or other related fields) are encouraged to apply. Prior expertise in experimental design, statistical analysis or laboratory work are a bonus but your most important assets are enthusiasm for research, motivation to learn new things, and ability to work independently while being an active member of a research team. The project is centered within a larger study of the ecological processes and the underlying genetic mechanisms that allow the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) to cope with environmental challenges in the wild. This particular project will focus on the immune defence. In your project you will ask what are the significance of encapsulation response in terms of disease and parasitism resistance, how does it relate to other immunological assays, and if between individual variation influenced by population dynamics? In practice, you will carry out field work in the Åland Islands archipelago (SW Finland) and conduct experimental work in the laboratory and under semi natural field conditions. There is also potential to use recently developed genomic tools to identify genes involved in immune defence. You are expected to present your findings in scientific meetings and workshops, as well as prepare publications for international scientific journals. The research group of Dr Marjo Saastamoinen is part of the Metapopulation Research Group, Centre of Excellence appointed by the Academy of Finland, where you’ll find a wide range of expertise in ecological and evolutionary questions within a spatial framework. Please send your application to marjo.saastamoinen@helsinki.fi by 7 June 2013. Attach a CV (with publications included), a copy of your transcript records (= printout of the courses you’ve completed during your MSc), contact details of two references (e.g. MSc thesis supervisor), and a letter (MAX 1 page) with a description of your researcher interests and why you would be a suitable candidate for the project. The work is scheduled to start in August 2013. The Phd student will receive a personal researcher grant (2 100 € per month, 25 200€ annually). The Kone Foundation grants funding one year at the time, so funding for the successive years need to be applied. For more information, please contact Dr Marjo Saastamoinen (marjo.saastamoinen@helsinki.fi). Posted: 5/8/13.

University of Hong Kong: Ph.D. research assistantship in larval amphibian ecology. This project will examine how diversity in larval amphibian communities regulates ecosystem responses and determine at what levels of complexity increasing densities and water temperature destabilize these communities. The project consists of experiments that: (1) Evaluate ecosystem responses to manipulation of diversity in larval amphibian communities; (2) Quantify organism-level contributions and define functional roles; (3) Characterize the role that larval amphibian densities play in mediating ecosystem responses; and (4) Examine ecosystem-level responses when larval amphibian assemblages are exposed to increases in water temperature. Selected student must be able to start by January 2013. Applicants should be hard-working, self-motivated field biologists with a strong interest in larval ecology and ecosystem functioning. Field experience with amphibians is required and experience setting up and maintaining mesocosm experiments is preferred. Applicants must have successfully completed a research master’s degree in ecology or related field, have at least a 3.0 undergraduate GPA, and must have taken the GRE. International students for whom English is not their first language will need to have taken the TOEFL. Strong writing, oral communication, and statistical skills are important. Research assistantship provides a stipend of approximately $20k/yr, health insurance, and a tuition waiver. Prof. David Dudgeon of the University of Hong Kong will assume primary supervision; student would be co-supervised by Dr. Nancy Karraker. Prof. Dudgeon and Dr. Karraker maintain an active lab that focuses on stream ecology and conservation and currently includes five graduate students studying reptiles and amphibians. The medium of instruction at the University of Hong Kong is English. If a master’s degree has been completed, a PhD is obtained in three years with a relatively minor coursework load. To apply submit the following by email: a letter stating your qualifications and research interests, CV, copies of college transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for three references (not letters) by no later than 5 September 2012 (early application is encouraged!) to Dr. Nancy E. Karraker, Department of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (401-874-2916; nkarraker@mail.uri.edu). Note: I will be attending the 2012 World Congress of Herpetology in Vancouver in August. If you will attend the conference and would like to meet to discuss the position, please email me as soon as possible at nkarraker@mail.uri.edu. Posted: 8/9/12.

University of Houston: The Department of Biology and Biochemistry welcomes applications for its graduate program in Evolutionary Biology and Ecology for Fall 2013. The following faculty in the area of Evolutionary Biology and Ecology have opportunities available for their labs: Blaine Cole (bcole@uh.edu) - Evolution and social behavior Dan Graur (dgraur@uh.edu) - Evolutionary bioinformatics Dan Wells (dwells@uh.edu) - Evolution of development and behavior Diane Wiernasz (dwiernasz@uh.edu) - Sexual selection Elizabeth Ostrowski (eaostrowski@uh.edu) - Population genomics and social evolution George Fox (fox@uh.edu) - Experimental evolution and origin of life Gregg Roman (gwroman@uh.edu) - Evolution of behavior Nat Holland (jnhollandiii@gmail.com) - Ecology and evolution of species interactions Rebecca Zufall (rzufall@uh.edu) - Evolutionary genetics Ricardo Azevedo (razevedo@uh.edu) - Evolutionary genetics Steve Pennings (spennings@uh.edu) - Community ecology Tim Cooper (tcooper@central.uh.edu) - Experimental evolution Tony Frankino (wafranki@central.uh.edu) - Evolution of complex traits Yuriy Fofanov (yfofanov@bioinfo.uh.edu) -Evolutionary bioinformatics. See Information for Prospective Students. Application Deadline: February 1. Posted: 10/10/12.

University of Idaho: We seek a PhD student with interests in forest ecology, forest management, and ecosystem science to help conduct a research project on forest management. The goal of the project is to evaluate how the collection of woody residues to generate bioenergy following commercial harvests and pre-commercial thinning will affect forest carbon sequestration and greenhouse gases emissions relative to “business as usual” management. The PhD student would be responsible for estimating effects of management activities on pools of carbon and nitrogen in the soil, roots, trees, and woody debris. This would include supervising undergraduate students to conduct field sampling and sample processing. This is one of several new forest bioenergy research projects at the University of Idaho, so the PhD student will have the opportunity to engage with a cohort of graduate students with similar research. Candidates should have experience conducting fieldwork in forests or similar settings, and demonstrated organizational and analytical skills. Funding has been granted for a three-year research assistantship, including tuition and a competitive stipend. Applicants should send 1) a letter of interest and qualifications, 2) a resume that includes contact information for three references, 3) GRE scores, and 4) transcripts to Mark Coleman (mcoleman@uidaho.edu) and/or Alan Talhelm (atalhelm@uidaho.edu). We anticipate the student would officially apply to enroll for the winter semester, starting January 2014. However, the project is on-going and funds are available for the student to begin work immediately. Applications will be reviewed as they are received and review will continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Posted: 6/11/13.

University of Idaho: The following PhD and MS Assistantships are available in the Forest Operations Research Lab: 1) PhD Assistantship in forest operations modeling. This project involves developing a new geospatial forest operations and mobility model based on first principles of physical mechanics. The model will be linked with a forest growth and yield model (FVS) and hydrologic model (FASST), in order to simulate below-canopy terramechanic relationships among forest microclimate, equipment, and soil physical properties, and their coupled effects on the intra-annual timing and suitability of different operational systems used in forestry. The model will be validated in a designed experiment with operational data collected in 24 active logging operations in the northwestern U.S., across a range of slopes, stand characteristics, and seasons. Model predictions will be compared with those from a commonly used forest operations model developed under a narrower range of conditions. In the second phase of the research, we will deploy the new model, coupled with the FVS Fire and Fuels Extension, to simulate and evaluate long term interactions among silvicultural systems, forest operations, and below-canopy forest microclimate. Multi-objective forest management planning solutions based on the outcomes of spatial planning that optimizes sustainable forest management objectives and constraints related to silvicultural and operational systems, stand structural characteristics, spatiotemporal patterns among actively managed stands and natural areas, wildland fire, and hydrology will be evaluated under different climate scenarios. Within that framework, the student is encouraged to develop original research questions and hypotheses based on his or her interests. Contact Dr. Robert Keefe (robk@uidaho.edu) if interested. 2) MS Assistantship: modeling effectiveness and longevity of fuel treatments in dry mixed conifer forests. The Research Assistant will develop a new version of the Fuels Reduction Cost Simulator model in R. A supporting field study will be carried out to characterize emerging fuel treatment and biomass utilization systems for forestry, and the simulation model will be adapted to incorporate these systems. The model will be integrated into the BioSum suite of programs and used to evaluate the effectiveness and longevity of fuel reduction treatments in dry mixed conifer forests in the western United States at the landscape scale, using data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program. The Research Assistant will be advised by Dr. Robert Keefe at the University of Idaho, and will work with collaborators at the Pacific Northwest Research Station (Dr. Jeremy Fried) and Rocky Mountain Research Station Moscow Forest Sciences Lab (Dr. Terrie Jain). Prior experience with R or another programming language is helpful, but not required. Contact Dr. Robert Keefe (robk@uidaho.edu) if interested. To apply: Please complete a graduate application. Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, transcripts, GRE scores, and the names of three references. Posted: 6/10/13.

University of Idaho: Funding is available for a Ph.D. student to study forest responses and vulnerability to climate change and natural disturbances, with an emphasis on bark beetle outbreaks. Project goals include incorporating a model of mountain pine beetle outbreaks into an ecosystem model; assessing the influence of future climate changes on outbreaks; and quantifying the effects on forest dynamics, including carbon cycling. Research will be conducted jointly with Oregon State University using the Community Land Model. Funding is available for five years at $24k/year plus tuition/fees and health insurance. The successful candidate will have a background in geography, ecology, biogeosciences, atmospheric science, entomology, or a related field. Desirable qualifications include quantitative skills, familiarity with mechanistic ecosystem modeling and computer programming, excellent written and oral communication skills, and a research-based M.S. thesis. Students have the opportunity to receive a degree in either Geography or Environmental Science. Interested applicants should send a cover letter, CV, GPA, GRE scores, and a personal statement that describes the candidate’s interest in the position and relevant education and experience to Dr. Jeffrey Hicke (jhicke@uidaho.edu) as well as apply to the desired degree program. Inquiries via email or phone (208-885-6240) are welcome. Posted: 12/3/12.

University of Idaho: The McCall Outdoor Science School (MOSS) is currently recruiting for next years' graduate student class. Graduate students will provide field-based environmental education programs at MOSS. The work will take place at Idaho's only residential outdoor science school and at various schools around the state. Gain teaching experience, study ecology in a field setting, and develop leadership skills while living in a spectacular natural environment. In addition, students will earn a Master of Science in Natural Resources from the University of Idaho in as little as three semesters, or can opt for several other M.S. degree programs. For a full position announcement and to learn how to apply, please visit http://www.uidaho.edu/cnr/moss/graduate-program. For further questions, please contact Dr. Karla Eitel at (888) 634-3918; kbradley@uidaho.edu. Priority Deadline: January 15, 2013; applications will be processed on a rolling basis after January 15 until all positions are filled. Posted: 12/13/12.

University of Idaho: Ph.D. Assistantships to Study Conservation Policies, Land Use Change and Ecosystem Services in Central America. We seek sincere, motivated, creative individuals to apply for two exciting Ph.D. assistantships newly funded by NASA to conduct an interdisciplinary analysis of the impact of land tenure and conservation policies on forest cover change and ecosystem services in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. Both students will join a dynamic team of researchers from the University of Idaho and the Center for Tropical Research and Education in Agriculture (CATIE) in Costa Rica. The Ph.D. assistantships include tuition, fees and health insurance; both students will complete their degree programs in the University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources. In addition, this project is part of the NASA Land Use/Land Cover Change program, offering myriad opportunities for interdisciplinary networking and professional growth. One assistantship will focus upon ecological analysis and remote sensing in tropical landscapes. Within the interdisciplinary team context, the selected student will specifically contribute to (1) remote sensing of land cover change, (2) construction of geospatial data sets, and (3) field-based measurements of aboveground carbon and biodiversity. While we welcome and encourage all motivated individuals to apply, desired skills for this position include interdisciplinary problem solving skills, experience with geospatial, statistical, and ecological analyses, and Spanish language skills. To inquire about this position, send your CV and a 1-page letter describing your qualifications and career objectives by December 15, 2012 to Dr. Lee Vierling at leev@uidaho.edu. The second assistantship will focus upon the impacts of land tenure and conservation policies on land cover change. Within the interdisciplinary team context, the selected student will contribute to (1) construction of socioeconomic datasets, (2) field-based household surveys in and around conservation areas, and (3) statistical analysis of drivers of land use change. While we welcome and encourage all motivated individuals to apply, desired skills for this position include interdisciplinary problem solving skills, experience with geospatial, statistical, and economic analyses, and Spanish language skills. To inquire about this position, send your CV and a 1-page letter describing your qualifications and career objectives by December 15, 2012 to Dr. Kelly Wendland at kwendland@uidaho.edu. After initial inquiries, full applications should be completed at http://www.uidaho.edu/graduateadmissions. Positions will start as early as May 2013 but no later than August 15, 2013. Applications will be reviewed as received, with a preference towards those completed by February 1, 2013. For additional information or questions about this posting please contact: Dr. Kelly Wendland (kwendland@uidaho.edu, 208-885-7044). Posted: 11/1/12.

University of Idaho: PhD Research Assistantship in Wildlife Ecology. This research assistantship is part of an NSF-funded project to examine functional habitat relationships and tradeoffs among habitat components. The PhD student will be responsible for evaluating thermal and security aspects of habitat relationships for a habitat specialist (pygmy rabbits) and a habitat generalist (cottontail rabbits). Research will include animal capture, telemetry, measurement of habitat components in the field, construction of thermal physical models, participation in trials with captive animals, modeling habitat selection, use of GIS to synthesize habitat data, and mentoring undergraduate students. This research is a collaborative effort that includes faculty and students from 3 universities, and biologists from state and federal management agencies. We are looking for a student who is strongly interested and enthusiastic about in working in a collaborative and interdisciplinary team. Requirements: Applicants must have an M.S. or equivalent degree in biology, ecology, wildlife, or a related field. A record of field-based research and communication of research results (publications and presentations) also is required. Start date: January 2013. Application: Please email a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial copies of both are OK), and names/contact information for 3 references to Dr. Janet Rachlow, Department of Fish and Wildlife Sciences, P.O. Box 441136, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1136. jrachlow@uidaho.edu. Posted: 9/6/12.

University of Idaho: PhD Assistantship--Carbon Cycle impacts of Using Forest Harvest Residues for Bioenergy. The University of Idaho is one of the few universities in the US that use energy generated from logging residues to heat its campus (Science 2009, 323:1432-3). The presence of the UI Experimental Forest on nearby Moscow Mountain provides an opportunity to study the long-term effects of collecting the residual material that is usually left to decay or burned after forest harvest. We offer a Ph.D. assistantship that would address the practical, but scientifically compelling question of how greenhouse-gas emissions are affected by either a) burning residues on-site or b) collecting residues for fuel compared to unharvested controls. The student will be responsible for the measurement of forest carbon pools as well as the fluxes of carbon (CO2, CH4) and nitrous oxide from the soil after the various treatments. We would also encourage the parameterization of models that describe these fluxes and changes in forest productivity under the varied treatments. We encourage creativity and student initiative in designing the remainder of the dissertation. The PhD student will be part of the PhD program in the UI College of Natural Resources and will be primarily advised by Dr. John Marshall, with additional supervision by collaborators Dr. Alan Talhelm and Dr. Mark Coleman. Another related and concurrent forest bioenergy research project overseen by Dr. Coleman, which investigates impacts on tree growth, soil quality, wood decomposition, and diversity of fungi and invertebrates, provides clear opportunities for collaboration among a large group of investigators and a cohort of several new graduate students. Funding has been granted for a 3.5 year research assistantship, covering tuition and a stipend. To enquire about this position or to apply send an email to John Marshall (jdm@ uidaho.edu) or Alan Talhelm (atalhelm@uidaho.edu). Applicants should send 1) a letter of interest and qualifications, 2) a resume that includes three references, 3) GRE scores, and 4) transcripts. We will begin to review applications on September 1st. Posted: 8/13/12.

University of Idaho: Graduate Assistantship in Silviculture. We seek a highly motivated graduate student for spring semester 2013 to work on a regional stand density management project focused on removal of small diameter trees to improve growth, vigor and resilience of residual stands. Project objectives include identifying growth-density relationships and determining the growth phase for maximum response to density treatment. Projects are located on private and public conifer forest lands between the Cascades and the Western Rockies. Successful candidates will collaborate and communicate among numerous land management organizations included in the Intermountain Forest Tree Nutrition Cooperative. Desired background includes strong quantitative and writing skills, field forestry experience, and knowledge of: intermediate stand silviculture, forest soil properties, and ecosystem science. For questions about this position or to apply send an email to Mark Coleman (mcoleman@uidaho.edu). Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, transcripts, GRE scores and the names of three references. Applications will be reviewed starting 1 September 2012. Posted: 8/13/12.

University of Idaho: PhD Assistantships on Sustainable Forest Bioenergy. We seek three graduate assistantships for winter 2013 to collaboratively study forest ecosystems responses to biomass removal for biofuel production. Project objectives include developing ecological indicators of removal impacts including tree growth, soil quality, wood decomposition, and diversity of fungi and invertebrates. Projects are located in northern Idaho conifer ecosystems, which are managed for products, recreation, water and wildlife. Successful candidates will collaborate and communicate across disciplines, have good quantitative and writing skills, and have interest in, and knowledge of forest bioenergy production systems. Applications will be reviewed starting 15 August 2012. 1) PhD Assistantship in forest, soil and nutrient cycling. The research focus for this assistantship will be on how the collection of woody residues for bioenergy production will affect tree growth and canopy responses, carbon and nutrient cycles in residues and soils, the flux of greenhouse gases and the availability of plant growth resources. Desired background includes forest management, soils, biogeochemical cycling, microbial ecology, and ecosystem science. The PhD student may select from programs in the University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources or Environmental Science. Questions about this position or to apply send an email to Mark Coleman (mcoleman@uidaho.edu). Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, transcripts, GRE scores and the names of three references. 2) PhD Assistantship in fungal diversity. The research focus for this assistantship will be on quantifying the effects of biomass harvesting on wood-inhabiting fungal communities using both fruiting bodies and DNA-based survey methods and determining whether changes in the fungal community result in increased or decreased wood-decomposition rates. Desired background includes introductory and advanced mycology courses, biochemistry, statistics, and ecosystem sciences. The PhD student may select from programs in the University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources or Environmental Science. To enquire about this position or to apply send an email to Daniel Lindner (dlindner@fs.fed.us) and David Tank (dtank@uidaho.edu). Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, transcripts, GRE scores and the names of three references. 3) PhD Assistantship in invertebrate diversity. The research focus for this assistantship will be on examining how the collection of woody residues for bioenergy production will impact invertebrate community parameters of non-pestiferous species. The research will focus on ground and soil-inhabiting groups including mites, springtails, ground beetles, ants and gastropods. Desired background includes invertebrate population and/or community ecology. The student may select from the Entomology program in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences or the Environmental Sciences program. To enquire about this position or to apply, send an email to Stephen Cook, (stephenc@uidaho.edu). Applications should include a letter of interest, CV, transcripts, GRE scores, and the names of three references. Posted: 8/2/12.

University of Idaho: Ph.D. Assistantship: Arctic Ecology and Remote Sensing. We seek sincere, motivated, creative individuals to apply for an exciting Ph.D. opportunity to work in the Alaskan Arctic, and possibly other ecosystems. This project will research links among Arctic tundra shrub development, climate and trophic chain dynamics, and thresholds in carbon cycling. The accepted candidate will learn cutting edge remote sensing tools in ecological remote sensing, including laser altimetry (lidar) and spectral image analysis. The project will take place as part of a dynamic, interdisciplinary team at the University of Idaho (Lee Vierling and Jan Eitel) and Columbia University (Natalie Boelman and Kevin Griffin). Financial support is available via a newly funded NASA project as part of the NASA Terrestrial Ecology and North American Carbon Programs, providing myriad opportunities for interdisciplinary networking and professional growth. Start date is either January or May 2013, with the student headquartered at the U. of Idaho. For more information, please send your CV, electronic transcripts, and brief statement of interest to Dr. Lee Vierling at leev@uidaho.edu. Posted: 7/24/12.

University of Illinois: Funded, immediate opening for a PhD or MS student in the area of foreclosure effects on residential landscapes. Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences program. Deadline: May 15, 2013. Start date: August 16, 2013. Advisor: Dr. Bethany Cutts Research area: Residential landscape change as a social-ecological process. The successful student will work with geographers, landscape ecologists, and environmental social scientist to integrate large-scale datasets to answer questions about changes in property management that occur through changes in property management, social norms, and/or policy changes. Qualified candidates could come from a variety of disciplines and departments including but not limited to: Natural Resource Management, Environmental Science, Geography, Ecology, Sociology, Landscape and Urban Planning, or Economics. Desired qualifications: The successful applicant must demonstrate leadership skills, the ability to develop independently, and perform quantitative analyses. The selected applicant will have demonstrated strong interest in interdisciplinary research and experience with urban social and/or ecological processes and an ability to think creatively and learn independently. He or she must meet the departmental minimums for GRE scores. Experience with statistical analyses in R and remote sensing image processing are desirable, but not necessary. The ideal candidate will possess a master’s degree by the starting date and prior research experience and/or demonstrated competency in spatial analysis, remote sensing or advanced statistical techniques. The selected candidate will be offered salaried support commensurate with degree and will be eligible for university benefits and tuition waivers. If you are interested in developing a dissertation or thesis project in this area while being trained in a multidisciplinary academic department, please email Bethany Cutts (bcutts@illinois.edu) with a statement of interest and your CV as soon as possible. If no suitable candidate is identified by the May 15 application deadline for Fall 2013, the position will re-listed and applications for Spring 2014 or Fall 2014 will be invited. Posted: 5/2/13.

University of Illinois: MS assistantship: Mapping the spread of water hyacinth in a large river. A research assistantship ($18,600 per year for 2.5 yr) through the Illinois Natural History Survey and the University of Illinois Dept of Natural Resources and Environmental Science is available for a thesis project looking at techniques for documenting the status of aquatic invasive plants in the upper Illinois River. More details. Applicant review will begin before 15 May 2013. Posted: 5/1/13.

University of Illinois: A Graduate Research Assistantship (M.S.) is available starting Summer 2013 in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences. Research will focus on the biogeochemical impacts of hemlock loss along a nitrogen availability gradient in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The ideal candidate will have a strong interest in ecosystem and landscape ecology and a B.S. in ecology or a related discipline. Preference will be given to applicants with field experience, competitive GRE scores, and strong written and interpersonal skills. Interested students should contact Dr. Jennifer Fraterrigo (jmf@illinois.edu) and include a statement of research interests and experience, GPA, and GRE scores and percentile ranks. The selected candidate will be supported with a stipend and a tuition waiver. Dr. Jennifer Fraterrigo, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801. e-mail: jmf@illinois.edu. Posted: 4/17/13.

University of Illinois: A Graduate Research Assistantship (M.S.) is available starting Fall 2013 in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences. Research will focus on the relationship between hydrology and the establishment of restored floodplain forest. The ideal candidate will have a strong interest in applied ecology and a B.S. in ecology, botany, environmental science or a related discipline. Preference will be given to applicants with experience in field research, GIS or the flora of the Midwestern U.S. Interested students should contact Dr. Jeff Matthews (jmatthew@illinois.edu) and include a statement of research interests and experience, GPA, and GRE scores and percentile ranks. The selected candidate will be supported with a stipend and tuition waiver. To be selected, a candidate must be admitted to the graduate program in Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences. Dr. Jeffrey W. Matthews, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801. e-mail: jmatthew@illinois.edu. Posted: 4/9/13.

University of Illinois at Springfield: I am recruiting a MS-level graduate student (M.S. in Environmental Science) to participate in an on-going research project on Franklin's ground squirrel (Poliocitellus franklinii), a state-threatened species in Illinois. The graduate research assistantship should be available for two years with a January 7, 2013 start date. The assistantship will provide tuition and service fee waiver, a stipend for the spring and fall semesters, summer salary, and research support. The selected student will be able to pursue a thesis topic related to habitat management or habitat connectivity for Franklin's ground squirrel. The student must have a strong work ethic, leadership skills, keen attention to detail, ability to follow directions, and ability to supervise a field crew of undergraduate research assistants during the field seasons. Applicants should have a background in ecology or environmental science. Experience or coursework in GIS and/or GPS is highly desirable. Experience with wildlife trapping, handling, and PIT-tagging would be plus. Interested students should email the following to Dr. Tih-Fen Ting at tting1@uis.edu as soon as possible. 1. Cover letter addressing background, qualifications, and research interest. 2. Resume, including contact information for three references. 3. Transcripts (unofficial or scanned copy acceptable). Suitable candidates will also be encouraged to submit a formal application to the graduate research assistantship program. Please do not hesitate to email me if you have questions. Posted: 10/29/12.

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: A Graduate Research Assistantship (M.S. or Ph.D.) is available starting Fall 2013 to study the consequences of hemlock decline for biogeochemical cycling. Fieldwork will be conducted in the southern Appalachians of western North Carolina in cooperation with researchers at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, which is part of the Forest Watershed Science Research Work Unit of the US Forest Service. Applicants should have at least a 3.2 GPA and competitive GRE scores. Additionally, individuals should be highly motivated and have excellent writing and analytical skills. Candidates must be able to work independently. Preference will be given to applicants with experience performing ecosystem process measurements. If you are interested, please contact Dr. Jennifer Fraterrigo (jmf@illinois.edu), Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801. In your initial contact, please include a statement of your research interests and experience, GPA, and GRE scores and percentile ranks. Posted: 12/3/12.

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Dr. Jonathan Greenberg and the Global Environmental Analysis and Remote Sensing (GEARS) Laboratory is currently inviting applications for Doctoral or Master's work starting in Fall 2013 for students interested in one or both of the following topics: Landscape Level Plant-Climate Interactions: Students should be interested in applying remote sensing, GIS, and modeling to the following questions at local to global scales: - How do plants respond to their climate at multiple scales? - What will be the future state of vegetated ecosystems under climate change? - How do non-climate factors impact the distribution of plants? Students interested in this topic are encouraged to apply to either the Department of Geography and GIScience and/or the Program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology (PEEC). A degree or background in biogeography, environmental science, ecology, and/or biology is encouraged for applicants, as well as previous experience in remote sensing and GIS. Remote Sensing Science: Students should be interested in developing advanced remote sensing algorithms, particularly those that leverage high performance computing and machine learning algorithms. GEARS is interested in the following general topics: - Computer vision techniques applied to high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery - Fully automated pre-processing techniques including orthorectification and atmospheric correction - Radiative transfer modeling and model inversion - Advanced techniques in hyperspectral, hyperspatial, multitemporal, thermal, and Lidar data processing Students interested in this topic are encouraged to apply to the Department of Geography and GIScience. Previous programming experience and a background in remote sensing and GIS is highly recommended. Prospective graduate students will be expected to develop their own research goals, and should have curiosity, motivation, and independence. Prospective students are encouraged to review the research program of Dr. Greenberg, and email a short summary of their research interests as well as a CV to Dr. Greenberg (jgrn@illinois.edu) before applying to the program. Applications to the Department of Geography and GIScience are due January 13. Applications to the Program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology (PEEC) are due January 1, 2013. Funding will be available from a variety of sources, including fellowships, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships. Posted: 11/20/12.

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: A Graduate Assistantship (Ph.D.) is available to study the effects of invasive species and prescribed fire on plant recruitment and carbon cycling in the lab of Dr. Jennifer Fraterrigo. Work will be conducted in southern Illinois, within the Central Hardwoods Region, and will focus on Microstegium vimineum, a C4 annual grass that is currently invading deciduous forests throughout the eastern U.S. Research in the Fraterrigo lab addresses the consequences of spatial heterogeneity due to physical and biological processes for ecosystem processes, with the goals of advancing theory regarding the resilience of ecosystems subjected to environmental changes; and providing information that will enhance the management of ecosystems within a landscape context. Qualifications: Applicants should have at least a 3.5 GPA and competitive GRE scores. Additionally, individuals should be highly motivated and have excellent writing and analytical skills. Candidates must be able to work independently. Preference will be given to applicants with demonstrated experience with GIS, ecosystem measurements, and statistical modeling. Interested candidates should e-mail Dr. Jennifer Fraterrigo (jmf@illinois.edu) a single PDF file containing the following information: - Cover letter outlining research interests and professional goals - Resume - Copies of transcripts (unofficial copies acceptable) - GRE scores and percentiles (if not available, indicate when exam will be taken) - Names and contact information for three references. Applications will be reviewed upon receipt, and promising candidates will be invited to submit formal applications to a UIUC graduate program (PEEC or NRES). For further information, contact: Dr. Jennifer M. Fraterrigo (jmf@illinois.edu), Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Turner Hall, MC-047, 1102 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. Phone: (217) 333-9428, Fax: (217) 244-3219. Posted: 9/14/12.

University of Kansas: The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Kansas Biological Survey has a position available for a student seeking a Master's degree starting in fall 2013. The successful applicant will analyze and further develop a long-term data set describing patterns of forest succession at the KU Field Station, which represents the eastern deciduous forest/tallgrass prairie ecotone. The student will be jointly mentored by community ecologist Dr. Bryan Foster and ecosystem ecologist Dr. Sharon Billings. Field work will include re-sampling forest plots established in the 1980s to investigate spatial and temporal patterns in tree demography and forest succession. The particular focus of the project will depend on student interest and project trajectory, but likely will test ideas pertaining to forest community establishment, succession and persistence, links between community composition and ecosystem function, and ecological theory. Experience with any or all of these topics is desirable. The successful applicant must be eager to contribute to our labs' capabilities and intellectual environment, and can benefit from the broad expertise of the EEB's faculty members. Information on the EEB graduate program and the application procedure: http://www2.ku.edu/~eeb/graduate/. Interested candidates should send a c.v., brief statement of purpose demonstrating scientific interests and writing acuity, and a brief description of their educational background that includes a list of science and mathematics classes to Dr. Sharon Billings at sharonb@ku.edu or to Dr. Bryan Foster at bfoster@ku.edu. Posted: 9/7/12.

University of Kansas: The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology has positions available for two Ph.D. students starting in fall 2013. Successful applicants will examine the effects of warming and altered precipitation regimes on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics (see Sharon Billings's website for on-going projects). Lab work will offer opportunities to gain experience with gas chromatography, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, multiple means of quantifying soil organic matter composition, microbial community structure and function, and greenhouse gas generation and fluxes. Experience with any or all of these topics is desirable; scientific research experience is required. Applicants must be eager to contribute to the lab's capabilities and intellectual environment, and can benefit from the broad expertise of the EEB's faculty members. Information on the EEB graduate program and the application procedure: http://www2.ku.edu/~eeb/graduate/. Interested candidates should send a c.v., brief statement of purpose demonstrating scientific interests and writing acuity, and a brief description of their educational background that includes a list of science and mathematics classes to Dr. Sharon Billings at sharonb@ku.edu. Posted: 9/7/12.

University of Kent: I (Dr David L. Roberts) have full funding (European/UK students only) for a PhD titled "The benefits of biodiversity: understanding human-wildlife interactions in urban environments". See the full job ad for details and to apply. Deadline: 30th April 2013. Posted: 4/10/13.

University of Konstanz: The Meyer lab at the University of Konstanz, Germany, member of the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology, is offering two fully-funded three-year PhD positions: Ecology and genomics of parallel speciation of cichlid fishes in Nicaraguan crater lakes. The successful applicants will participate in the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology, the PhD program of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen and Radolfzell and the University of Konstanz. All IMPRS students are supported by stipends or contracts. The program offers a dedicated teaching program, high quality research experience, and outstanding research facilities in an inspiring research and living environment. The working language is English. Each PhD student receives individual supervision and mentoring and is guided in her/his research work by a PhD advisory committee. Qualification Applicants should hold a MSc or equivalent degree in biology or a related discipline at the point of enrollment. Queries should be mailed to the IMPRS program office: IMPRS@uni-konstanz.de Deadline for the application is January 15, 2013. Interviews are scheduled for Mid-March. The successful candidates are expected to start latest September 2013. For the online application process visit the link above. Posted: 11/16/12.

University of Konstanz: The Yohannes lab, member of the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology, is offering the fully-funded three-year PhD position: Isotopic finger-printing of contemporary and historic changes in copepod trophic position following a shift in lake trophy. The successful applicant will participate in the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology, the PhD program of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen and Radolfzell and the University of Konstanz. All IMPRS students are supported by stipends or contracts. The program offers a dedicated teaching program, high quality research experience, and outstanding research facilities in an inspiring research and living environment. The working language is English. Each PhD student receives individual supervision and mentoring and is guided in her/his research work by a PhD advisory committee. Qualification Applicants should hold a MSc or equivalent degree in biology or a related discipline at the point of enrollment. Queries should be mailed to the IMPRS program office: IMPRS@uni-konstanz.de Deadline for the application is January 15, 2013. Interviews are scheduled for Mid-March. The successful candidate is expected to start latest September 2013. For the online application process visit the link above. Posted: 11/16/12.

University of Konstanz: PhD Position in Plant Ecology, 'Testing the relative roles of competition and plant-soil feedbacks in explaining commonness and rarity of native and alien plant species.' This project will test the relative importance of competition and plant-soil feedbacks in explaining commonness and rarity of plant species native and alien to Germany, using novel experiments in greenhouse, common garden and field settings. This project is fully funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) for three years. The position is available to start in November 2012, and will be supervised by Wayne Dawson and Mark van Kleunen. The successful candidate should have a good ecological background, with at least a good Bachelor’s degree in ecology or related discipline. The candidate should also ideally have some experience of working with plants, and knowledge and experience of statistical analysis. Please send applications, including a letter of motivation, a CV and names and addresses of two referees, to Wayne Dawson (wayne.dawson@uni-konstanz.de). The deadline for applications is 30th September 2012. Posted: 8/24/12.

University of Leipzig: Doctoral fellowship on Plant Physiology/Biospectroscopy (initially limited to 3 years, 65 percent of a full-time employment). Salary: Entgeltgruppe 13 TV-L. Topic/job description: - development of measuring protocols for IR spectroscopy - development of mathematical algorigthms for spectral analysis (chemometrics) - biochemical quantification of selected components of material from different plants - integration of IR results into a theoretical background of species specific C-allocation pattern. Requirements / expected profile: - an excellent master's degree in a relevant field of research - experience in biochemical analysis of plant material - experience in in-vivo spectroscopy of plants - experience of multivariate statistical analyses - good use of spoken and written English and ambition to publish in international journals - creativity, enthusiasm and endurance. We offer you a PhD position, affiliated with the University of Leipzig and supervised by Prof. Christian Wilhelm, department of Plant Physiology, Institute of Biology. Applications are accepted until May 20, 2013. All applications should include: - filled application form - cover letter describing research interests & relevant experience - curriculum vitae - one letter of recommendation - MA/BA/Diploma certificates. Applications should be directed to the Young BioDiversity Research Training Group (yDiv) coordinator Dr. Jula Zimmermann (ydiv@idiv-biodiversity.de) in a single PDF file with reference file number (54/2013) in the subject line. We prefer applications in electronic form (hard copy applications can be sent to Dr. J. Zimmermann; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research - iDiv; Deutscher Platz 5e; 04103 Leipzig). Posted: 5/3/13.

University of Lethbridge: A Graduate Research Assistantship leading to an MSc degree in biology is available starting September 2013 in entomology. The successful candidate will be a member of the Department of Biology Sciences and will be supervised by Dr. Robert Laird. The project is to determine the cold and heat tolerance of the khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium), a quarantine insect that feeds on stored products. In addition to using established methods, the student will develop methods to examine the response of khapra beetle to extreme temperatures. The overarching goal of the project is to use extreme temperatures as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigations. The experiments will be carried out at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Lethbridge Research Centre, Containment Facility under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Floate, with guidance from Dr. Paul Fields. Qualifications: Candidates need to have completed an undergraduate degree in the life sciences. Ability to complete all admission requirements of the University of Lethbridge Graduate Studies is required. Stipend: Funding $17-27k (depending upon grants and including Graduate Teaching Assistantship of $7k/year). Deadline for Application: 1 April 2013. For additional information, please contact: Robert Laird, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4, Canada. (403) 317-5074, robert.laird at uleth.ca. Posted: 2/18/13.

University of Louisiana: Doctoral Fellowships and other assistantships available for entering Ph.D. students in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology. We will be awarding University of Louisiana Fellowships and Board of Regents Fellowships to Ph.D. students entering Spring and Fall 2013. UL Fellows are funded for 3-4 years and have limited teaching responsibilities, while BoR Fellows are funded for 4 years at and have no formal teaching duties. Stipends are up to $28k per year (with tuition waiver). Eligibility requirements include US citizenship (or permanent residency) or degree from a US institution. We will also have teaching and research assistantships available for incoming Ph.D. students. Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to directly contact prospective advisors. Their contact information and research interests can be found at the Department of Biology web site, which also has a link to our graduate programs. The Department has approximately 75 graduate students and 25 graduate faculty members conducting research on a wide variety of topics. Posted: 8/21/12.

University of Louisiana at Lafayette: Spring 2013. I (Scott M. Duke-Sylvester, Department of Biology) have support for a highly motivated PhD student who is interested in interdisciplinary research on wetland ecosystems and plant community dynamics. My research involves the mathematical and computational modeling of landscape scale processes. I have NSF funding to support a modeling effort to explore the contribution of plants and plant community structure to the formation and persistence of deltaic ecosystem. This research is part of a larger NSF funded project comprised of an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, hydrologist, and engineers to understand the processes that have allowed Wax Lake Delta to emerge as the only growing delta in the Louisiana coastal wetlands ecosystem. Wax Lake Delta is located along Louisiana's Guld Coast at the southern end of the Atchafalaya wetlands. Support for this position includes a stipend of $18k/year plus tuition waiver for four years. Support for additional years is available from the biology department in the form of teaching assistantships and state funded fellowships. Successful applicants should have a completed their undergraduate degree, have a background in the biological sciences, experience with at least one programming language such as C, R, Java or Python and an interest in developing computational models for plant communities. Interested candidates may contact me at smd3729@louisiana.edu. Posted: 9/14/12.

University of Maine: Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistantship, Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine, Orono. Project: Test the accuracy and effectiveness of various sampling designs and methodologies to estimate population status and trend in American marten (Martes americana). The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife will use this project’s findings to develop a long-term monitoring program for marten. The student will have flexibility in identifying specific research questions and hypotheses, but it is expected that he/she will interact with other projects in our research group to explore and test key concepts in community ecology as they relate to forest management. Qualifications: Master’s degree in the biological sciences or a closely related field, relevant research experience and proven field skills, strong quantitative capabilities, and excellent written and oral communication abilities. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.2, graduate GPA of 3.5, and GRE of 1200 are desired. Applicants with an expressed desire to be part of a collaborative research team, and who have an intellectual interest in linking population processes to community-level dynamics are especially encouraged to apply. Compensation: Salary $20k per year with opportunity for annual increases, a full tuition waiver, and one half of annual student health insurance costs. Funding is renewed annually for 4.5 years. Dates: Position to begin fall semester 2013. Review of applications will begin 27 March and continue until filled. To apply: Send a letter of application, CV, copies of transcripts, GRE scores, and contact information for three references to Shawn McKinney via email (shawn.mckinney@maine.edu), and write “application to PhD position” in the subject line. Posted: 3/14/13.

University of Maine: M.S. Graduate Research Assistantship, Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine, Orono. Project: Investigate relationships among forest stand structure, tree species composition, seed production, and the small-to-medium-sized mammal community in Maine. The student will have flexibility in identifying specific research questions and hypotheses, but it is expected that he/she will interact with other projects in our research group to explore and test key concepts in community ecology as they relate to forest management. Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in the biological sciences or a closely related discipline, research experience (field and/or lab), demonstrated quantitative skills, and excellent written and oral communication abilities. A minimum GPA of 3.2 and GRE of 1200 are desired. Applicants with an expressed desire to be part of a collaborative research team, and who have an intellectual interest in linking population processes to community-level dynamics are especially encouraged to apply. Compensation: Salary $19k per year with opportunity for annual increases, a full tuition waiver, and one half of annual student health insurance costs. Funding is renewed annually for 2.5 years. Dates: Position to begin fall semester 2013. Review of applications will begin 27 March and continue until filled. To apply: Send a letter of application, CV, copies of transcripts, GRE scores, and contact information for three references to Shawn McKinney via email (shawn.mckinney@maine.edu), and write “application to MS position” in the subject line. Posted: 3/14/13.

University of Maine: I am seeking a highly motivated graduate student to join my new lab in Orono this fall. I'm a newly appointed Assistant Professor of Paleoecology and Plant Ecology with the School of Biology and Ecology and the Climate Change Institute. As a paleoecologist and biogeographer, I use the tools of space and time to understand questions of conservation relevance. You can read more about me and my research at my website (Jacquelyn Gill). In my lab, I use a combination of lake sediment proxy analyses (e.g. pollen, charcoal), modern experiments, and modeling (including dynamic vegetation models and species distribution modeling). Possible projects include: 1) Testing whether modern North American plant species are dispersal-limited in the absence of extinct herbivores (e.g. mammoths, passenger pigeons). 2) Using plant traits to asses changes in ecosystem function over the last 18,000 years. 3) Testing the effects of tree species gains and losses on New England forest ecosystem function using sediment records. 4) Identifying signatures of Native American land use (including fire) in pre-European New England forests. 5) Using the paleorecord to understand tipping points and other responses to abrupt climate change, particularly in forest-grassland transitions. 6) Assessing the relative effects of bison herbivory and climate change on prairie vegetation during the Holocene. I'm also open to discussing other opportunities with the right student, so if you have a particular project you'd like to pitch that you think would be a good fit, feel free to contact me. The ideal candidate should have field and/or lab experience (not necessarily paleo-related, though the student should be interested in paleoecology), a demonstrated ability to work independently (such as a senior thesis or post-baccalaureate work), and strengths in communication, quantitive skills, or both. I currently have two years of a Teaching Assistantship to fund a graduate student, ideally at the Masters level (though this is flexible). This funding comes with a stipend, tuition remission, and benefits. If you're interested, please send a CV attached to a message briefly expressing your background, career, and research interests to jacquelynlgill@gmail.com. See also: Graduate Program in Ecology and Environmental Science. Posted: 12/5/12, revised: 4/3/13.

University of Maine: Two Graduate Research Assistantships will be available in 2012 in the area of forest soils and ecosystem biogeochemistry in the laboratory of Ivan Fernandez. We are seeking highly motivated students interested in developing their research within the context of a larger multi-disciplinary team. Students seeking a Ph.D. or highly qualified M.S. students may apply. Applicants with research experience in forest soils, ecology, environmental science or biogeochemistry are preferred. The assistantship includes a competitive stipend, tuition, and health insurance. There are several degree program major options available to the students, depending on their background and professional interests, such as Forest Resources or Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Both positions will include rigorous field research as well as detailed laboratory studies. One position will focus on the use of biochar as a soil amendment to develop an advanced biofuel pathway for New England. The research will be conducted as part of a multidisciplinary research project, and approaches for the use of biochar will include both mesocosm and field experiments. The second position will focus on the biogeochemistry of soil response to long-term whole-watershed acidification, nitrogen enrichment, and recovery. Specific emphasis will be on sulfate and base cation response mechanisms in soils. This project also is part of a larger, long-term, multi-disciplinary, and collaborative research team. Other opportunities are also possible in the overall program in 2013. Interested applicants are encouraged to send a letter of interest (prior accomplishments, research experience and interests, future career goals), a CV, transcripts, and GRE scores. Details about the graduate admissions process: http://www.umaine.edu/graduate/. Please contact: Dr. Ivan J. Fernandez, University of Maine, School of Forest Resources and Climate Change Institute, 5722 Deering Hall – Room 1, Orono, ME 04469-5722. 207-581-2932. E-mail: ivanjf@maine.edu. Posted: 11/5/12.

University of Maine: IGERT: Adaptation to Abrupt Climate Change (A2C2). Seeking outstanding applicants for a doctoral graduate training program in adaptation to abrupt climate change funded by the NSF IGERT program. This is a joint program between the Climate Change Institute and the School of Policy & International Affairs at UMaine. The A2C2 IGERT is designed to train doctoral students in earth sciences, ecology, anthropology, archaeology, international affairs, and economics to meet critical societal needs in human adaptation to ACC. Please see the program website for descriptions of program goals and research themes. Students in this program will receive an annual stipend of $30k per year in each of the first 2 years, plus tuition, fees, and health insurance coverage. Students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents to receive IGERT support. Application instructions are provided on the program website. For full consideration, submit all documents no later than February 1 for the following academic year. Any questions about this program should be sent to the IGERT A2C2 Project Director, Dr. Jasmine Saros, jasmine.saros@umit.maine.edu. Posted: 10/19/12.

University of Mainz: The Faculty 10 Biology, Institute of Zoology, Dept. Evolutionary Biology is searching for a PhD Student (3 years – 65% TVL E13) in the research area “Parasite manipulation of host behavior”. Application is possible until position is filled, for full consideration, apply by 30th of April 2013. We invite applications for a 3-years PhD position at the JG University of Mainz, Germany. The project aims at a better understanding of the consequences of cestode infection on multiple levels in the ant species Temnothorax nylanderi. It is based on our previous findings showing severe effects of infection on the individual level, but no reduction in productivity and changed investment patterns on the colony level (Scharf et al., American Naturalist 2012, see also this review in Science). In the current project we will study how insect societies can buffer detrimental effects of parasite infection. In addition, we are interested in which of the parasite-induced changes in behavior, morphology, and cuticular chemistry are by-products of the infection, can be interpreted as host defenses or manipulation of the host by the parasite. The project will include field manipulations, behavioral laboratory experiments and chemical analyses using GC-MS. The position requires a Diploma or Master degree in Biology (or a related field). The successful candidate should be highly motivated and have a strong background in behavioral / chemical ecology and evolutionary biology. Good skills in biostatistics or motivation to improve statistical knowledge are important. Previous research experiences with social insects, parasites, behavioral experiments, chemical ecology (GC-MS analyses), immunity or microsatellite analyses are advantageous, but not required. The position is fully-funded by the DFG (65% TV-L E13). Students from every nationality are encouraged to apply. The working language of the laboratory is English. Our young group offers an international, dynamic and interactive scientific environment and state-of the art, newly equipped laboratories. Information on our scientific work including recent publications. For more information, please do not hesitate to contact us foitzik@uni-mainz.de. or menzelf@uni-mainz.de. The University of Mainz hosts many excellent scientific institutions and Mainz is a historic city located on the River Rhine with many students and a rich social and cultural life. Interested candidates should send an application as a single pdf e-mail attachment) containing a brief explanation of their research experience and interests (max. 1 page), a curriculum vitae (with the grades of their B.Sc and M.Sc), a copy of their Master or Diploma thesis, and the names and email address of 2-3 potential referees to Dr. Susanne Foitzik (foitzik@uni-mainz.de) or Dr. Florian Menzel (menzelf@uni-mainz.de). Review of applications will begin April 30th 2013 and will continue until the position is filled. The ideal starting date for the position is June 2013, but is negotiable. Prof. Dr. Susanne Foitzik, Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Zoology, Johannes-v.- Müller-Weg 6, 55128 Mainz. Posted: 4/17/13.

University of Manchester: 4-year PhD studentship - part of a multi-disciplinary project bringing together the fields of ecology, evolution, computer science and control theory. Title: The evolution of sexual imprinting behaviour. Anticipated start date: September of 2013. Closing date for applications: December 7th, 2012. Description: Why do individuals choose the mates they choose? In many species, including humans, mate choice depends in part on sexual imprinting. Sexual imprinting is a process by which individuals learn preferences for mates with certain phenotypes by observing other members of their populations. Different populations, and different sexes within populations, exhibit different sexual imprinting strategies. Sexual imprinting is an important component of animal behaviour, and it helps to shape how phenotypes evolve and if and when speciation occurs. However, how sexual imprinting itself evolves, and why strategies differ between populations and sexes, remains poorly understood. The goal of this project is to develop a synthetic theory for the evolution of sexual imprinting. With guidance from Drs. Tucker Gilman and Eva Navarro-López at the University of Manchester, the student who undertakes this project will develop analytical models and agent-based computational simulations to understand when sexual imprinting should evolve and what imprinting strategies we should expect to see in nature. Research will consider how evolved imprinting strategies can affect trait evolution in environments in which selective pressures are heterogeneous in space and time. In the third year of the studentship, the student will spend six months in the lab of Prof. Erik Svensson at Lund University, where he or she will gain experience with experimental approaches to the study of sexual imprinting, as well as professional experience working with international collaborators. Training will include classical methods in biology (e.g., population genetics, adaptive dynamics) and hybrid systems modelling - a nascent area of research that merges computer science, control engineering and dynamical systems analysis. The student will gain empirical experience and professional experience with international collaborators in the lab of Erik Svensson. Candidates should: - be interested in using mathematical models to understand evolutionary processes; - have a background in biology, or a willingness to acquire such a background; - have a sound mathematical background; - have good verbal and written communication skills, good interpersonal skills, and a collaborative attitude. The ideal candidate will also: - have experience with dynamical systems analysis; - have experience with mathematical models, and with mathematical and computational tools required to carry out the project; - have experience in programming; Applicants with multi-disciplinary backgrounds are especially welcome. The studentship provides tuition fees and a stipend (£13,590 per year, tax free) to cover living expenses for 4 years for eligible UK students. Students from the EU but outside the UK are eligible for tuition and fees, but a stipend cannot be guaranteed to non-UK students. A small amount of travel funding is attached to the studentship. Students from outside the EU will be considered, but must have their own funding source. Contact for further information: Dr. Tucker Gilman (tucker.gilman@manchester.ac.uk ), Dr. Eva Navarro-López (eva.navarro@cs.man.ac.uk ), Prof. Erik Svensson (Erik.Svensson@biol.lu.se ) Potential applicants should send an email message to Tucker Gilman (tucker.gilman@manchester.ac.uk ), including - A cover letter - A curriculum vitae - A brief description of the applicant’s background - A brief description of current work or interests - Some representative work (if available). Posted: 10/30/12.

University of Manitoba: I am currently seeking two motivated graduate students to study the interaction between herbivores and natural enemies in agricultural landscapes. I am recruiting candidates for the following positions: 1 - Soybean aphid control by natural enemies in Manitoba: The candidate will study for the first time the natural enemies of soybean aphids in Manitoba, establish their sources in the agricultural landscape and their potential for dispersion across different habitats (M.Sc. level). 2 - Landscape scale role of multiple predator assemblages and bottom-up controls: The candidate will compare the relative strength of top-down and bottom-up control in agricultural landscapes that vary in structural and functional components (Ph. D. level). Candidates must hold a B.Sc. or M. Sc. degree in entomology, ecology, agroecology, biology or related field. Applicants should have a keen interest in insect ecology, trophic interactions, and landscape ecology. Excellent work ethic and proficiency in English language (written and oral) are required. Knowledge of GIS techniques and familiarity with quantitative techniques in ecology are assets. While these two positions are fully funded (2 years for M.Sc., 3 years for Ph. D.), the successful applicants will be encouraged to apply for additional funding from the University Fellowship program and provincial and federal funding agencies when applicable. Anticipated start date is January 2013 or as soon as possible after that date. For more information contact Ale Costamagna. For full consideration please send your applications before October 1st, the positions will remain open until suitable candidates are found. Please include in your application: 1) Name of the position to which you are applying, 2) Letter of application describing career goals and research interests, 3) Resume, transcripts (unofficial at this stage), and 4) Names, addresses, phone numbers and email addresses of three references. Applications should be sent to: Alejandro C. Costamagna Ale_Costamagna@umanitoba.ca phone: 1-204-474-9007 fax: 1-204-474-7628. Posted: 9/20/12.

University of Maryland: PhD Assistantship: Spatial modeling and remote sensing of intraspecific variation in phenology under changing climate. Seeking a motivated PhD student interested in studying spatial variation in forest tree phenology and its relationship to underlying genomic variation and environmental gradients. The student would join a team of biogeographers, remote-sensing scientists, and population geneticists to develop novel statistical methods to model and map intraspecific variation at regional to continental scales. An emphasis of the position is on developing approaches to identify the geographic location of populations pre/mal-adapted to future climate change. Within this framework, there are numerous opportunities for a student to extend the broader project objectives to include any number of ideas the student is most interested in pursuing. This is an ideal project for an individual with excellent quantitative and computer programming skills (e.g., R, python, etc.) and with an interest in working at the interface of biogeographical modeling, remote sensing, and landscape genomics, while developing the following skills: - statistical modeling generally and spatial modeling of biodiversity in particular - remote sensing of phenology - spatial analysis, including GIS - macroscale ecology and global change. The project is based at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg, Maryland, with Matt Fitzpatrick, Andrew Elmore, and Stephen Keller. Student support has been secured through a grant from the National Science Foundation. The student will matriculate through the Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Sciences Program (MEES) at the University of Maryland, College Park and will reside at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg for the duration of the project. To apply, please email as a single pdf document: (1) a statement of interest, (2) a CV, and (3) contact information for three referees to mfitzpatrick@umces.edu. Review of applications will begin on February 18th, 2013, with a start date of Fall semester 2013. This ad is also posted at http://www.umces.edu/al/employment. Posted: 1/10/13.

University of Maryland: Graduate Research Position in Margaret Palmer's lab. I have an opening for a M.S. or Ph.D. student in my research group in the area of wetland-stream connectivity. Position is available now but could also be filled in January. Student must have GIS skills and course work in ecosystem science or ecology. If interested, please send resume, transcripts, and GRE scores to Margaret A. Palmer (mpalmer@umd.edu), Director, National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center. Posted: 8/2/12.

University of Maryland: Fellowship in global ecology and carbon dynamics. This position includes development of a spatially-resolved carbon flux data product for global agricultural lands. Research will include reviewing and developing carbon parameters, work with large numerical databases, development of carbon budgets, and spatial downscaling with remote sensing data. Preferred technical skills include database management with “R”, ArcGIS, and meta-analysis. The successful applicant will work with a team that has many of the aforementioned skills, so technical expertise with all skills is not essential. Ability to communicate clearly, both oral and written, are critical. Applicant should have an interest in regional and global carbon dynamics associated with land-use change. The position is located at the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) at College Park, MD. The project is led by the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) at College Park, Maryland. JGCRI is a joint institute that combines expertise from the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland. The researcher will also interface with colleagues at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Project results will be used in the NASA Carbon Flux Pilot Study and in the Department of Energy’s Integrated Assessment Program. Project duration is 1 year with the potential for longer-term extension. This position is open to post-doctoral and post-masters researchers. Please send resume to Dr. Tris West, (Email: Tristram.west@pnnl.gov; Phone: 301-314-6705). Posted: 7/18/12.

University of Maryland: Requesting applications for a PhD student to participate in an interdisciplinary project entitled "Sustainable Community Oriented Stormwater Management (S-COSM): A Sensible Strategy for the Chesapeake Bay" sponsored by the EPA-STAR program. Outstanding M.S. candidates may also be considered. Research will focus on identifying water pollution in spatially variable urban environments and the development of a diagnostic decision support system to better prescribe effective management. Work will involve using process-based biodynamic hydrologic models to evaluate responses of urban areas to environmental stressors, but also integrate social, economic, and human health data collected by other project participants into the decision support system. The successful applicant will need a desire to consider their specific research within the broader framework of social and environmental sustainability, and clearly demonstrate interdisciplinary skills. The student will be based in the Department of Environmental Science and Technology, but work closely with Co-PIs in Departments of Bioengineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Plant Sciences and Landscape Architecture, and the School of Public Health. Applicants will also work closely with community partners given a strong community-based participatory research component to this project. Applicants must have a M.S. in hydrology, engineering, computer modeling or relevant field. Requirements also include: a) demonstrated experience using SWAT and SUSTAIN tools of the EPA BASINS framework; b) demonstrated superior written (e.g., publications) and oral (e.g., presentations) communication skills; and c) demonstrated ability to be a committed team player. A start date of Spring, 2013 is the target. To apply, please send the following to the email address below: (1) Curriculum Vitae, (2) statement of research interests (1 pg), and (3) names and contact information of two references familiar with your research abilities. These application materials should be sent and addressed to Dr. Paul Leisnham (Leisnham@umd.edu) in the Dept. of Environmental Science and Technology, University of Maryland. Paul Leisnham is attending the upcoming ESA meeting in Portland and may be able to meet with potential applicants about the project. Posted: 7/13/12.

University of Maryland: Requesting applications for a PhD student to participate in an interdisciplinary project entitled "Urban disamenities and pests: Coupled dynamics of urban mosquito ecology and human systems across socio-economically diverse communities" funded through a NSF Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH) grant. Outstanding M.S. candidates may also be considered. Research will investigate ecological factors regulating communities of disease-vector and pest mosquitoes in Baltimore, MD using surveys, experimental manipulations, and modeling. Ecological data and findings will be integrated with data collected on upstream social factors and human health. The student will be based in the Ecology and Health Lab at the University of Maryland under the supervision of Dr. Paul Leisnham, but work closely with four other PIs with expertise in ecology, social sciences, and public health from UMD and other institutions. Research will also involve close collaboration with partners within urban communities, postdocs, and other graduate students. Applicants must have a M.S. in biology, ecology, or relevant field. Requirements also include: a) familiarity with aquatic insect communities, urban ecosystems, and/or integrated pest management; b) knowledge of experimental methods in ecology; c) strong background in experimental design and statistical techniques, and experience with SAS or R; d) demonstrated superior written (e.g., publications) and oral (e.g., presentations) communication skills; and e) demonstrated ability to be a committed team player. A start date of Spring, 2013 is the target. To apply, please send the following to the email address below: (1) Curriculum Vitae, (2) statement of research interests (1 pg), and (3) names and contact information of two references familiar with your research abilities. These application materials should be sent and addressed to Dr. Paul Leisnham (leisnham@umd.edu) in the Dept. of Environmental Science and Technology, University of Maryland. Paul Leisnham will be attending the upcoming ESA meeting in Portland and may be able to talk to interested applicants about the project. Posted: 7/13/12.

University of Maryland: The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science seeks a motivated PhD student to study the influence of changes in growing season length on the productivity of forest trees in the eastern United States. The student will join a team of ecologists and remote-sensing scientists to integrate multi-scale remotely sensed imagery of forest phenology and structure with tree-ring width and isotopic measurements. An important component of the student’s work will involve interfacing with resource managers to ensure that project outcomes benefit the management of protected ecosystems in the eastern US. The project is based at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg, Maryland, with Drs. Andrew Elmore and David Nelson. The student will have access to the lab’s excellent research, computing, and teaching facilities, including a state-of-the-art stable isotope lab. Student support has been secured through a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The student will matriculate through the Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Sciences Program (MEES) at the University of Maryland, College Park. To apply, please e-mail a single PDF document that includes: (1) a statement of interest, (2) a CV (including GPA and GRE scores), and (3) contact information for three references to aelmore@umces.edu. The full ad is available at http://www.umces.edu/al/employment, and it will be posted until the position is filled. Posted: 7/6/12, revised: 8/2/12.

University of Maryland, Baltimore County: We seek a motivated, independent PhD student to conduct NSF supported research on the interacting effects of density dependence and climate on non-breeding Neotropical migrant birds in Jamaica. The student will be co-advised by Drs. Colin Studds and Peter Marra and will be enrolled at University of Maryland Baltimore County. Competitive applicants will possess an M.S degree in ecology or related field, have strong quantitative skills, and substantial ornithological field experience. Experience netting, banding and re-sighting small, color-marked birds is particularly desirable. Applicants should send a cover letter, CV, and contact information for three references to jamaica.student@gmail.com. The student will conduct initial fieldwork from 15 Jan – 15 May 2014 and will begin course work in Fall 2014. Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Maryland, Baltimore County: The Department of Geography and Environmental Systems (GES) is inviting applications for the PhD and MS program, to begin enrollment in Fall 2013. The Department is comprised of a multi-disciplinary group of faculty with an emphasis on examining the dynamic relationship between social and natural processes. Our Department recognizes that human-environment relationships encompass a wide range of political, cultural, chemical, biological, economic, and atmospheric phenomena, and we are committed to integrative research and graduate training that reflects the complexity of contemporary environmental issues. Our faculty currently have active research and teaching agendas related to all of these areas. We utilize a broad range of methodological techniques that include field and laboratory studies, modeling, GIS and remote sensing, spatial statistics, historical research, ethnography, interviews, and document analysis. Our research seeks to contribute to cutting edge debates across the natural and social sciences, as well as inform policy through our empirical findings. Our program of graduate study is designed to train graduate students who are able to accomplish these same goals. The Department offers graduate programs leading to the M.S and/or Ph.D degree. Both non-thesis and thesis M.S. options are available. The application deadline for Fall 2013 admission to our graduate program is February 1, 2013. Apply online. Detailed information can be found on the GES website: http://ges.umbc.edu/graduate/. Posted: 12/3/12.

University of Massachusetts: PhD Research Assistantship: Residential Outdoor Water Conservation. Preferred start date: January 2013 (later date negotiable). A position is available for a Ph.D. student to assist with research that will examine the influence of policy and outreach efforts on local residents' adoption of water conservation and stormwater strategies in the residential landscapes of the Ipswich and Parker River watershed north of Boston. The Ipswich is considered one of the most threatened rivers in the US, due to polluted stormwater runoff and overdraft of water by local communities. Other comparison communities may be included in the study. Through this research, we seek to trace watershed conservation measures from policy incentives to impact so as to develop a clearer picture of the relationship between local policy and outreach efforts, actual decisions to engage and install residential landscape water conservation practices, and measureable improvements in water conservation and ecosystem health. The objective is to develop improved understandings of institutional and behavioral impacts on water conservation. The successful candidate should have a master’s degree in landscape architecture, hydrology, ecology, environmental science, regional planning or a related discipline. Master’s students in their last year of study (or with considerable experience in the field) who plan to continue on for a Ph.D. will be considered. Direct knowledge and experience in water supply or utility functioning, water efficiency, low-impact development strategies, policy, and economics is highly desirable. S/he will also be familiar with a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods including conducting and analyzing interviews and surveys, database management, and GIS. Good communication and presentation skills are essential. A valid driver’s license is also needed. The candidate can seek to obtain a degree through either the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning or the Department of Environmental Conservation. Funding available includes 2-year’s stipend and graduate school tuition/fees, with additional funding possible. To apply or request further information, email a cover letter and CV (or resume) to Robert Ryan (rlryan@larp.umass.edu), Anita Milman ( amilman@eco.umass.edu), and Allison Roy (aroy@eco.umass.edu). Application to and acceptance via the Graduate School is required. Posted: 10/23/12.

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth: A position is available for a Master’s student to work on an NSF-funded project applying molecular genetics techniques to address questions in plant ecology. The successful applicant will conduct greenhouse experiments to test how root foraging precision responds to interspecific competition, and will employ molecular markers to determine relative abundance of species in root samples. The student will be jointly supervised by Dr. Tara Rajaniemi (plant ecology) and Dr. Robert Drew (genomics). Candidates must have a bachelor’s degree in biology or related field, with high GPA in relevant courses. Research experience is a plus. The position will start June 1, 2013. Interested students should send a cover letter describing research interests and a CV to Dr. Rajaniemi (trajaniemi@umassd.edu), and must apply to the master’s program in biology. For information about the graduate program at UMass Dartmouth, including application information, visit http://www1.umassd.edu/cas/biology/grad/. The deadline to apply is February 15. Posted: 1/24/13.

University of Minnesota: The Department of Forest Resources is seeking a master's-level graduate student to participate in a research project examining the effects of variable retention harvests on ground-layer plant communities in red pine forests within northern Minnesota. The student will join a team of collaborators from the University of Minnesota and U.S. Forest Service to assess the influence of different levels of overstory retention and understory shrub competition on ground-layer flora within a large-scale, long-term silviculture experiment. The position is available for Spring/Summer 2013 and includes two years of funding (stipend, tuition waiver, and health insurance). The ideal candidate will have a B.S. in forest ecology, forestry, natural resources conservation, environmental science, biology or a closely related field, as well as a strong work ethic, demonstrated quantitative capabilities, a record of leadership, and a proven ability to work independently. The application deadline for this position is December 15, 2012. Interested candidates should contact: Dr. Anthony D'Amato (damato@umn.edu, 612-625-3733). Posted: 9/6/12.

University of Mississippi: The Hoeksema lab is seeking a graduate student to participate in an NSF-funded project investigating variation in resource-exchange interactions between pines and their ectomycorrhizal fungi, and the consequences of this variation for community dynamics. More information on the project and other ongoing research in the Hoeksema lab. The target start date for the position is August, 2013, although an earlier or later start date may be negotiable. The position will provide a minimum of three semesters of stipend support through a research assistantship (RA), with further guaranteed support through teaching assistantships. Tuition and health insurance benefits are also provided. The Department of Biology has a thriving graduate program, with significant faculty strengths in ecology, evolution, and behavior. For more information, please contact Dr. Jason Hoeksema (hoeksema@olemiss.edu, 662.915.1275). Posted: 10/22/12.

University of Mississippi: M.S. Fellowship in Soil Microbial & Forest Restoration Ecology A fellowship is available for a student to pursue a Master of Science degree studying soil microbial ecology in the context of forest restoration and management through the Department of Biology. The participating student would join a cohort of three other graduate students with different organismal foci, all of whom will participate in a comprehensive graduate training program in forest restoration ecology. Participating students will have several unique and exciting opportunities, including a summer internship with a successful forest restoration project in British Columbia, Canada; participation in collaborative research on forest restoration and fire ecology in northern Mississippi; coursework in forest restoration ecology, research methods, and professional development; and supported travel to meetings. The M.S. fellow would join the research laboratory of Dr. Colin Jackson, but might also find opportunities for collaborative research with Drs. Steve Brewer, Jason Hoeksema, and Brice Noonan. The fellow will receive stipend support of $17k for 2 years, health insurance, and a waiver of graduate tuition through a United States Department of Agriculture graduate training fellowship, and additional support in the form of a teaching assistantship will be available if necessary. Fellowships are only available to U.S. citizens and nationals. The University of Mississippi is located in Oxford, a small college town in the forested uplands of northern Mississippi known for its outstanding educational and cultural opportunities. Starting date is negotiable, between January and August 2013. For more information contact Dr. Colin Jackson (cjackson@olemiss.edu) and for instructions on how to apply please see www.olemiss.edu/depts/biology/usda. Applications should be submitted as soon as possible, and will be accepted until February 1, 2013 or until the position is filled. Posted: 8/7/12.

University of Missouri: In collaboration with Lincoln University in Missouri, we are seeking a Ph.D. graduate research assistant (GRA) to conduct independent research investigating urban forest carbon sequestration in a dynamic multi-land-use urbanizing watershed of the central U.S. The study is part of a large ongoing project in the Hinkson Creek experimental watershed encompassing the city of Columbia and the University of Missouri. Even though urban areas are a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere, urban vegetation and soils are capable of sequestering substantial quantities of carbon. The successful applicant will study carbon storage and flux above and below ground as a function of urban tree canopy density in sites along an urbanization gradient. This urbanization gradient aims at spanning the maximal range of forest stand and canopy density and soil conditions in order to identify urban forest types that maximize C sequestration. Study sites include heavily (downtown) to moderately (residential area and city park) to minimally (bottomland hardwood forest) urbanized areas of Columbia, including a site recently converted from agricultural use to biomass (willow/cottonwood) production. A hardwood forest reference site outside the city limit is located 25 km south of Columbia. Carbon storage will be quantified by sampling and analyzing mass and C concentrations of major C pools. C fluxes will be quantified by measuring photosynthetic and respiration rates of vegetation and soil respiration. This is a four year position beginning immediately or when filled. Applicants must possess a master’s degree and have completed at least one degree in biology, environmental sciences, forest ecology, or a related field. Experience in carbon biogeochemical cycling and measurement of carbon pools and fluxes (C/N elemental analyzer, IRGA) is a plus. Strong verbal, written, and computational skills are mandatory. Successful applicants will be required to work collaboratively and independently, conduct field work under variable weather conditions, and aid in installation and maintenance of instruments and monitoring sites. Applicants must possess a valid US driver's license and be able to lift and carry equipment and tools. When applying, please forward by email the following documents: transcript, curriculum vitae, recent GRE scores, recent TOEFL scores (international students only), cover letter (including academic, research and professional goals and interests), and the names and contact information of three references to: Dr. Jason Hubbart, Department of Forestry, University of Missouri, 203-Q ABNR Bldg, Columbia, MO 65211, USA; Tel No. (573) 884-7732; Fax: (573) 882-1979; Email: HubbartJ@Missouri.edu. Posted: 2/14/13, revised: 4/4/13.

University of Missouri: Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistant Position: Urban Forest Carbon Sequestration. The Interdisciplinary Hydrology Laboratory in the School of Natural Resources, in collaboration with Lincoln University, is seeking a Ph.D. graduate research assistant (GRA) to conduct independent research investigating urban forest carbon (C) sequestration in a dynamic multi-land-use urbanizing watershed of the central U.S. The study takes advantage of a nested-scale experimental watershed study design in the Hinkson Creek Watershed (HCW) encompassing the city of Columbia and the University of Missouri. This is a four year position beginning when filled. The successful applicant will study carbon storage and flux above and below ground as a function of urban tree canopy density in sites along an urbanization gradient. Applicants must possess a master’s degree and have completed at least one degree in forest ecology, environmental sciences, physical hydrology, biogeochemistry, or a similar natural resources related field. Experience in carbon biogeochemical cycling and measurement in carbon pools and fluxes is a plus. Strong verbal, written, and computational skills are mandatory. Successful applicants will be required to work collaboratively and independently, conduct field work under variable weather conditions, and aid in installation and maintenance of instruments and monitoring sites. Applicants must possess a valid US driver's license and be able to lift and carry equipment and tools. For more information and if interested in applying, please contact Dr. Jason Hubbart. When applying, please forward by email the following documents: transcript, curriculum vitae, recent GRE scores, recent TOEFL scores (international students only), cover letter (including academic, research and professional goals and interests), and the names and contact information of three references to: Dr. Jason Hubbart, Department of Forestry, University of Missouri, 203-Q ABNR Bldg, Columbia, MO 65211, USA; Tel No. (573) 884-7732; Fax: (573) 882-1979; Email: HubbartJ@Missouri.edu. Posted: 1/22/13.

University of Missouri: Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistant: Investigating Carbon and Climate Mitigation by Urban Forests. The Interdisciplinary Hydrology Laboratory of the University of Missouri, in collaboration with Lincoln University, is seeking a Ph.D. graduate research assistant (GRA) to conduct independent research investigating urban forest carbon (C) sequestration and climate mitigation in a dynamic multi-land-use urbanizing watershed of the central U.S. The study takes place in the Hinkson Creek Watershed (HCW) encompassing the city of Columbia and the University of Missouri. The Interdisciplinary Hydrology Laboratory is located in the School of Natural Resources of the University of Missouri. The University of Missouri is among the top ten of the nation's universities with demonstrated excellence in teaching and research. This is a four year position beginning when filled. The successful applicant will study total C storage and flux above and below ground in at least six forested sites along an urbanization gradient and localized microclimate and energy flux variability influenced by the presence, absence, and density of urban tree canopies. Applicants must possess a master’s degree and have completed at least one degree in physical hydrology, biogeochemistry, ecology, environmental sciences, water quality, or a similar natural resources related field. Experience in C biogeochemical cycling and measurement in C pools and fluxes is a plus. Strong verbal, written, and computational skills are mandatory. Successful applicants will be required to work collaboratively and independently, conduct field work under variable weather conditions, and aid in installation and maintenance of instruments and monitoring sites. Applicants must possess a valid US driver's license and be able to lift and carry equipment and tools. If interested in applying, please forward by email the following documents: transcript, curriculum vitae, recent GRE scores, recent TOEFL scores (international students only), cover letter (including academic, research and professional goals and interests), and the names and contact information of three references to: Dr. Jason Hubbart, Department of Forestry, University of Missouri, 203-Q ABNR Bldg, Columbia, MO 65211, USA; Tel No. (573) 884-7732; Fax: (573) 882-1979; Email: HubbartJ@Missouri.edu. Posted: 10/23/12.

University of Missouri: PhD Position: Genetic Assessment of Amphibian Source-Sink Dynamics. The focus of this research project is on assessing the population and landscape genetics of ringed and spotted salamanders as they relate to source-sink dynamics at Fort Leonard Wood, MO. To date, we have developed and optimized site-specific microsatellites for each species. Research responsibilities will include training and oversight of undergraduates in the lab, DNA extraction, PCR, analysis of microsatellite data, and spatial of analysis of results using GIS. Fort Leonard Wood is a 25,000 hectare military training facility with >400 constructed wetlands that are inhabited by >12 amphibian species. This research is part of an ongoing project funded by SERDP, which involves intensive yearly ecological sampling of a 7,000 hectare area containing ~193 ponds for species abundance of egg, larval, and metamorph stages of both salamanders. Qualifications: Applicants should have 3.5 GPA and competitive GRE scores, with emphasis being placed on the quantitative reasoning section. Students should have strong writing and analytical skills, and experience with one or all of the following: GIS, statistical modeling, and population genetics. The selected student must be able to start no later than August 2013. This position provides a stipend of $24k/year plus tuition waiver and health insurance. Students will be guaranteed funding for 5 years on a TA, with the opportunity for RA support. Please send a CV, copy of transcripts, GRE scores, and publications to Ray Semlitsch at SemlitschR@missouri.edu. Posted: 9/6/12.

University of Montana: A PhD Graduate Research Assistantship is available in the Department of Ecosystem & Conservation Sciences focusing on the carbon (C) vulnerability and bioenergy potential of beetle kill wood in forests of Western North America. Bark beetle outbreaks have devastated forest resources across western North America leaving massive amounts of C in the biomass of standing dead trees. We are seeking a creative and curious PhD student to assess how much C has accumulated in standing dead biomass of North American forests, the vulnerability of this C to re-entering the atmosphere as CO2, and the potential for using this biomass to produce energy. The prospective student will collaborate with scientists from the University of Montana, Missoula, MT and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO. Formal appointments will begin in the fall of 2013, but preference will be given to candidates who can begin research in the summer of 2013. For more information please contact Ashley Ballantyne (ashley.ballantyne@umontana.edu). To apply, please send: 1) a letter, including scientific interests, professional goals and prior research experience; 2) a current resume or CV; and 3) contact information of three potential references. Applications received by April 30, 2013 will be given preference. Posted: 3/4/13.

University of Montana: A PhD Graduate Research Assistantship is available to study topographic influences on forest productivity in the Northwest US. The PhD position will be located at the University of Montana but the candidate will work with a multidisciplinary team consisting of personnel at the University of Montana, the US Forest Service and the University of Idaho. The overall goal of the project will be to link very fine-scale (<100m) air temperature and humidity and snowmelt models with physical snow and soil moisture models to improve our understanding of how terrain influences tree growth and productivity. Primary responsibilities for this position include collection of field and climatic data and linking those data with empirical, physical and simulation models of forest growth and yield. There is flexibility in selection of research questions depending on the interest and experience of the candidate. Desired qualifications include a M.S. in ecology, natural resources management or geography with strong skills in geospatial data analysis preferred. Experience with remote sensing or ecosystem modeling is also desirable. The 3-year position will be based in the College of Forestry at the University of Montana and includes a stipend and tuition waiver. The position is available in fall of 2013 or spring of 2014. Submit letter of interest, C.V., and names and contact information for 3 references to: David Affleck, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, david.affleck@umontana.edu. Posted: 2/27/13.

University of Montana: MS/PhD Opportunity in Ecosystem Biogeochemistry, Department of Ecosystem & Conservation Sciences. A graduate assistantship (M.S. or Ph.D) is now available to support a prospective student interested in studying the long-term effects of forest restoration treatments on ecosystem structure and function. Applicants should have a strong record of academic excellence, prior field and/or laboratory experience, and a demonstrated interest in microbial ecology, soils or ecosystems/biogeochemistry research. Student support will include a combination of teaching/research assistantships, a stipend (~$16k/year for MS students; $20k/year for PhD candidates) and a tuition waiver. Formal appointments will begin in the fall of 2013, but preference will be given to candidates who can begin field research in the spring of 2013. To apply: For more information or to apply, please email the following materials (as a single PDF or Word document) to Dr. Cory Cleveland at cory.cleveland@umontana.edu : 1) a current resume or CV, including GPA and test scores (if available); 2) a letter of interest, including research interests, professional goals and prior experience; and 3) contact information, including Email addresses, of three potential references. Applications received by December 31, 2012 will be given preference. Posted: 9/20/12.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: We are seeking a highly motivated PhD student to work on restoration ecology and invasive plant species in Great Plains grasslands using applied and theoretical approaches. The successful applicant will begin January 2013 and have the opportunity to work independently at established field research sites and with individuals in The Nature Conservancy, USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, and the School of Natural Resources at UNL. For more information or to submit an application, please reply to this message. If applying, send me a cover letter, CV, and 3 references: Stephen L. Young, PhD, Weed Ecologist, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research & Extension Center, 402 West State Farm Road, North Platte, NE 69101. steve.young@unl.edu, 308-696-6712. Posted: 11/13/12.

University of Nevada Reno: The new Interdisciplinary Climate Research Lab in the Department of Geography, led by Dr. Douglas Boyle and Dr. Scott Bassett, has six funded research fellowships for Doctoral students interested in pursuing multi-disciplinary climate research with us and our collaborators at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, University of Maine, the University of Arizona, and University of Texas at Austin. Potential projects include: (1) Hydrologic modeling of paleolake and glacier systems in the Great Basin, South America, and the Tibetan Plateau to improve our understanding of paleoclimate conditions since the Last Glacial Maximum, (2) Investigating the impacts of possible future climate change on agricultural water right acquisitions aimed at improving the environmental conditions of Walker Lake (a terminal lake in Nevada), (3) Investigating the impact of climate change on vegetation dynamics in semi-arid and alpine communities, and (4) Investigating climate driven future land use scenarios in rural agricultural communities. The positions, which are funded through the Nevada State Climate Office (NSCO) and a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), begin in August 2013 and are for four years with half-time monthly salary support of $1,800 during the academic year and the possibility of full-time support during the summer (combined up to $27k/year). Health insurance and partial tuition waivers are also provided. Students with scientific backgrounds in hydrology, climate, geography, planning or ecology and an interest in computer modeling and interdisciplinary research are encouraged to apply. Applicants must send a Curriculum Vitae, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores and a personal statement (1-2 pages) describing your previous research experience and future research interests to Dr. Douglas Boyle (douglasb@unr.edu) and Dr. Scott Bassett (sbassett@unr.edu). Applicants will also need to submit an application to the Geography Ph.D. program. For full consideration all material must be received by March 1, 2013. Posted: 1/24/13.

University of Nevada Reno: Positions (MS/PhD) are available in Anne Leonard’s lab for Fall 2013. Research topics in our group generally relate to plant-pollinator interactions, cognitive ecology and signal evolution. Ongoing projects explore the nutritional ecology of floral rewards, the function of multimodal floral signals, and connections between diet, sleep, and learning in bumble bees. The Biology Department at UNR has particular strengths in plant-animal interactions and the neural mechanisms of learning and memory. Applicants should visit the Leonard lab webpage, as well as the website for the doctoral program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology or the masters program in Biology. Applicants interested in the sleep project should also visit the website of collaborator Alex Keene. MS program deadline: 2/1; PhD program deadline: 2/28. Contact: anneleonard@unr.edu. Posted: 12/20/12.

University of Nevada Reno: The Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology (EECB) at the has new research opportunities and both teaching and research fellowships available for well-qualified students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in fall 2013. We have research opportunities through our interdisciplinary graduate program, which links scientists across multiple departments (Biology, Natural Resources and Environmental Science, Geography, and others), the Desert Research Institute, and various state and federal agencies. Participating departments support about 100 graduate students in EECB and closely associated programs. Accepted Ph.D. students are eligible to receive stipends in the range of $16,800 to $28k per year, plus health benefits and tuition remission. In addition, EECB students are eligible for internal research and travel grants. Students may work in many areas of ecology and evolution, as well as applied areas such as conservation of endangered species, urbanization effects on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and responses of plants and animals to climate change. EECB faculty and graduate students conduct research from South America to the Arctic in a variety of ecosystems. The EECB graduate program is one of the first nationwide to include Conservation Science in our degree. Facilities include the Whittell Forest and Wildlife Area Field Station, Conservation Genetics Center, and the Nevada Genomics Center. UNR is situated on the east side of the Sierra Nevada with easy access to both Lake Tahoe and the Great Basin, areas ideal for both research and recreation. Interested students should contact relevant EECB faculty members to discuss mutual research interests. application and admission information. For any questions, please contact co-directors Dr. Mary Peacock (mpeacock@unr.edu), Dr. Peter Weisberg (pweisberg@cabnr.unr.edu), or EECB program secretary Pauline Jasper (paulinej@unr.edu). Posted: 10/11/12.

University of Nevada Reno: M.S. Position in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science. We seek a highly motivated M.S. student for a two year project beginning January 2013 on the habitat associations and local population dynamics of the pale kangaroo mouse (Microdipodops pallidus) in central Nevada in the context of planned alternative energy development. The candidate will plan, oversee, and participate in field data collection between March and July of each project year. The candidate will work closely with faculty and research staff to establish occupancy rates and build local and regional habitat models for this rare and listed species. The student will be lead on the publications that emerge from their research and will be expected to present results at scientific conferences and to interested agency personnel. Candidates should have experience with small mammal trapping and field identification and would ideally have basic GIS or population modeling skills as well as excellent writing and communication skills. Candidates must have a B.S. degree in a pertinentfield with GPA >3.0 and GRE scores no more than five years old, with a combined score of 1000 or greater for tests taken prior to August 1, 2011 or combined score of 300 or greater for tests taken on or after August 1, 2011. Stipend, health insurance, tuition, and all project operating costs will beprovided. Applications should include a single PDF document including: letter of research interests and career goals, a curriculum vitae, unofficial transcripts, and contact information for 3 references. Applications should be sent as an attachment to Dr. Marjorie Matocq, mmatocq@cabnr.unr.edu. This project is a collaboration between Drs. Marjorie Matocq, Jim Sedinger and Peter Weisberg. Review of applications will begin October 12 and will continue until the position is filled. Posted: 9/25/12.

University of New Hampshire: Opening for a Graduate Research Assistant (M.S. or Ph.D.) in Soil Biogeochemistry in Stuart Grandy's lab to start Fall 2013 or earlier. The position is funded to examine root and mycorrhizal carbon dynamics in biofuel cropping systems. The premise of the project is to determine whether root and mycorrhizal productivity can be enhanced to offset residue C losses in biofuel cropping systems. Within this context, the project can include examination of microbial communities, microbial decomposition pathways, and belowground C transformations and pool dynamics. My preference is for a Ph.D. student with experience in agroecosystems, geochemistry, isotopes, ecosystem science, or microbial ecology. However, highly motivated M.S. applicants with research experience and proven communication and analytical skills will also be considered. The position will be located at UNH with some summer field work at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station in Michigan. The University of New Hampshire has excellent analytical and faculty resources in biogeochemistry, microbial ecology and agroecosystem science, and is highly ranked for its scientific impact in related areas including geoscience, forestry, and climate change science. If interested please contact Stuart Grandy by email (stuart.grandy@unh.edu) with a statement of interest, GPA, and CV. Posted: 12/3/12.

University of New Hampshire: The Hobbie lab invites applications to the UNH Natural Resources and Earth Systems Science (NRESS) Ph.D. Program. We welcome inquiries from motivated students interested in how the interactions of organisms with their environment influence carbon and nutrient cycling. Our lab is an interactive group with interests in ecosystem modeling, remote sensing, the application of stable isotopes in ecology, and belowground processes, particularly mycorrhizal fungi. We are currently looking for students on two projects, one to work on a new global change experiment in northern Minnesota, another to work on biogeochemical consequences of shrub expansion in the Arctic. Incoming Ph.D. students are encouraged to develop their own research projects in these areas. Interested applicants should email Dr. Hobbie (erik.hobbie@unh.edu). The deadline for domestic and international applications is Jan. 15. In your email, include "Ph.D. opportunity" in the subject line, and a brief statement of your current or future research interests (please be as specific as you can), and a curriculum vitae. Posted: 11/2/12.

University of New Hampshire: The Earth Systems Research Center has an opening for a PhD student position in Remote Sensing and Coupled Natural and Human Systems starting in January 2013 or August 2013. This position carries a competitive stipend plus tuition and medical insurance. The PhD student will be responsible for the detection and monitoring of land-cover/land-use change (LCLUC) using satellite data (e.g., Landsat) and the linking of LCLUC data with physical (e.g., ecological, climate, hydrological) and socioeconomic data for the assessment of coupled natural and human systems. Applicants should be enthusiastic, creative, and highly motivated. Experience in remote sensing, particularly image classification and LCLUC detection, is highly desirable. Please submit a cover letter, CV, copies of transcripts, copies of TOEFL/GRE scores if applicable, and the names and contact information of three references to Prof. Jingfeng Xiao via email (j.xiao@unh.edu) with the subject line “Application for PhD Position on Remote Sensing”. Posted: 10/12/12.

University of New Hampshire: We seek a highly motivated Ph.D. student interested in studying aquatic ecosystem processes at the landscape scale. The research will focus on responses of water quantity and quality in a coastal watershed that is suburbanizing but also has increasing beaver populations and beaver ponds. Of particular interest is the role of spatial heterogeneity and hydrologic connectivity among different land uses and aquatic ecosystem types in influencing the biogeochemistry of a suburbanizing watershed. Research activities can include 1) experimental removal of impoundments, including taking advantage of planned anthropogenic dam removals and beaver dam removals, 2) synoptic, watershed-wide, field sampling, 3) geomorphic surveys, 4) ecosystem process measurements across flow conditions, and 5) application of computer models to scale findings to entire river networks in order to understand aggregate impacts of multiple impoundments. The position is funded through the Plum Island Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research site, supported by the National Science Foundation. The study sites are located on the north shore of Massachusetts (Ipswich R. and Parker R. watersheds), part of the Boston metropolitan area. Candidates must have an M.S. degree or comparable experience in ecosystem ecology, biogeochemistry, hydrology, or related field. An interest in conducting field work in suburban and wetland ecosystems is essential. Also, ability or strong interest in developing and refining existing ecosystem models to scale processes from local to watershed scales, as well as ability to work with existing LIDAR data, is desirable. Position is available for start in Fall 2013. The student will be part of a dynamic group of research scientists, graduate students, and post doctoral fellows in the Water Systems Analysis Group working on various hydrology and aquatic ecosystem studies, as well as part of the larger PIE LTER and broader LTER network, offering considerable networking potential. Please send a curriculum vitae, statement of research interests, and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Wilfred Wollheim (wil.wollheim@unh.edu). Applicants will ultimately need to apply to the interdisciplinary Natural Resources and Earth System Science Ph.D. program. Posted: 10/8/12.

University of New Hampshire: A PhD associate position is available with a large interdisciplinary NSF-PIRE funded research project that will examine the social, economic, and ecological implications of bioenergy development in four countries across the Americas: Argentina (eucalyptus for biodiesel), Brazil (conversion of natural forests to soy, palm, and sugarcane for ethanol and biodiesel), Mexico (jatropha for biodiesel), and the U.S. (conversion of hardwood forests to cellulosic ethanol). The focus of this PhD position will be to quantify plant water use (sap flow techniques), water use efficiency, and rainfall interception of biofuel crops and the reference (native) vegetation at each of the four study sites. As part of this PhD position, there will be substantial opportunities to collaborate with other researchers with diverse backgrounds and expertise to conduct more integrated analysis of the impacts of bioenergy production on coupled water, carbon, and nutrient cycles within each of the study systems, and to assess effects of land use conversion on site water balance and water quality. The PhD student will be based at the UNH in Durham, NH, and will be co-advised by Dr. Heidi Asbjornsen (UNH) and Dr. Tom Pypker (Michigan Technological University). The position will also require travel for extended periods of time to each of the four study sites. Minimum qualifications include a M.S. degree (or comparable demonstrated experience) in ecology, plant ecophysiology, ecohydrology, or a related field. Candidates will require a strong analytical background and an ability to manage large data sets and supervise field assistants. Additionally, the prospective candidate should have demonstrated motivation and strong work habits, the ability to work independently as well as within a research group, and demonstrated ability to produce publications based on individual research. Preferred qualifications include experience with sap flow techniques, hydrometeorological analyses, and/or other field approaches for measuring plant, soil, or water dynamics. Proficiency in Spanish and/or Portuguese is also desirable. Interested candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, statement of interest, transcripts (unofficial versions are acceptable), and the names of three references to Heidi Asbjornsen, heidi.asbjornsen@unh.edu or Tom Pypker, tgpypker@mtu.edu. Review of applications will begin October 30, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. The anticipated start date is sometime between January and May 2013 (negotiable). Funding is available for a total of four years (one year Teaching Assistantship and three years Research Assistantship). Posted: 10/4/12.

University of New Mexico: Ph.D. Students Wanted! Ecology and evolution of plants and plant-animal interactions. My lab is broadly interested in the ecology and evolution of plants and their communities, often focusing on plant-animal interactions such as herbivory, seed predation, and seed dispersal. We use a combination of field, greenhouse, phylogenetic, experimental evolution, and molecular genetic approaches. Students are expected to develop their own independent projects, but will also have opportunities to collaborate on NSF-funded investigations of hybridization in wild sunflowers and the role of genetic diversity in invasions. The lab is also starting new projects in desert and alpine ecosystems at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge and the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab. Students will be a part of a dynamic group of plant biology, ecology, and evolution researchers at UNM. For more info please contact me (and send along a CV): Ken Whitney (whitneyk@unm.edu). Posted: 10/18/12.

University of North Carolina at Charlotte: Funded PhD Studentship in Remote Sensing and Forest Landscape Modeling. Drs. Gang Chen and Ross Meentemeyer in the Department of Geography and Earth Sciences seek a PhD student with a strong interest to develop remote sensing algorithms designed to model landscape-scale changes in forest structure and carbon storage following interacting ecological disturbances (forest disease and wildfire) in coastal forests of California. The ideal candidate should have basic training in remote sensing and GIScience, environmental modeling, statistical analysis and programming. If you are interested, please send a CV and statement of research interests to Dr. Gang Chen (Gang.Chen@uncc.edu). The position is open until filled and is expected to start in August 2013. Posted: 12/14/12.

University of North Dakota: There are opportunities for students to gain a Master of Science Degree in Earth System Science and Policy in projects focused on the dynamics of regional ecosystems in North and South Dakota and Minnesota. Research topics can include assessment of regional ecosystem services, regional ecosystem modeling, remote sensing of grasslands and savannas and analysis of land use/land cover change impacts. Projects could make use of skills in GIS, image processing, programming, and spatial modeling which are developed during coursework. As outlined in a previous advertisement, the Sheyenne National Grassland provides specific opportunities for MS research projects that involve close interaction with the US Forest Service. Full tuition waivers are available for successful applicants. Students from a wide range of fields such as Natural Resource Management, Ecology, Geography, Geology, Environmental Science, Climatology, Hydrology, and the Social and Political Sciences are encouraged to apply as there are opportunities in other interdisciplinary research areas as well.. Applications from students in the nearby states (ND, SD, MN, MT, WY, WI) and Canadian Provinces (SK, MB) are particularly encouraged. ESSP is an interdisciplinary department which focuses on environmental sustainability. The ESSP Department has faculty with diverse expertise including earth science, ecosystem science, agronomy, glaciology, hydrology, climate science, environmental economics, and environmental policy. Three degrees are offered through the department: Master of Environmental Management (M.E.M.), M.S., and Ph.D. All students must complete 20 credits of compulsory coursework in Earth System Science and Policy 501/502 during the first two semesters of their degree. Interested students should see the UND Graduate School website for application instructions, and the ESSP Departmental web page (http://essp.und.edu/) to explore the range of courses and faculty expertise. Students can contact Dr. Michael J. Hill for further information at (701) 777-6071, or by e-mail: hillmj@aero.und.edu. Recommended deadlines for application are February 1st for a March 1st decision, and April 15th for a May 15th decision. Tuition waivers are provided on a first qualified basis. Students must apply to the UND Graduate School in the first instance, and satisfy all application requirements before they will be assessment by the Department. Posted: 1/22/13, revised: 2/28/13.

University of North Dakota: The Department of Earth System Science and Policy offers great opportunities for students to obtain a Master of Environmental Management degree. Successful graduates have an outstanding record of gaining high quality employment. A combination of the diverse training, and the experience gained in the mandatory internship, has led to recent graduates obtaining excellent jobs in federal, state and local government, or in consulting. Some have redirected their interests back towards research and further education specifically as a result their internship experiences. Full tuition waivers are available for successful applicants. Students from a wide range of fields are encouraged to apply as this degree is designed to accommodate very diverse academic backgrounds. Applications from students in the nearby states (ND, SD, MN, MT, WY, WI) and Canadian Provinces (SK, MB) are particularly encouraged. Earth System Science and Policy is an interdisciplinary department which focuses on environmental sustainability. The ESSP Department has faculty with diverse expertise including earth science, ecosystem science, agronomy, glaciology, hydrology, climate science, environmental economics, and environmental policy. Students must complete 20 credits of compulsory coursework in Earth System Science and Policy 501/502 during the first two semesters of their degree. MEM students are required to complete an internship. Students can generally obtain interesting and challenging internships with local, state, federal and international agencies. Interested students should see the UND Graduate School for application instructions, and the ESSP Department to explore the range of courses and faculty expertise. Contact Dr. Michael J. Hill in the first instance for further information at (701) 777-6071, or by e-mail: hillmj@aero.und.edu. Recommended deadlines for application are February 1st for a March 1st decision, and April 15th for a May 15th decision. Tuition waivers are provided on a first qualified basis. Students must apply to the UND Graduate School in the first instance, and satisfy all application requirements before they will be assessed by the Department. Posted: 12/13/12.

University of North Dakota: Seeking graduate students (MS or PhD) in Earth System Science and Policy in projects focused on the Sheyenne National Grassland. Research could specialize in or combine mapping, monitoring, modeling and assessment of existing management regimes. The primary areas of research involve development of better vegetation maps of the grassland, historical and contemporary landscape ecology, and assessment of impacts of existing management regimes. For more details, contact Michael J. Hill. Posted: 10/25/12.

University of North Dakota: Positions are open for graduate students seeking a Master of Science or Ph.D. Degrees in Earth System Science and Policy with research interests in environmental change and impacts related to climate change and water resources using remote sensing and GIS techniques combined with field work. The primary area of research involves studying changes in North American glaciers and how these changes relate to climate fluctuations, as well as the impacts on downstream water use. This study involves the use of remote sensing and GIS techniques in which ENVI remote sensing and ESRI GIS software will be utilized in analyzing ASTER and Landsat images, Aerial Photography, and Digital Elevation Models. Knowledge of either software and/or the above data types is desirable, but not necessary. Field work is likely to occur during the late summer months and some experience in wilderness travel is desired but also not necessary. Field work will consist of using high accuracy GPS, laser range finder, ice penetrating radar, stream flow meter, and meteorological equipment. These topics can be tailored to fit a M.S. or Ph.D. degree. Tuition waivers are available and funding in the form of Research Assistantships may be available in the future. Students from a wide range of fields are encouraged to apply, such as Geography, Geology, Environmental Science, Climatology, Hydrology as well as many others in environmental majors. Earth System Science and Policy is an interdisciplinary department which focuses on environmental sustainability. Three degrees are offered through the department: Master of Environmental Management (M.E.M.), M.S., and Ph.D. If the above research topics is of interest, please see the UND Graduate School website for application instructions, or contact Dr. Jeff VanLooy of the Department of Earth System Science and Policy (701-777-4755, jvanlooy@aero.und.edu). Recommended deadline for application is June 1st however, early applications will receive top priority for admission. Posted: 10/23/12.

University of Northern Colorado: I am recruiting a student who is interested in pursuing an M.S. degree in Biology starting this Fall of 2013. The research involves tripartite interactions among plants, mycorrhizal fungi and insects. For more details please visit: http://www.gomezlab.com Interested candidates could contact me via E-mail at Karen.Gomez@unco.edu or by phone 970-351-2555. Posted: 2/27/13, revised: 5/7/13.

University of Oklahoma: PhD student opportunity in Land Use Effects on Water Quality using Remote Sensing. The Landscape Land Use Change Institute (LLUCI) seeks a PhD student to investigate “Land management impacts on water quality in New Zealand Rivers.” A research assistantship will be provided with competitive salary, research/travel funds, tuition, and health insurance. Qualifications: MA/MS in Geography, Natural Resources, Environmental Sciences, or other Remote sensing-related science. Skills in: Remote sensing analysis (ENVI/IDL), Geographic Information Systems, and Statistics are desired. The ideal candidate will also have knowledge of fluvial geomorphology, watershed science, agricultural systems, or landscape ecology. The selected student will be responsible for: (1) MODIS and Landsat imagery collection, processing and analysis; (2) collection and analysis of water quality data and weather data from existing databases; and (3) synthesis of the above data with socioeconomic and land use data provided by consultants and agencies in New Zealand. The student will spend at least one month in New Zealand conducting fieldwork and meeting with stakeholders. Contact: Please send a CV, statement of research interests, contact information for three references, refereed publications, and unofficial transcripts to jjulian@ou.edu by December 1. For additional information about this position, contact Dr. Jason Julian (jjulian@ou.edu) or Dr. Kirsten de Beurs (kdebeurs@ou.edu). The Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability’s graduate program full application deadline is January 15. Posted: 10/11/12.

University of Oklahoma: The Ecolab of Dr. Yiqi Luo seeks candidates for three post-doctoral fellows and two graduate students to conduct research in the following areas: Theoretical analysis of land carbon cycle: We are looking for candidates with strong theoretical and mathematical training to analyze land carbon cycle. The land carbon cycle can be mathematically expressed as a nonautonomous linear system using an ordinary differential matrix equation (see Luo and Weng, 2011, Trends in Ecology & Evolution. 26:96-104.) The successful candidates will interact with mathematicians and ecologists to analyze the nonautonomous linear system to understand its fundamental properties and potential applications in carbon cycle research. Data assimilation with ecosystem models: We are looking for candidates to develop and apply data assimilation techniques to improve coupled carbon-nitrogen cycle models at ecosystem, regional, and global scales. Data sources are from global change experiments, FLUXNET, satellites, and various networks of observations. Data assimilation is used to estimate parameters, evaluate alternative model structures, analyze uncertainty and its sources of model predictions, and quantify information content of various data sets. Data analysis and synthesis: We are looking for candidates to carry out data analysis at FLUXNET and data synthesis at global change experiments. Data synthesis is to integrate diverse results from numerous experiments in a wide range of ecosystems and to reveal general mechanisms of ecosystem responses to global change. Data analysis is to take advantage of a worldwide network of flux measurement to uncover fundamental mechanisms driving ecosystem dynamics. Ecosystem modeling: We are currently collaborating with several research groups to combine data from laboratory and field studies with ecosystem models in grasslands, Tundra, and forests. We are looking for candidates to develop and modify the Terrestrial Ecosystem (TECO) model to simulate ecosystem responses to global change in those ecosystems. Candidates who are interested in integrating microbial genomics data into ecosystem models are particularly encouraged to apply for the position. Requirements for the post-doctoral positions include: (1) a PhD in ecology, statistics, mathematics, or related areas, (2) demonstrated experience with advanced statistical analysis and/or modeling techniques, (3) strong quantitative skills together with basic ecology training, and 4) high motivation and ability to interact and collaborate with other scientists. Requirements for the graduate assistantships are consistent with those for graduate admission at the University of Oklahoma plus enthusiasm for and commitment on ecological research. To apply for a specific position, please contact: Dr. Yiqi Luo, Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, email: yluo@ou.edu. Posted: 8/7/12.

University of Pittsburgh: Applications are invited for PhD assistantships in the Elliott Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory, Department of Geology & Planetary Sciences. We are seeking new graduate students to join our dynamic and interdisciplinary research group dedicated to using stable isotope geochemistry to examine nitrogen dynamics in atmospheric-ecosystem-hydrologic systems. Specific projects include examination of reactive nitrogen dynamics in urban watersheds, quantifying fluxes and sources of atmospheric deposition, tracking sources of nitrogen eutrophication to surface waters, quantifying gaseous nitrogen fluxes from watersheds, and assessing the impact of non-conventional natural gas extraction activities (Marcellus) on the nitrogen status of regional ecosystems. Our work spans Earth systems and land use types (including forested watersheds, agricultural ecosystems, and urban watersheds). Candidates from diverse disciplinary backgrounds are welcome, but prior research experience is required. M.S. degree preferred. Interested candidates are encouraged to contact Dr. Elliott directly (eelliott@pitt.edu) via an email that briefly describes research experiences and interests. Anticipated start date is September 2013. Applications received prior to January 31, 2013 will receive fullest consideration. Posted: 1/4/13.

University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras: The NSF-funded IGERT program, Natural-Human Systems in the Urbanizing Tropics, aims to train Ph.D. students to develop interdisciplinary and collaborative research for environmental problems in urbanizing, tropical landscapes. Puerto Rico has had a dynamic environmental history, suffering nearly complete deforestation, then enjoying forest recovery, and then experiencing urban sprawl as the economy modernized. This last shift produced environmental problems, overlaid by changes in climate and vulnerability to catastrophic storms, making Puerto Rico an ideal place to conduct integrative research. IGERT research can focus on many topics involving environmental themes in the urbanized tropics such as climate, water, food security, renewable energy, waste management, biodiversity, and urban system services. Fellows work together with natural and social science faculty as well as government agencies, NGOs, and community groups to develop dissertation questions that directed to environmental problems in Puerto Rico and beyond. Benefits: $30k/year for two years; $2k for travel and education materials; office, computer and software usage; reserved space in all special courses and workshops. See the link above for details and to apply. Posted: 11/5/12.

University of Queensland: We are currently advertising a 2 year postdoc position and a PhD top-up scholarship to work on modelling ecosystem services / biodiversity relationships at the University of Queensland. An outstanding and motivated PhD candidate is being sought to work as part of a research team on understanding spatial relationships between ecosystem services and biodiversity. The project is supported by the ARC Discovery Project: Achieving Biodiversity Conservation and Ecosystem Service Delivery: the Role of Landscape Structure. This PhD project will work on developing novel approaches for characterising the relationships between ecosystem services and biodiversity. The focus area for the project will be South East Queensland and will involve both computer-based spatial analysis and field work. The studentship will be located at The University of Queensland's St Lucia campus within the Landscape Ecology and Conservation Group (LECG) and the Biophysical Remote Sensing Group (BRG), with a multi-disciplinary advisory team. The successful candidate will have a 1st class Honours degree (or equivalent) in the field of ecology or related discipline, with a strong interest in biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services. Experience with spatial analysis and wildlife surveys (particularly of native Australian birds) will be an advantage. See the full job ad for details. Closing Date: 29 Mar 2013. Posted: 2/7/13.

University of Queensland: I have started a new academic position at UQ, Brisbane, Australia. I am currently building a new Research Group in Sustainable Production and Consumption. I am actively looking for graduate students who are passionate to pursue a Masters of Research or PhD in Industrial Ecology, Life Cycle Assessment, Cleaner Production, Eco-efficiency and Sustainability Analysis with particular application to renewable energy (e.g. solar, biofuels), food, transportation, mining, and tourism industries. Email your expression of interests, CV, and other relevant materials to Anthony Halog (a.halog@uq.edu.au). There are available scholarships at UQ as well as scholarships offered by Australian Government to students coming from developed and developing countries. There is also a possibility to support from internal funding and potential top-up allowance from CSIRO. If you are about to finish or have finished your PhD, feel free to express your interest because there are also available postdoctoral fellowships. Posted: 10/10/12.

University of Regina: I have an opening for a student with an ecological background to pursue a graduate degree in arctic-alpine, grassland, or forest systems. Potential research projects include growth-form effects on N cycling at contrasting altitudes, biological invasions, and vegetation restoration. This position starts in mid-2013 with full salary and generous research support. Applicants need a driver's license and an ability to work independently, especially in the field. The position is based in Regina, Canada with fieldwork in Canada and Sweden. Application deadline is November 15 2012. Please email a letter, résumé, contact information for three references, and unofficial transcripts to Scott Wilson (scott.wilson.uregina@gmail.com). Posted: 10/12/12.

University of Rhode Island: Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistantship, Department of Natural Resources Sciences. Position available for the fall of 2013 in the laboratory of Dr. Laura Meyerson. Research is in the area of invasive species ecology/evolution. Specifically, the project focuses on an invasive plant species (Phragmites australis) and genetic diversity and genome size. Research will be based in Kingston, RI but may also involve travel and field work in North America and Europe. In addition to an annual stipend, the assistantship includes a tuition waiver and health benefits. Availability to begin summer 2013 is desirable. If you are interested in joining my laboratory, please send me an email ( lameyerson@mail.uri.edu). Include with the message a CV containing a brief summary of accomplishments (applicable skills, educational background, GPA, GRE scores, and academic major if applicable) and a statement of potential research interests. Posted: 2/14/13, revised: 2/27/13.

University of Rhode Island: Ph.D. research assistantship available in Turtle Ecology and Conservation on a USDA-funded project that will examine how forest fragmentation and creation of early-successional habitats affect turtle demography and movements. Field research includes trapping, marking, and conducting radio-telemetry on turtles at numerous wetlands in Rhode Island. “Laboratory” work will include using a geographic information system to identify suitable wetlands and model turtle movements relative to proximity and size of forest fragments, as well as quantifying the demographic consequences of forest loss near wetlands for turtle populations. Selected student must be able to start by January 2013. Applicants should be hard-working, self-motivated field biologists with a strong interest in wetlands and turtle conservation. Field experience with turtles and radio-telemetry, and proficiency in the use of geographic information systems are required. Experience in handling snapping turtles will be looked upon favorably. Driver’s license is necessary. Applicants must have successfully completed a research master’s degree in ecology or related field, have at least a 3.0 undergraduate GPA, and must have taken the GRE. International students for whom English is not their first language will need to have taken the TOEFL. Strong writing, oral communication, and statistical skills are required. Research assistantship provides a stipend of approximately $25k/yr (3 years of RA support guaranteed; potential for two additional years of TA support), health insurance, and a tuition waiver. To apply submit the following by email: a letter stating your qualifications and research interests, CV, copies of college transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for three references (not letters) by no later than 5 September 2012 (early application is encouraged!) to Dr. Nancy E. Karraker, Department of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (401-874-2916; nkarraker@mail.uri.edu). Posted: 8/7/12.

University of St Andrews/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology: We are currently looking for a student to undertake a PhD to analyse data from the Pan-African Great Ape Monitoring Program. This program is conducted by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, with advice on survey design from the Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling (CREEM) at St Andrews. It seeks to estimate abundance of bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas by conducting line transect surveys of nests throughout their ranges. The student will be based at CREEM, on a studentship fully funded by the University of St Andrews and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. The project will be to analyse the survey data, first to estimate abundance by region, and then to develop spatial models to quantify how density varies through each region. For more information, contact Steve Buckland (steve@st-andrews.ac.uk) or Jessi Junker (jessica_junker@eva.mpg.de). Posted: 5/30/13.

University of Saskatchewan: A fully funded PhD. position in grassland restoration ecology is available starting in May 2013. We are looking for an individual with an MSc. degree or equivalent and demonstrated research productivity in Plant Ecology, Rangeland Ecology and Management, Agroecology, or a related field. The position is co-supervised by Dr. Eric Lamb (Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan) and Dr. Mike Schellenberg (Semiarid Prairie Agricultural Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada). The project will focus on the development and testing of native species mixes for cattle grazing and grassland restoration. Specific objectives include evaluating the long-term productivity of native species mixes with a focus on factors promoting persistence of desirable species and the influence of weather conditions on productivity. There is considerable flexibility within this project for the pursuit of additional research objectives defined by the student. The successful candidate will be based in Saskatoon during the winter months and Swift Current during the summer. Fieldwork at the AAFC Brandon and Lethbridge sites will provide the opportunity to work extensively with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada scientists across western Canada. To apply, please e-mail eric.lamb@usask.ca with a CV and cover letter outlining your research interests and career goals. Closes: 2/10/13. Posted: 1/3/13.

University of Saskatchewan: 1 PhD and 2 Master's positions in Dr. Christy Morrissey's Wildlife Ecotoxicology Lab. (1) PhD position: Aquatic invertebrate ecotoxicology: Duration: 3 years from start date: ideally January 2013. The student will be involved in a collaborative setting to look at multiple aspects of a newer class of insecticides affecting arthropod survival, abundance and community composition in agricultural wetlands in the Canadian Prairies. Macroinvertebrate collections across a range of wetlands and landscapes will be used to evaluate natural abundance and the role of neonicotinoids in altering macroinvertebrate populations and communities in addition to species-specific experimental approaches using in situ and laboratory dosing studies. We are looking for an enthusiastic and motivated student with a solid academic background and a strong interest in ecology or toxicology. Ideal candidate will have experience working in both the lab and field with research experience in the area of aquatic toxicology or invertebrate ecology. Specific requirements include 1) MSc (or BSc with extensive experience) in Toxicology, Ecology, or Environmental studies with strong academic record (80% or better) 2) Experience in identification of aquatic (larval) macroinvertebrates 3) Strong writing and communication skills 4) Self motivated and able to work independently and as part of a team 5) Drivers licence required. (2) Masters position: Multiple stressors affecting American dippers Duration: 2 years from start date: ideally January 2013 or Sept 2013. The student will work in partnership with Environment Canada to assess ecotoxicology and multiple stressors affecting American dippers (Cinclus cinclus) wintering in southern British Columbia including small scale hydroelectric developments, alterations in river flow, mercury and selenium pollution. Position is based out of Saskatoon with field work in mountainous river habitats in British Columbia. Extensive field work is involved in autumn and winter and will require working in remote areas. We will evaluate stress hormones in feces and blood of dippers as well as evaluate Hg and Se concentrations in non breeding birds for integration with larger datasets on mercury pollution in dippers across Western North America. We are looking for an enthusiastic and motivated student with a solid academic background and a strong interest in ecology or toxicology. Ideal candidate will have experience working in avian wildlife with previous lab or field research experience. Specific requirements include 1) BSc degree in Ecology, Toxicology or Environmental studies with strong academic record (80% or better) 2) Experience in mistnetting and handling of birds with potential to get a banding permit 3) Experience with blood sampling passerines and/or working in rivers is an asset. 4) Drivers licence required 5) Strong writing and communication skills 6) Self motivated and able to work independently and with a team. (3) Masters position: Indirect effects of pesticides on insectivorous birds. Duration: 2 years from start date: ideally January 2013. The student will work as part of a team to explore multiple impacts of a newer class of insecticides, the neonicotinoids, on insectivorous birds in the Canadian Prairies. The work will build on an existing 21-year tree swallow project in Saskatchewan to establish and expand a nestbox study on previously identified wetlands that differ in terms of agricultural land use and neonicotinoid use. The student will identify farmland bird occupancy of agricultural wetlands through surveys and measure productivity, provisioning rates and physiological stress in nestling Tree swallows in addition to contributing to annual survival estimates. We are looking for an enthusiastic and motivated student with a solid academic background and a strong interest in ecology or toxicology. Ideal candidate will have experience working in avian wildlife with previous lab or field research experience. Specific requirements include 1) BSc degree in Ecology, Toxicology or Environmental studies with strong academic record (80% or better) 2) Experience in bird surveys and handling of birds with potential to get a banding permit 3) Experience with blood sampling passerines is an asset. 4) Drivers licence required 5) Strong writing and communication skills 6) Self motivated and able to work independently and as part of a team. How to apply: If interested and qualified, please send a statement of interest, your CV (including names of references), and a copy of your unofficial transcript by email to Dr. Morrissey (christy.morrissey@usask.ca). Application deadline: Dec. 31, 2012 or as soon as possible. Posted: 11/20/12.

University of Saskatchewan: An exciting opportunity is available for a Ph.D. student in the Wildlife Ecology and Community Engagement Lab of Dr. Ryan Brook. Our research group has initiated a study investigating the ecology and management of moose in the agriculture-dominated landscape of Saskatchewan with a focus on understanding the role of habitat and the risks of moose-vehicle collisions. We are GPS-collaring moose in collaboration with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment, and these data will form the primary basis of the project, in addition to existing collision data and other habitat information. This is anticipated to be a four year project. The philosophy of our research group is to train students in research design by giving each student considerable latitude to develop some aspects of their project in ways that best fit their skills and career aspirations. In addition to an education with a focus on strong science and critical thinking, students will gain valuable practical experience in Geographic Information Systems and spatial analysis. Fieldwork will include participation in monitoring collared animals, retrieving mortalities, and validating GIS layers. The student will also be trained in communication and knowledge translation and will contribute to stakeholder consultation and sharing project objectives and outcomes, as well as participating in our school-based education program and media relations. Applicants with relevant field experience, GIS skills, knowledge of working with large datasets, proven skills in statistical analysis, and strong communication capacity will be given preference. The successful applicant will ideally begin September 2013 (though there may be some flexibility). During the first year, the student will be expected to seek scholarships, complete coursework, and develop and defend a research proposal. Stipend is $18k/year (plus tuition release; ~$3,900 for CDN students and ~$5,500 for international students) and this can be supplemented with additional scholarships and awards. Applicants must have an M.Sc. (or equivalent) in biology, ecology, geography, environmental science, veterinary medicine, or a related field and must meet the admission requirements for the College of Agriculture & Bioresources. Interested candidates should email a letter of interest, CV, and indication of academic performance (unofficial transcripts acceptable at this stage) to Dr. Ryan Brook (ryan.brook@usask.ca) based in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources. Application review will begin February 15, 2013 and will continue until the position is filled. Posted: 11/9/12.

University of South Dakota: A two-year Graduate Research Assistantship in Aquatic Ecology (M.S. or Ph.D.) is available in the lab of Dr. Jeff Wesner, Department of Biology, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. The project will address the effects of fish diversity loss on aquatic and riparian ecosystems, and will include field surveys and mesocosm experiments. Available resources include a new, >22,000 square foot outdoor aquatic mesocosm facility, and access to the nearby Missouri River and other field sites. Two years of 12-month RA support are available, which could fund a full M.S. or partial Ph.D. with 9-month teaching assistantships available for the remainder. Interested students should email a C.V., writing sample (on any topic, science or otherwise), short email explaining interest in the position, and contact information for three references to Dr. Jeff Wesner, jeffwesner@gmail.com. Posted: 5/30/13.

University of South Florida: The Department of Integrative Biology is accepting applications for students to enter their integrative graduate education program in Ecology and Evolution, Environmental and Ecological Microbiology, or Physiology and Morphology. Our department is committed to train the next generation of graduate students to prepare them for professional success in the fields of biological sciences that mirror our faculty’s expertise, which emphasizes organismal interactions and adaptations to the environment at all scales, from microorganisms to complex plants and animals. Our program of graduate study is designed to foster the development of technical and analytical skills used in existing and emerging fields of discovery. Increasingly, students are given opportunities to include an international experience in their research projects and also be involved in outreach activities. The research and training ongoing in the Department contributes to advancements in both basic science and applications to real world problems. Application files must be complete and received by the Biology Graduate Office before January 1, 2013 to be considered for Fall 2013 Teaching Positions or the University Graduate Fellowship. Students can pursue a M.S. or Ph.D degree in Biology. Each of the degrees requires a student to identify an area of concentration. The program offers: • M.S. in Biology, Concentration in Ecology and Evolution (EEV) • M.S. in Biology, Concentration in Environmental and Ecological Microbiology (EVM) • M.S. in Biology, Concentration in Physiology and Morphology (PMY) • Ph.D. in Biology, Concentration in Ecology and Evolution (EEV) • Ph.D. in Biology, Concentration in Environmental and Ecological Microbiology (EVM) • Ph.D. in Biology, Concentration in Physiology and Morphology (PMY). Faculty research interests include: biomechanics and functional morphology; ecology (marine and freshwater, conservation, restoration, population, community and ecosystem); ecological genetics and epigenetics; ecophysiology; ecotoxicology; environmental microbiology; evolution; gene transfer; genomics; microbial physiology; research synthesis; and response to climate change. Faculty who are currently accepting students into their laboratories: * Bell, Susan- Marine Ecology * Crisman, Thomas- Freshwater Ecology * Deban, Stephen- Physiology, Biomechanics, and Evolution * Fox, Gordon- Plant Ecology, Conservation Biology, and Population Biology * Harwood, Valerie- Microbial Water Quality * Lajeunesse, Marc- Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Research Synthesis * Lewis, David- Ecosystem & Landscape Ecology, Biogeochemistry * Martin, Lynn- Ecological Physiology and Immunology * McCoy, Earl- Conservation Ecology * Motta, Philip- Functional Morphology * Mushinsky, Henry- Conservation Ecology * Pierce, Sidney- Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry * Richards, Christina- Plant Ecological Genomics and Epigenetics * Rohr, Jason- Ecology * Scott, Kathleen- Microbial Physiology and Biogeochemistry * Stiling, Peter- Ecology. Posted: 10/29/12.

University of Southern California: We seek to recruit a highly motivated doctoral student to pursue dissertation research on the evolutionary history of the island fox, Urocyon littoralis. The island fox is smaller than its progenitor, the mainland gray fox, and includes six subspecies, each restricted to a different island in Southern California’s Channel Islands due to their unique migratory history during the Ice Age and thereafter. Extreme population crashes have occurred on several of the islands, leading to federal protection for a subset of the subspecies. The work will take advantage of fossils and historical samples from museum collections, taken before the population crashes, as well as recent samples. The research will be part of a multidisciplinary project (molecular, morphological and paleontological) involving collaboration between the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies and the University of Southern California. This is a funded project and the Ph.D. student will have five years of support (including tuition remission) through a combination of RAships, TAships and fellowships. Analyses of genetic and morphological changes can be used to address a number of important questions. When did the fox arrive at each island and how much migration has there been amongst islands? Were humans (Paleo-Indians) involved in the colonization of each island? What is the genetic basis for the evolution of dwarfism? How much genetic variation has been lost due to population bottlenecks on the different islands? Potential applicants are encouraged to contact either Xiaoming Wang (xwang@nhm.org) or Suzanne Edmands (sedmands@usc.edu) for more information. Apply to the Integrative and Evolutionary Biology Graduate Program. To receive full consideration for university fellowships, applications should be submitted by December 1, 2012. Later applications will also be considered. Posted: 11/29/12.

University of Tasmania: PhD project opportunities in the School of Zoology on Tasmanian devils and their contagious cancer. The project: Are Tasmanian devils adapting to changing selection pressures with severe mortality from facial tumour disease? Tasmanian devils, the world's largest marsupial carnivore, are disappearing in the wild from a novel contagious cancer. Almost all animals contract the disease and die once they reach sexual maturity. Strong selection is expected on life history and behavioural traits that may increase lifetime reproductive output of individuals. We have demonstrated that devils show phenotypic plasticity in their life history in response to this strong selection, with increased food allowing faster growth rates and an increase in precocial breeding. This study will use genomic sequencing to construct pedigrees of devils at sites where we have studied populations from before disease arrival. We will investigate changes in selection on life history and behavioural traits and examine explore whether there are changes occurring at a genetic level. It will be cosupervised by Dr Chris Burridge. What kind of person could do this project? This is a laboratory and computer-based genetics study with a strong bioinformatics/analytical component. There will be some opportunity to visit field sites and participate in trapping wild devils. Project funding: This project has part-funding under of an ARC project "Can Tasmanian devils adapt and survive" by Menna Jones. Scholarships: Domestic students (Australia and New Zealand) can apply for an Australian Postgraduate Award (APA) through the University of Tasmania worth $24,653, with merit-based schemes available for top-ups. International students: UTAS offers a number of schemes by which international students can obtain a scholarship; some offer assistance with tuition fees. Prospective candidates are also encouraged to seek scholarship schemes from their own country. When to apply: Scholarship applications can be submitted any time of year. The outcome of applications is usually known within 6 weeks and commencement can start immediately following acceptance. UTAS provides a free laptop to all PhD students and funding schemes for international conference attendance during the PhD. Contact: Dr Menna Jones (Menna.Jones@utas.edu.au, Phone: +61 407 815606). Posted: 3/25/13.

University of Technology, Sydney: Ph.D. Scholarship Opportunity: Molecular biology, bioinformatics, plant-stress physiology and climate change. Monitoring the health and survival of seagrass populations: developing molecular markers. The Aquatic Processes Group is a dynamic multi-disciplinary research team within the UTS Plant Functional Biology and Climate Change Cluster (C3). Members include plant physiologists, molecular biologists, biochemists, microbial ecologists, photosynthetic and cellular energetic modellers, oceanographers, bioinformaticians, optical physicists as well as a range of high profile international collaborators. We are seeking a PhD candidate to join our research group. This project uses gene expression profiling to identify markers for monitoring the physiological state of seagrass populations. Seagrasses are marine keystone species, forming an essential ecosystem in coastal waters for sustaining a wide range of marine wildlife. Worldwide seagrass populations are declining rapidly. This project aims to identify molecular markers to probe the health of seagrass populations in order to ensure their survival. Using state-of-the-art plant molecular biology and bioinformatics tools, in combination with photobiology and plant physiology techniques, this project is a unique training opportunity for a keen and motivated young scientist who wants to be part of a dynamic and successful laboratory carrying out important research addressing environmental issues. Significantly, this work will be performed in collaboration with experts from CSIRO, contributing to an on-going seagrass research project. In particular, the project will involve gene expression studies and bioinformatical analysis of next-generation sequencing data (transcriptomics and genomics). The student will be supervised by Professor Peter Ralph (UTS) and Dr Martin Schliep (UTS) with additional co-supervision from a CSIRO expert through a CSIRO top-up scholarship scheme. The successful applicant will: i) identify environmental conditions affecting seagrass abundance ii) apply plant physiology, bioinformatics and molecular biology techniques to understand the negative effects on seagrass health, iii) determine the importance of a healthy root system to the overall performance of a seagrass meadow, and iv) develop molecular methods to monitor seagrass health. Desirable skills: Applicants should have first class honours (or Masters Degree) in plant molecular biology or any other relevant discipline. Australian and New Zealand applicants will be preferred; other applicants will need to be competitive for an international postgraduate research scholarship at UTS which covers tuition fees for 3 years. This usually means having a Masters degree (or equivalent) with several publications. The successful candidate will be eligible for full funding through a full scholarship ($24,653AUD p.a.) plus a highly prestigious CSIRO top-up scholarship ($7,000AUD p.a.), and a generous research allowance. How to apply: Enquires to Dr Martin Schliep (martin.schliep@uts.edu.au). Applicants must include: 1. Full CV combined with a statement of research intent for undertaking this particular PhD project 2. Three referees 3. Research proposal (one page) - aligned with the project described above. Applications close: 24 February 2013, Start date: From March 2013. Posted: 1/25/13.

University of Tennessee: A Ph.D. graduate research assistantship (pdf) is anticipated to be available spring semester of 2013 in the area of sustainable horticultural crop production, with an emphasis on non-chemical alternatives to methyl bromide fumigation in Tennessee vegetable production systems. The successful applicant will conduct research to optimize carbon-source rates and C:N ratios of soil amendments used in anaerobic soil disinfestation and evaluate responses of key plant pathogens and weeds as well as impacts on soil fertility, plant nutrition, and crop performance. The selected applicant will be expected to conduct field, greenhouse, growth chamber and lab research activities leading to publication of research results in scientific journals. The successful applicant will also be responsible for implementing on-farm demonstration trials with cooperating producers. The position will be based in Dr. David Butler’s Lab in the Department of Plant Sciences, with close collaboration with Dr. Bonnie Ownley’s Lab in the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. Screening of applicants will begin in September 2012 and continue until the position is filled. The earliest projected start date would be January 2013. To apply, send a 1-page letter of intent outlining interest in the position and career goals, along with a current resume or CV and copies of college transcripts and GRE scores to Dr. Butler (dbutler@utk.edu). Posted: 9/24/12.

University of Texas at Arlington: I invite applications for a PhD position in macroecology in the Passy lab. The successful applicant is expected to have expertise in invertebrate or fish ecology and a strong statistical background. She/he will further develop the hierarchical theory of macroecology (SI Passy, 2012, Ecology Letters 15: 923-934) by exploring how local to regional environmental factors constrain the body size, abundance, and distribution of macroinvertebrates and fish across functional guilds. The project will be at the interface of macroecology and conservation. To apply, please e-mail your CV, a statement of research interests, GRE scores, TOEFL scores for international students, and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Sophia Passy (sophia.passy@uta.edu). Review of applications will begin immediately. Posted: 10/8/12.

University of Texas-Brownsville: We are inviting applications for a graduate position (MSc) that includes 8-9 hours/week as assistant instructor in undergraduate biology laboratory classes. The appointment is to begin Fall 2013 in the Biological Sciences Department. This position additionally includes a research component investigating the ecology and conservation of wildlife species in south Texas thornscrub and coastal communities. The Graduate Assistant will be expected to develop a research project examining the population dynamics and movements of wildlife species in response to management practices and habitat manipulations. Areas of potential research include population and individual responses to prescribed burns, supplemental feed and water, and land-use practices. Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree in biology, ecology or a related field. Successful candidates must demonstrate an aptitude for research and ability to work independently. Prior experience in vertebrate and/or wildlife ecology is preferred, as is the ability to conduct fieldwork occasionally under hot weather conditions. A current, valid U.S. driver's license and good driving record is also preferred. The successful applicant will be expected to enroll full time in either the UTB Biology or Interdisciplinary Sciences Masters program (emphasis in Biology) pursuing the thesis option. The available teaching assistantship has $1100 per month, is benefits eligible, and includes a waiver for in-state-tuition for out-of-state students. Interested applicants should send to Dr. Kenneth Pruitt (kenneth.pruitt@utb.edu) a copy of their CV or resume, GPA and GRE scores, a written statement of graduate research interests, and contact information for two references. Posted: 5/29/13.

University of Texas-Brownsville: I am seeking a MS-level graduate student to conduct research on the effects of different techniques used to restore coastal prairies and Tamaulipan Thornscrub communities in south Texas. Current restoration strategies involve the use of fire, herbicide, and mechanical treatments as well as planting of native species. Research will be largely field-based and conducted in the Laguna Atascosa Wildlife Refuge in south Texas, the primary habitat for the endangered ocelot and Aplomado Falcon. Research questions may include: 1) How long does it take plant communities to respond to different restoration techniques? 2) Is there a differential response among vegetation types? 3) Under what conditions do desired species respond most favorably? 4) Under what conditions do undesired species respond (including invasives)? The position will begin in spring 2013 in the Biological Sciences Department. The student will be employed as a teaching assistant and will be expected to work 8-9 hours/week as assistant instructor in undergraduate biology laboratory classes, assist his/her faculty teaching mentor with laboratory preparation and grading, and participate in departmental outreach events. Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree in biology, ecology, or a related field. Successful candidates must demonstrate an aptitude for research and ability to work independently. Prior experience in fieldwork related to plant and ecosystem ecology is preferred. The applicant must be field capable. A current, valid U.S. driver's license and good driving record is also preferred. The successful applicant will be expected to enroll full time in the UTB Biology Master’s program pursuing the thesis option. The available teaching assistantship has $1100 per month, is benefits eligible, and includes a waiver for in-state-tuition for out-of-state students. Additional summer salary is likely available. Please note that tuition is the student’s responsibility and is ~$2500/semester. Interested applicants should send to Dr. Heather Alexander (heather.alexander@utb.edu) a copy of their CV or resume, GPA and GRE scores, a written statement of graduate research interests, and contact information for two references. Review of applications will begin immediately. Posted: 9/27/12.

University of Texas-Brownsville: M.S. Position Available to Study Fire, Larch Trees, and C Dynamics in Siberia. I am seeking a MS-level graduate student to conduct research on fire, larch tree recruitment, and carbon dynamics in far northeastern Siberia. Research will include measurements of larch recruitment on experimental burn plots and across natural burn gradients, quantification of changes in permafrost characteristics following fire, and estimation of carbon pools in stands with varying fire histories. See the blog posts from the last summer’s field season in Siberia for more details. The position will begin in spring 2013 in the Biological Sciences Department. The student will be employed as a teaching assistant and will be expected to work 8-9 hours/week as assistant instructor in undergraduate biology laboratory classes, assist his/her faculty teaching mentor with laboratory preparation and grading, and participate in departmental outreach events. Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree in biology, ecology, or a related field. Successful candidates must demonstrate an aptitude for research and ability to work independently. Prior experience in fieldwork related to plant and ecosystem ecology is preferred. The applicant must be able to travel internationally and be field capable. A current, valid U.S. driver's license and good driving record is also preferred. The successful applicant will be expected to enroll full time in the UTB Biology Master’s program pursuing the thesis option. The available teaching assistantship has $1100 per month, is benefits eligible, and includes a waiver for in-state-tuition for out-of-state students. Additional summer salary is likely available. Please note that tuition is the student’s responsibility and is ~$2500/semester. Interested applicants should send to Dr. Heather Alexander (heather.alexander@utb.edu) a copy of their CV or resume, GPA and GRE scores, a written statement of graduate research interests, and contact information for two references. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Posted: 9/25/12.

University of Texas Marine Science Institute: I am seeking a Ph.D. student to work on a project examining the regional and local population structure of toxic Gambierdiscus dinoflagellates, the causative agents of ciguatera fish poisoning. This study is part of a larger, multi-investigator project that seeks to understand the diversity, physiology, and ecology of Gambierdiscus in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. The ideal candidate would have a background in marine science or molecular biology, and a strong interest in algal biology and genetics. The position is available to begin in June or September 2013 and is located at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, on the Gulf of Mexico coast. The assistantship includes an annual stipend, tuition support, and health care. Subsidized housing is also available for students. More information about applying: Graduate Degree Programs. Interested students should contact Dr. Deana Erdner (derdner@utexas.edu) before applying, and include a recent CV, including GRE/TOEFL scores. Posted: 11/16/12.

University of Toronto: PhD and MSc Positions in Population Dynamics and Conservation. The MK Lab in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology has openings at the MSc and PhD levels in the areas of population dynamics and conservation. Candidates should have a strong quantitative background and an interest in using mathematical and statistical models to understand population dynamics, with potential applications to conservation, fisheries, and epidemiology. Interested candidates should contact Martin Krkosek at martin.krkosek@gmail.com with a cover letter, cv, and unofficial transcripts. Posted: 12/3/12.

University of Twente: This four-year PhD position is offered in the department of Geo Information Processing, Faculty ITC at the University of Twente, the Netherlands, and is funded by the EU FP7 COMPLEX project. This research position is part of an EU FP7-funded project “Knowledge Based Climate Mitigation Systems for a Low Carbon Economy” (COMPLEX). In this project we will be exploring a generalized ‘socio-environmental model space’, which will include empirical models, conceptual models, complex computer simulations, and data sets describing ecological and socio-economic systems. The goal is to understand how information from more aggregated qualitative models can be transmitted to more elaborated and detailed quantitative simulations, and vice versa. We expect that by comparing the output from more complex models to what can be generated by simpler models and by studying models for structural sensitivity we can see what happens to system behavior observed in some simpler models (loss of equilibrium, tipping points, emergent properties, attractors, etc.), when more details are added to models and when some of these features become no longer evident in the model performance. Our second goal is to provide interoperability between the models and study how integrated models can be built from components. This research is a collaborative effort that includes faculty and students from 15 European partners, and requires good communication skills and work in a collaborative and interdisciplinary team, including work with stakeholders. This is an exciting opportunity to become part of a scientific network spanning countries and disciplines. Best consideration will be given to applications that come by 15 November 2012. See the full job ad for details and to apply. Posted: 11/12/12.

University of Vermont: Ph.D. position in forest climate change biogeochemistry with the Adair lab. Application Deadline: March 1, 2013. Potential Start Date: Summer 2013. The goal of the Northern Forest mesocosm climate change experiment is to quantify how climate warming will alter the ability of forests to retain and store C and nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P). The ability of forests to retain C and nutrients has important consequences for climate change mitigation, soil fertility and water quality. This position is funded to examine cabon and nutrient losses and retention in mesocosm soils and plant biomass, with a focus on microbial/soil processes. The student will be work to quantify and potentially model carbon/nutrient storage and fluxes. Duties will include writing a study plan, implementing sampling protocols, analyzing data, supervising technicians/undergraduate assistants, and preparing publications and presentations for scientific and lay audiences. Qualifications: The student should demonstrate a strong interest in biogeochemistry and climate change ecosystem ecology and have a BS/MS in ecology, environmental science, plant and soil science or a related field. In some cases, related work experience may substitute for prior academic experience. Experience with field or lab work, including microbial and soil analyses is highly desirable. Preference will be given to students with strong quantitative and modeling skills, including statistical analyses and programming in R. Interested applicants should submit the following: letter of interest, names and contact information of three references and CV to Dr. Carol Adair. Applicants will need to apply to the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources Graduate School before final acceptance. Posted: 2/4/13.

University of Vermont: Position: M.S. position in agricultural climate change mitigation (biogeochemistry). Application Deadline: March 1, 2013. Start Date: Summer 2013. Project: This long-term initiative works with farmers, agricultural service providers, researchers and community organizations to evaluate and implement on-farm climate change mitigation and adaptation practices. This position is funded to focus on quantifying the mitigation capacity of agricultural best management practices (BMPs) in terms of carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions. The student will work with Dr. Adair and the interdisciplinary Agricultural Resilience group to quantify carbon storage in and greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural BMPs throughout Vermont. Duties will include writing a study plan, implementing sampling protocols, analyzing data, supervising technicians/undergraduate assistants, and preparing publications and presentations for scientific and lay audiences. Qualifications: The student should demonstrate a strong interest in biogeochemistry and climate change ecosystem ecology and have a B.S. in ecology, environmental science, plant and soil science or a related field. In some cases, related work experience may substitute for prior academic experience. Training will be provided, but experience with field or lab work is highly desirable. While not required, preference will be given to students with strong quantitative skills, including statistical analyses and programming in R. Interested applicants should submit the following: letter of interest, names and contact information of three references and CV to Dr. Carol Adair. Applicants will need to apply to the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources Graduate School before final acceptance. Posted: 2/4/13.

University of Virginia: I am looking for a motivated individual wishing to pursue a MS or PhD studying population or landscape ecology of insects starting in the Fall of 2013. My students and I are currently studying forest-defoliating insects such as the gypsy moth, an invasive pest of eastern deciduous forests. Projects underway include investigation of 1) effects of climate change on outbreaks of forest insects; 2) drivers of spatial synchrony in outbreaks; 3) factors leading to geographic variation in the rate of gypsy moth invasion. Work in my lab often includes analysis of spatial datasets, field observations and experiments, and/or modeling. The successful candidate will have the option to pursue research in their own separate area of population or landscape ecology or may want to develop a project contributing to one of the investigations described above. Funding for the position would come from a research assistantship from University of Virginia’s Blandy Experimental Farm as well as a half-time teaching assistantship from the Department of Environmental Sciences. To apply, send a statement of interest, CV, and contact information for three references to Kyle Haynes (haynes@virginia.edu), Research Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, Associate Director, Blandy Experimental Farm. Posted: 8/15/12.

University of Washington: Ph.D. position studying methane oxidation around the roots of wetland plants. Starting September 2013, the Neumann lab at the University of Washington in Seattle has an opening for a Ph.D. student to work on a five-year funded project investigating methane oxidation in the soil zone surrounding roots of wetland plants and assessing how this process will change under future climate conditions. The project will involve multiple years of fieldwork in Alaska and laboratory investigations of field-collected samples. The hired student will have the opportunity to interface with a second Ph.D. student funded by the same project who will be modeling wetland methane emissions, and with other researchers across the UW campus and at the Alaskan field site who are experts in methane biogeochemistry and plant ecophysiology. More information about the position. If you are interested, please contact Rebecca Neumann (rbneum@uw.edu) with a cover letter, CV, statement of research interests and the names of three individuals able to provide a letter of recommendation. If mutual interest exists, the chosen student can be admitted to the Ph.D. program off cycle. Posted: 6/10/13.

University of Waterloo: Graduate position: Plant morphology, microclimate and insect dynamics. The successful applicant will develop equipment to measure microclimate at fine spatial scales, and measure plant microclimate impacts on aphid populations. The ideal candidate will combine experimental and computational approaches to produce powerful conclusions regarding insect dynamics in plant canopies. A background in either ecology related disciplines (e.g., agricultural science) or quantitative science (e.g, computer science) is required. To be considered, candidates must be eligible for admission to the Biology graduate program. Note: The latest start date for this position is September 2013. Applications must be received by May 1, 2013. Stipend: Candidates receive financial support through a combination of teaching and research stipend. Travel funds to attend scientific conferences are available. Contact: Dr. Kim Cuddington, Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Email: kcuddingATuwaterlooDOT.ca. Posted: 3/26/13.

University of Waterloo: Funding is available for a graduate student to create innovative models predicting whole community impacts of ecosystem engineers. To be considered, candidates must be eligible for admission to the Biology graduate program and a background in ecology or mathematics is preferred. Note: the latest start date for this position is September 2013. Application deadline is May 1, 2013. Stipend: Candidates receive financial support through a combination of teaching and research stipend. Travel funds to attend scientific conferences are available. Contact: Dr. Kim Cuddington, Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Email: kcuddingATuwaterlooDOT.ca. Posted: 3/26/13.

University of Waterloo: Funded graduate and undergraduate student RA positions in environmental psychology. The research is focused on an investigation of the motives for conservation behavior in private landowners. Most of the land in southern Ontario is in private hand and therefore the behavior of private landowners is critical for conservation initiatives. The work takes place in cooperation with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, which is interested in using the study results for evaluating and improving conservation incentive programs. Student RAs will be affiliated with the School of Planning in the Faculty of Environment at University of Waterloo. Faculty collaborators to the research are members of the departments of Environmental Resource Studies and Sociology & Legal Studies. Criteria for eligibility include the right to work in Canada (i.e., residency, work permit, Canadian citizenship or such). The expected start date for the graduate RA is September 2013 (or sooner) and for the undergraduate RAs summer 2013. Applications should include a cv, letter of intent, university transcripts and a list of 3 references. Please direct inquiries to: Michael Drescher, School of Planning, Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada. Email: mdresche-at-uwaterloo.ca. Posted: 1/24/13.

University of Western Australia: PhD Scholarship in the School of Plant Biology - Ecophysiology of a canker-affected eucalypt species. This PhD project is part of a larger ARC linkage project entitled: “Understanding the underlying causes and practical management solutions to marri (Corymbia calophylla) decline in the South West of Western Australia”. Marri is an iconic overstory eucalypt species which is widely distributed throughout the south-west of WA. Stem cankers on marri have been found to occur throughout SW Australia since the late 1960’s, with increasing rates of mortality attributed to cankers in the 1970’s and recommendations to urgently determine cause and effect and to develop options for disease control in the 1990’s. More recently it was shown that the incidence and severity of the disease was increasing and that large bleeding cankers on the trunk and branches were caused by a novel pathogen (Quambalaria coyrecup). Today more than 80% of trees of all age classes are infected in some areas by a range of Quambalaria species, with the potential for major economic, social and ecological implications. The increase in disease occurrence and severity is likely to be at least partly associated with the decreasing rainfall in the SW of Australia which has resulted in declining groundwater tables and severely drought-stressed ecosystems. We are seeking a highly motivated PhD student to determine how genotype and environment interact to influence plant condition and disease progression, and how disease affects plant condition. Drought stress will be of particular interest. Experimental work will involve glasshouse trials, common garden experiments as well as work in natural stands and will involve a range of techniques including measurements of gas-exchange, sapflow rates and water potential. A background in plant ecophysiology, with experience in plant water relations or in plant phytopathology is desirable. The successful candidate will work in close collaboration with other partners on the Linkage grant (i.e. at Murdoch University and the Department of Environment and Conservation) and will be part of the multidisciplinary state-funded Centre of Excellence for Climate Change Woodland & Forest Health. More information about the position and how to apply. For more information about the Centre of Excellence for Climate Change Woodland & Forest Health. Closing date is 20 July 2013. Posted: 6/21/13.

University of Western Australia: PhD scholarships available to work on a cutting-edge project on mineral nutrition of Australian Proteaceae species. Australian Proteaceae species are well adapted to living in low-phosphorus (P) acidic soils common to Australia. Some Proteaceae species that typically inhabit low-P acidic soils and avoid calcareous soils, can exhibit calcium toxicity when exposed to these calcium rich soils. The phenomenon of calcium toxicity has been known for decades, but no clear mechanistic explanation is available. We propose that calcium toxicity arises in Proteaceae because, unlike most dicots that store P in epidermal cells, these P-efficient plants store P in mesophyll cells, where calcium is also stored, leading to precipitation of P. Conversely, we hypothesise that calcium toxicity is avoided in soil-indifferent Proteaceae species by shifting accumulation of calcium from mesophyll cells to epidermal cells so as to prevent interference with efficient P utilisation. We are looking for highly motivated Australian or international PhD students to work on a project, which has a fieldwork component as well as glasshouse-based experiments, where physiological or molecular skills or electron microscopy expertise are essential. Since we anticipate several students to work on various aspects of this project, interested students need not have all the skills listed above. Australian citizens or residents should apply for an Australian Postgraduate Award in the first round in 2013; if successful, a top-up will be provided to work on the above project. International students should apply for an International Postgraduate Scholarship. If successful, a top-up will be provided to work on the above project. If international students secure a Scholarship for International Research Fees, a standard living allowance will be made available to work on the above project. For further details, please contact Professor Hans Lambers at: hans.lambers@uwa.edu.au. Posted: 12/11/12.

University of Western Sydney: Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment. Two PhD scholarships are available for active, dynamic individuals with expertise and interests in soil microbiology, carbon and greenhouse gas analyses, molecular microbial ecology and biodiversity-ecosystem function relations. SCHOLARSHIP 1 – MICROBIAL MODULATORS OF SOIL CARBON STORAGE This project focuses on the impact of microbial communities on soil aggregate size and their role in soil carbon storage. Supervisors: A/Prof Brajesh Singh and Prof Ian Anderson. SCHOLARSHIP 2 – ECOLOGICAL THEORY TO EXPLAIN MICROBIAL REGULATION OF SOIL FUNCTION This project will address the question of whether ecological theory developed for plants and animals explains microbial regulation of soil function. Supervisors: A/Prof Brajesh Singh and Prof Peter Reich. Each project will use a combination of cutting edge theoretical framework, functional assays and state-of-the-art molecular and metagenomic approaches. Candidates will be provided with extensive training in appropriate methodologies, in addition to statistics, scientific writing and presentation skills. CRITERIA The successful applicant should: » demonstrate excellent academic performance in a field related to the proposed research » hold qualifications and/or experience equivalent to an Australian First Class Bachelor Honours degree » be highly motivated to undertake further study at an advanced level » demonstrate the ability to organise and work independently International applicants must also demonstrate a high level of proficiency in the English language. SCHOLARSHIP PROVIDES » Tax free stipend of $34,653 per annum and a funded place in the doctoral degree. International candidates with a strong track record may be offered a tuition fee waiver. » Funding is also available for project costs and conference travel. MORE INFORMATION » Applicants should discuss their research aspirations and eligibility with Associate Professor Brajesh Singh before applying: b.singh@uws.edu.au, phone +61 2 4570 1329 » Contact the Office of Research Services to discuss enrollment and scholarships: HDRscholarships@uws.edu.au phone +61 2 4736 0966 » TO APPLY » Submit an application form, CV and one page research proposal that fits with the broad aims of the project as outlined above by 30 May 2013. Posted: 3/28/13.

University of Western Sydney: The Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment is seeking a PhD candidate to work on a project funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC). The PhD candidate is anticipated to commence mid-2013. Plant water use efficiency (WUE), the amount of carbon gained per unit water transpired, is a fundamental determinant of plant and ecosystem function. Controlled by stomatal behaviour, it governs plant productivity, ecosystem hydrology, and vegetation distribution. It has been frequently measured, at scales ranging from instantaneous leaf-level to annual ecosystem-scale. The task of the PhD candidate will be to collate major data sets across a wide range of scales, and interpret the data sets with a new model of WUE based on optimal behaviour of stomata. Specifically, the tasks are: 1) to collect and analyse leaf-level datasets on WUE, and/or 2) analyse existing ecosystem-scale flux measurements of CO2 and H2O from FLUXNET. See HIE Scholarships for more details, and instructions for applying. Contact: Remko Duursma (remkoduursma@gmail.com). The closing date is April 5th. Posted: 3/19/13.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: PhD Position: Assessing the long-term viability and management of prairie grouse populations and their vulnerability to environmental stressors. A PhD research assistantship is available to conduct occupancy surveys and develop population growth models for Sharp-tailed Grouse and Greater Prairie-Chickens that estimate demographic consequences under different management and climate change scenarios. Develop recommendations for landscape-scale habitat management that will provide the greatest chance of maintaining viable populations of both species throughout Wisconsin. Assess the distribution and extent of Sharp-tailed Grouse populations on non-managed land in the Northwest Sands Ecological Landscape. This project will be supported in the in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology and under the supervision of Dr. Benjamin Zuckerberg. Current annual stipend levels are $20,808 per year before taxes, plus tuition remission and health care benefits. Financial support is available for three years. The start date for the project is Sept. 1, 2013. Qualifications: A MS degree in environmental science, forestry, wildlife ecology, or other related disciplines is required. The preferred candidate will have experience in conducting field studies. Especially desirable are applicants with expertise in demographic modeling, population ecology, and GIS analyses. Applicants should have a background in collaborating with natural resource agencies and a high level of self-motivation. In addition, applicants should have a strong interest in developing quantitative skills and working with climate and remote sensing data products. Excellent writing and verbal communication skills, as well as the ability to work in a team, are essential. Driving license is required. Applications will be reviewed upon receipt and review will continue until candidates are chosen. The application deadline is May 17, 2013. Interested applicants are asked to e-mail the following documents listed below to our Student Services Coordinator Sara Rodock (rodock@wisc.edu) (in ONE PDF file only). Please specify in your letter when you would be available to start. Required Documents for the application: · The “Forest and Wildlife Ecology; UW-Madison Graduate Application Cover Sheet” (.doc) · A well-crafted cover letter outlining research interests, academic and professional backgrounds · Resume/CV · Copies of transcripts (unofficial copies acceptable at this point) · GRE and TOEFL (for international candidates) scores if available · Names and contact addresses of three references. Posted: 4/23/13.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: William Karasov’s laboratory seeks a motivated Ph.D. student interested in avian ecological immunology. Working as part of a team with other Department of Forest & Wildlife Ecology members (lab groups of Anna Pidgeon, Benjamin Zuckerberg) and colleagues at the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison (Dr. Eric Hofmeister), the graduate student will study variation in immune function in the annual cycle of birds living in forest fragments in WI, and its response to ecological variation in resource availability. Avian immune function plays a central role in theories in ecology and evolution and has important implications for avian conservation in future climate change scenarios and for animal and human health. We will test for differences in components of immune function in seed-eating birds with/without access to supplemental food, provided in feeders. These are immune features that are constitutive or inducible and nonspecific or specific; assays are tractable for use in free-living birds. Seasonal change in immune function of birds will be studied in relation to seasonal change in energy budgets, measured with doubly labeled water. Also, the student will test the reservoir competence of black-capped chickadees to West Nile Virus. Birds are reservoirs for many zoonotic and livestock pathogens, and we will increase knowledge about the likelihood of passerines serving as pathogen reservoirs, including birds in close association with humans and livestock in Wisconsin. Strong candidates will have some background/experience with field biology and animal physiology. Questions about the position should be directed to Professor Bill Karasov, wkarasov@wisc.edu. Position is available starting summer or fall 2013 and is a standard 50% research assistantship with a stipend (currently $20,400/year), tuition remission, and access to health benefits. Application process: Applications will be reviewed upon receipt and review will continue until candidates are chosen. The application deadline for students interested in a fall, 2013 start is March 18, 2013. Interested applicants are asked to e-mail the following documents listed below to our Student Services Coordinator Sara Rodock (rodock@wisc.edu) (in ONE PDF file please). Required Documents: - The “Graduate Application Cover Sheet” - A well-crafted cover letter outlining research interests, academic and professional backgrounds (1-2 pages) - Resume/CV - Copies of transcripts (unofficial copies acceptable at this point) - Names and contact addresses of three references. Posted: 2/14/13.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: A MS research assistantship is available to assess host plant resistance in cranberries by looking at varietal susceptibility to three of the major Lepidopteran cranberry pests. The study will involve laboratory rearing of insects, greenhouse growing of cranberry plants, and field studies. This study would involve assessing development rate of insects on different cranberry cultivars and wild varieties, population densities found in the field, assessing female fecundity and egg survival, and assessing plant damage. Details: Department of Entomology Graduate Training Opportunities. Deadline: 3/1/13. Posted: 1/31/13.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: The Lan lab seeks a motivated Ph.D. student interested in (a) identify potential resistant genes in imidacloprid resistant Colorado potato beetle populations in Wisconsin, (b) determine the prevalence of the resistant gene expression in the field populations, and (c) verify the role of each resistant gene in the resistant phenotype. We will use our findings to inform growers in strategizing the integrate pest management programs. For this position, we are in search of a student with a strong background in toxicology or physiology who is also interested in using molecular technologies/bioinformatics to identify and isolate targeted genes and quantify the levels of expression at the population scale. The research will involve mRNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RNAi to correlate specific gene to the resistant genotype in field populations of beetles. The student will matriculate in the Department of Entomology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Questions about the position should be directed to Professor Que Lan (qlan@entomology.wisc.edu). Position is available starting on or after September 1, 2013. The position is a standard 50% time research assistantship, with a stipend (currently $20,400/year), tuition remission, and access to health benefits. Interested applicants should follow the departmental application process instructions (specifically the application materials section) and indicate that they are interested in this specific position and Dr. Lan in their supplemental application. Applicants with questions about the admissions process should contact the departmental Student Services Coordinator, Sara Rodock (rodock@wisc.edu, 608.262.9926). Applications received by February 1, 2013 will be given preference for review. Posted: 12/14/12.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: A minimum of four years of funding is available in the Dept. of Forest & Wildlife Ecology to support graduate research, at the Ph.D. level, concerning the implications of triploidy for the physiological and chemical ecology of trembling aspen, a foundation species in boreal and montane forests of North America. Triploidy appears to be common in certain parts of aspen’s vast range—such as the Intermountain West—which points to a possible link between the demography of aspen ploidy and spatiotemporal variation in climate and associated environmental factors. It also begs the question as to how that link might be mediated by differences between triploid and diploid genotypes in life history traits. The graduate research assistant will assume primary responsibility for a collaborative project involving the labs of Eric Kruger (UW Forest & Wildlife Ecology), Rick Lindroth (UW Entomology), Liza Holeski (UW Entomology) and Karen Mock (Utah State, Wildland Resources). The research will entail comparisons of triploid and diploid aspen genotypes, in common-garden and controlled-climate experiments, with respect to inherent growth capacity, physiological and phytochemical ecology, and associated responses to biotic (e.g., herbivory) and abiotic (e.g., climate change) stresses. Qualifications: Highly motivated individuals with a strong academic background in plant biology and/or ecology, as well as excellent quantitative and communication skills, are encouraged to apply. Candidates must be able to work independently and as part of a collaborative research team. Stipend/benefits: A 50% Graduate Research Assistantship is available beginning in the fall of 2013. The RA currently provides a stipend of $20,400 (12 mo.), tuition waiver (minus segregated fees), and excellent medical/dental health plans. Interested candidates are asked to e-mail Graduate Student Services Coordinator Sara Rodock (rodock@wisc.edu) a single PDF file containing the following materials: - Coversheet (.doc) - Cover letter outlining research interests, academic and professional backgrounds - Resume - Copies of transcripts (unofficial copies) - Names and contact information for three references. Applications must be received by December 31, 2012, whereupon the most promising candidates will be requested to submit formal applications to one of two graduate programs: Zoology (Ecology) or Forest and Wildlife Ecology. Please direct questions about the position to Eric Kruger (elkruger@wisc.edu). Posted: 11/15/12.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: The Townsend lab in the department of Forest & Wildlife Ecology seeks a motivated Ph.D. student interested in the linkage of remote sensing with plant physiology. The work will involve use of imaging spectroscopy data (such as AVIRIS), thermal infrared imagery (such as MASTER) as well as data from multispectral sensors (Landsat, MODIS, VIIRS), in addition to field measurements. The position is associated with multi-investigator projects examining the capacity of remote sensing to measure the photosynthetic capacity of both natural and agricultural ecosystems, and how these properties vary with environmental drivers. Ultimately, we plan to use our findings to develop methods to incorporate data from forthcoming remote sensing instruments to improve modeling of ecosystem response to environmental change. For this position, we are in search of a student with a strong background in plant biology or ecology who is also interested in using remote sensing technologies to quantify physiological aspects of plant growth, especially as they relate to variations in climate. The research will involve the linkage of field measurements of photosynthesis and physiological status to remote sensing and ecosystem models, in addition to development of methods to map landscape pattern from remote sensing data. Questions about the position should be directed to Professor Phil Townsend, ptownsend@wisc.edu. Position is available starting on or after July 1, 2013. The position is a standard 50% time research assistantship, with a stipend (currently $20,808/year), tuition remission (minus segregated fees), and access to health benefits. Qualifications: A MS degree in environmental science, ecology, biology, geography, forestry, or other related discipline is required. Applicants with a BS degree will only be considered if substantial relevant experience can be shown. A solid working knowledge of remote sensing, GIS, and statistics is required. Programming or scripting experience (e.g., in R, Python, IDL or Matlab) is beneficial. Good English writing and verbal communication skills, as well as the ability to work in a team, are essential. Deadline for application is April 15, 2013. To apply, e-mail the following documents to Student Services Coordinator Sara Rodock (rodock@wisc.edu) (in ONE PDF file). Please specify in your letter when you would be available to start. - The Cover Sheet (doc) - A well-crafted cover letter outlining research interests, academic and professional backgrounds - Resume/CV - Copies of transcripts (unofficial copies acceptable at this point) - GRE scores if available (TOEFL if applicable) - Names and contact addresses of three references. Posted: 10/4/12, revised: 3/5/13.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: PhD Research Assistantship in Terrestrial Food Web Ecology. We are looking for a motivated student interested in pursuing a PhD as part of the Gratton Lab studying the interactions between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems (ecosystem linkages). This work takes place at a biologically rich and scenic area in northeast Iceland, centered on Lake Myvatn. An ideal candidate needs to have a solid background in biology or ecology, have some prior research or field experience, and be able work in Iceland for summer field work. Candidates should have interests in arthropod food web ecology, community ecology, aquatic-terrestrial linkages, linkages between below- and above-ground food webs and/or the role of arthropods in ecosystem processes. This research is part of a broad collaborative effort including Claudio Gratton (Entomology), Tony Ives (Zoology), Randy Jackson (Agronomy), Phil Townsend (Forestry and Wildlife Ecology), and Jake Vander Zanden (Center for Limnology/Zoology) at the University of Wisconsin. Students will be applying through the Zoology program. Graduate support would include a mix of research and teaching assistantships. To apply, please complete this cover sheet and send this with a cover letter outlining research interests, prior experiences and why you want to go to graduate school and join our group, CV, and names of 3 references as a single pdf file to Claudio Gratton (cgratton@wisc.edu). Deadline: 1 October 2012. If you are planning on attending the 2012 ESA Meeting in Portland, OR, we can try to schedule a meeting there. More details. Posted: 7/17/12.

University of Wyoming: We are recruiting two students (Ph.D. and M.S.) to pursue the Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management degree in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management. Research will investigate the consequences of plant genotype-by-habitat interactions for the restoration of western shrublands in Wyoming and the Colorado Front Range. Applications are encouraged from prospective candidates with a background and interest in restoration ecology, plant biology and population genetics. Evidence of excellent written and communication skills and enthusiasm for field and laboratory research are a plus. Applicants to the Ph.D. program at the University of Wyoming should have completed a Master’s degree. In rare cases, we will accept a Ph.D. student without an M.S. Graduate support includes stipend, tuition and research funding for three years and there will be opportunities to apply for additional funding. We are interested to fill these positions as soon as possible. Please send inquiries and questions to Kristina Hufford at khufford@uwyo.edu to initiate an application for study. Applications will consist of a cover letter and copies of transcripts, GRE scores, resume and 3 letters of reference. More information about application to the UW graduate program. Posted: 3/8/13.

University of Wyoming: Ph.D. assistantship available for the study of ecological genetic and landscape approaches to plant community restoration. Research will investigate genotype-environment interactions relevant for plant establishment at restoration sites in high elevation ecosystems. Prospective students with a background in natural resources, ecology, and/or population genetics are encouraged to apply. Qualifications should include a strong academic record and interest in ecological restoration. Evidence of excellent written and analytical skills, as well as enthusiasm for field and laboratory research will be a plus. The assistantship includes a generous annual stipend, tuition and fees, health insurance and research support for three years. To apply, send application materials, including a cover letter and copies of transcripts, GRE scores, resume and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Kristina Hufford: khufford@uwyo.edu. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Please contact K. Hufford with any questions. Posted: 9/25/12.

University of Wyoming: We are seeking a student to work on a research project exploring responses of big sagebrush ecosystems to changing conditions including climate change and competition with invasive species, here cheatgrass. The project will combine process-based and statistical simulation models of soil water and regeneration processes to investigate vegetation responses under future conditions (our paper, Schlaepfer et al. 2012 Ecography, describes a similar study approach). The successful candidate will be a member of the Lauenroth/Burke lab at the Department of Botany, will collaborate with a USGS researcher, and will interact with researchers at the North-Central Climate Science Center. The successful candidate is a highly motivated and self-reliant student with a bachelor degree in ecology or a related field with considerable programming and modeling experiences. The student could participate in the inter-departmental Program of Ecology (PiE). For further details or questions, please contact Daniel Schlaepfer (dschlaep@uwyo.edu). If you are interested in this opportunity, please include a letter of motivation and your CV. Posted: 8/9/12.

University of Zürich: PhD position in biodiversity-effects on vegetation–atmosphere interactions. We are seeking a highly motivated PhD candidate in the field of biogeosciences, ecosystem ecology, biodiversity research, or atmospheric sciences. The successful candidate will investigate mechanisms by which landscape-level diversity affects vegetation-atmosphere interactions and ecosystem functioning by combining remotely-sensed data with biodiversity inventories and geographical information. This PhD thesis will be part of the newly established interdisciplinary priority programme "Global Change and Biodiversity". This programme targets the role of biodiversity both as a driver and response to global change, and encompasses contributions from two faculties and five institutes of the University of Zürich. Applicants should own a university degree in ecology, environmental sciences, or a related topic. We are looking for a highly motivated, enthusiastic and independent person with a passion for science to join our team. We offer outstanding working conditions, a high quality of life in Zurich, and an excellent supporting environment. Applicants are expected to have good numerical skills. Literacy in programming also is an asset. A good standard of written and spoken English is essential. Employment is for 3 years, starting on January 1, 2014. The successful applicant will be supervised by Pascal Niklaus and Gabriela Schaepman-Strub (main supervisors) as well as Bernhard Schmid and Michael Schaepman (faculty members). Further information about our research groups and the university can be found under Soil Ecology & Global Change and Spatial Ecology & Remote Sensing. Please send your application (including position reference URPP-GCB-311-2) as a single PDF file (motivation letter, complete CV, transcript/grades of MSc and names of 2 references) to Rita.Ott@geo.uzh.ch, no later than September 15, 2013. For further questions, please contact Pascal.Niklaus@ieu.uzh.ch. Posted: 6/26/13.

University of Zürich: two biodemography PhD positions are available in our Population Ecology Research Group. PhD position #1 will take the lead on the analysis of long-term data from a set of mammalian populations (with possibility to contribute to fieldwork on Alpine marmots, yellow-bellied marmots, and meerkats), whereas PhD position #2 will take the lead on experimental test of theory using laboratory microcosms of rotifers and soil mites, and design, conduct and analyse data from these experiments. Throughout their degree, both students will work with advanced statistical models to investigate nonlinear relationships between traits and life history rates, and with trait-based population models (e.g., IPMs) to investigate the links between phenotypic trait and population dynamics. Further details of these positions. Screening of applicants will start on May 31th, 2013. Posted: 5/3/13.

University of Zürich: We have a 3-year SNF-funded PhD position available in our group at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Switzerland: "From understanding to predicting: Giant tortoises as drivers of the seed dispersal network of Aldabra". The Aldabra Atoll in the Western Indian Ocean is home to 100,000 giant tortoises (Aldabrachelys gigantea) – the largest surviving population of giant tortoises in the world. The project aims at dramatically improving our understanding of the role of the giant tortoises as seed dispersers. We will investigate multiple levels of ecological organisation, from individual behaviour and the outcome of pairwise interactions, to community-level interaction patterns. The project has three components: 1) developing a theoretical individual-based model of seed dispersal by giant tortoises and experimentally field-testing its predictions by radio tracking artificial ingestible seeds, 2) constructing the seed dispersal network of Aldabra (camera trapping, fecal analyses), and 3) experimentally evaluating the effect of tortoise gut passage on seed germination and seedling establishment. The preferred starting date is mid-2013, and applicants should have or expect to obtain an MSc (or equivalent) in a relevant field. Review of applications starts on 01 November 2012, but candidates will be considered until the position is filled. More information and application details (pdf). Posted: 10/2/12.

Utah State University: I seek applications for a MS-level graduate research assistantship to conduct research on the interactions between an invasive coqui frog and native bird communities in Hawaii. The successful applicant will be expected to: (a) start the MS program in either August 2013 or December 2013; (b) conduct a nine-month field survey while living in Hawaii, taking the lead on all logistics staring in December 2013; (c) collect, analyze, and interpret data from the field experiment in year 2; and (d) write thesis chapters and publications based on the results. Competitive candidates will be expected to have: (a) a BS degree in a relevant discipline; (b) strong field experience related to the project in the areas of bird biology, previous field experience in Hawaii or on other Pacific Islands would be a plus; (c) strong interest in community and invasion ecology; (d) evidence of success in previous projects; and (e) meet minimum requirements for entry into USU’s Graduate Program: a cumulative 3.0 GPA and 40th percentile on GRE, but the most competitive applicants will exceed these minimums. The home department is Wildland Resources in the College of Natural Resources at USU. A stipend of $15k including medical insurance is guaranteed for two years. The student will be expected to pursue supplemental funding from internal and external sources as well as serve as a teaching assistant for one semester over the 2 years. Prospective students should contact Dr. Karen Beard (karen.beard@usu.edu) for more information: please include a current resume with GPA and GRE scores, information for three references, and statement of research interests with your inquiry. Posted: 6/28/13.

Utah State University: Two positions: (1) Forest Demography: I am seeking applications for a graduate student at either the MS or PhD level looking to work in large forest demography plots - the Yosemite Forest Dynamics Plot, the Wind River Forest Dynamics Plot, and the naissant Utah Forest Dynamics Plot, all affiliated with the Smithsonian CTFS global network of forest plots. This position can involve studies of woody species demography, diversity, productivity, vertical and horizontal structure, or disturbance. This opening is at Utah State University, where I will be joining the faculty in autumn of 2013. Andrew Larson (University of Montana) is a collaborator on this project. When enquiring, please include sufficient information to begin a dialog (at a minimum, your CV, an unofficial transcript, and GRE scores). Please also read some of my publications and those of my collaborators on related topics. The minimum GRE scores required for admission to Utah State University are the 40th percentile. But because our work in fire ecology, landscape ecology, and community ecology is computationally and quantitatively intense, I prefer students with good quantitative backgrounds (science, math, or engineering), and quantitative GRE scores above the 85th percentile (although that is certainly not a requirement). Our work environment includes R for statistics, MySQL for database work, ESRI for GIS and remote sensing, ENVI for spectral remote sensing, FUSION for LiDAR remote sensing, and Trimble and Leica for surveying. Any experience with those tools is great but not required. Paradoxically, field experience is not a requisite for application, but you will ! probably be doing a lot of it (I provide considerable in-the-field training for my students). My objective is to work as a partner with students to produce significant work, publishable in high quality journals. (2) Fire Severity: I am seeking applications for a graduate student at the MS level to join an ongoing project examining patterns of fire severity and their relations to climate variability ("Disappearing refugia: identifying trends and resilience in unburned islands under climate change"). This opening is at Utah State University, where I will be joining the faculty in autumn of 2013. Crystal Kolden (University of Idaho) is a collaborator on this project. When enquiring, please include sufficient information to begin a dialog (at a minimum, your CV, an unofficial transcript, and GRE scores). Please also read some of my publications and those of my collaborators on related topics. The minimum GRE scores required for admission to Utah State University are the 40th percentile. But because our work in fire ecology, landscape ecology, and community ecology is computationally and quantitatively intense, I prefer students with good quantitative backgrounds (science, math, or engineering), and quantitative GRE scores above the 85th percentile (although that is certainly not a requirement). Our work environment includes R for statistics, MySQL for database work, ESRI for GIS and remote sensing, ENVI for spectral remote sensing, FUSION for LiDAR remote sensing, and Trimble and Leica for surveying. Any experience with those tools is great but not required. Paradoxically, field experience is not a requisite for application, but you will probably be doing a lot of it (I provide considerable in-the-field training for my students). My objective is to work as a partner with students to produce significant work, publishable in high quality journals. Contact: From autumn semester: James A Lutz, Assistant Professor, Forest Ecology, Utah State University. Current email: jlutz@uw.edu. Posted: 6/21/13.

Utah State University: Evaluating Ecosystem Services in Coupled Human-Natural Systems, A PhD-level fellowship is available in the Department of Watershed Sciences. This fellowship opportunity will start in Fall 2013 (preferred) or Spring 2014 and is part of a multi-year, NSF-funded iUTAH project aimed at understanding water resources sustainability in Utah’s urbanizing Wasatch Front (see www.iutahepscor.org). We seek a motivated, independent, and dynamic doctoral student to quantify and value ecosystem services in coupled human-natural western water systems. The successful applicant will: 1. Quantify and value supporting (e.g., nutrient cycling), provisioning (e.g., water supply), regulating (e.g., water purification, flood regulation), and cultural (e.g., aesthetic, recreation) hydrologic ecosystem services in Utah’s Wasatch Front, 2. Complete field data collection of hydrologic ecosystem services, 3. Develop a systems model (optimization and/or simulation) to represent current supply and demand of ecosystem services, as well as future impacts from land use change, population growth, and hydroclimatic change, and 4. Work collaboratively with other researchers to ensure that developed ecosystem service model components are aligned both holistically and in time and space with other project work. Requirements • Candidates should have (or expect to complete prior to admission) a masters degree in watershed sciences, ecology, hydrology, physical geography, civil and/or environmental engineering, economics, mathematics or a related discipline, • Strong quantitative analysis and computer skills (modeling and/or programming), • An interest in managing water resources for people and ecosystems. Prospective students should send a current curriculum vitae, GRE scores, statement of research interests, and reference contact information to Dr. Sarah Null (sarah.null@usu.edu). The home department for this student will be Watershed Sciences (in the Aquatic Habitat, Climate & Water Analysis Lab), although this student will be expected to work in an interdisciplinary, multi-institution team of faculty and students. This fellowship includes full doctoral research fellowship support ($20k/yr) plus tuition for three years while completing research on this project. There will be opportunities to pursue supplemental funding from internal and external sources in future years. Posted: 5/29/13.

Utah State University:-Biology seeks a highly qualified and motivated individual wishing to pursue a graduate degree in the area of applied entomology and insect pathology for 2013. The successful applicant will investigate billbug biology and ecology in the Intermountain West and study the interactions between entomopathogenic nematodes and water conservation strategies for billbug suppression. Required qualifications include a background in entomology, ecology, plant sciences, or related field, experience with field research, exposure to statistics, and an ability to work in a collaborative environment. The graduate assistantship includes an annual stipend of ~$23K/year. To apply, send an email to Dr. Ricardo Ramirez (ricardo.ramirez@usu.edu). Please provide a CV/resume (include GPA and GRE scores), a statement of purpose, and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. See also: Center for Water Efficient Landscaping and the USU Ecology Center. Posted: 1/8/13.

Utah State University/University of Utah/Brigham Young University: Several PhD-level graduate fellowship opportunities are available as part of a NSF-funded, multi-year study aimed at understanding water resources sustainability in Utah’s urbanizing Wasatch Front (iUTAH). The students will be expected to work in an interdisciplinary, cross-institutional research team that includes researchers from Brigham Young University, the University of Utah, and Utah State University. Faculty from these institutions are likely committee members and potential co-advisors. Potential students should have completed a MS degree in a related science discipline, but candidates with BS degrees and research experience also will be considered. 1. Plant ecophysiology- The College of Life Sciences at Brigham Young University invites applications for a PhD-level graduate research fellowship in plant physiological ecology and water relations in alpine/sub-alpine trees. The doctoral student may earn their PhD through either the Biology or Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation doctoral programs depending on their area of focus. Prospective students should contact Dr. Richard Gill (rgill@byu.edu) or Dr. Sam St. Clair (stclair@byu.edu) by email for further information about this opportunity and include a current resume and a statement of research interests. Deadlines for applications to the Ph.D. programs are January 15 for Biology and February 1 for Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation. 2. Aquatic microbial ecology - The College of Life Sciences at Brigham Young University, seeks two PhD candidates in the areas of river water quality and microbial ecology Potential graduate research themes include: aquatic microbial community ecology in montane and urban systems; microbial diversity effects on water quality, nutrient dynamics and/or pathogen loading, ecological significance of functional redundancy or dormancy across environmental gradients; and/or microbial responses to altered ecohydrology due to climate or land use change. Prospective students should contact Dr. Zachary Aanderud (zachary_aanderud@byu.edu) by email for further information about this opportunity and include a current resume with three references and a statement of research interests. Application deadline is January 15th 2013. 3. Climate Modeling – The Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Utah invites applications for a Ph.D.-level graduate student fellowship focusing on how climate and land use change impact availability and demand for montane water resources. The successful applicant will use observations and models to improve projections of water quantity and quality under various climate change and urbanization scenarios. Applicants should have experience using existing modeling techniques for driving regional-scale hydrologic processes with large-scale climate projections (e.g., statistical or dynamical downscaling), and the ability to develop and validate new numerical modeling frameworks. Modeling will enable testing of hypotheses about the hydrologic cycle’s sensitivity to snowmelt dynamics, runoff generation, infiltration, evapotranspiration, and deep percolation as a function of elevation, microclimate, and land cover. Prospective students should contact Dr. Court Strong (court.strong@utah.edu) for more information; please include a current resume and statement of research interests with your inquiry. Application deadline is January 15, 2013. 4. Ecosystem Ecology/Biogeochemistry - The Department of Biology at Utah State University invites applications for a PhD-level graduate research fellowship in ecosystem ecology/biogeochemistry. Potential graduate research themes include aquatic-terrestrial interactions and influences on nutrient dynamics/solute transport; aquatic ecosystem responses to urbanization, altered ecohydrology, and/or climate change; modeling and interpretation of real-time aquatic sensor data on mountain-to-urban gradients. The incumbent may choose to earn their degree in Biology or in Ecology. Prospective students should contact Dr. Michelle Baker (michelle.baker@usu.edu) or Dr. Bethany Neilson (bethany.neilson@usu.edu) for more information; please include a current resume and statement of research interests with your inquiry. Application deadline is January 15, 2013. Posted: 12/20/12.

Utah State University: PhD student opening, savanna/rangeland ecology (Aug 2013). I am recruiting a student interested in pursuing a PhD in ecology. My research emphases include livestock-wildlife-plant interactions, plant community ecology, restoration ecology, and rangeland ecology and management. The student’s PhD work will be conducted in association with the Kenya Long-term Exclosure Experiment (KLEE), a long-term, large-scale experiment designed to investigate effects of native and domestic herbivores on savanna dynamics in East Africa. The PhD student will have room to develop his/her own research project related to my research and KLEE project goals. The KLEE project is located in the wildlife-rich central highlands of Kenya at the Mpala Research Centre, a world class research facility. USU has a strong natural resources program, and its location in the beautiful Cache Valley provides easy access to world class outdoor recreation. Students can earn degrees through the Department of Wildland Resources or the Ecology Center. Interested students should have a degree in ecology, biology, soil science, natural resources, or a related field. Students must be prepared to work in remote field conditions. Past independent field research experience and evidence of excellent written communication skills are strongly recommended. Minimum requirements for entry into USU’s Graduate Program are a cumulative 3.0 GPA and 40th percentile on GRE, but the most competitive applicants will exceed these minimums. Candidates must apply to both USU’s School of Graduate Studies and the S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney Ph.D. Fellowships Program. Before beginning the formal USU application process potential students should send 1) a letter of interest and qualifications, 2) CV, 3) unofficial transcripts, 4) GRE scores, and 5) contact information for three references to Dr. Kari E. Veblen (kari.veblen@usu.edu). Review of applications will begin Dec 1 and continue until the position is filled. Posted: 11/12/12.

Utah State University: The White Lab has an opening for a graduate student with interests in global ecology, macroecology, community ecology, or ecological theory/modeling. Active areas of research in the White lab include broad scale patterns related to biodiversity, abundance and body size, ecological dynamics, and the use of sensor networks for studying ecological systems. We use computational, mathematical, and advanced statistical methods in much of our work, so students with an interest in these kinds of methods are encouraged to apply. Background in these quantitative techniques is not necessary, only an interest in learning and applying them. While students interested in one of the general areas listed above are preferred, students are encouraged to develop their own research projects related to their interests. The White Lab is part of Weecology an interdisciplinary ecology research group whose goal is to facilitate the broad training of ecologists in areas from field work to quantitative methods. Students with broad interests are jointly trained in an interdisciplinary setting. We are looking for students who want a supportive environment in which to pursue their own ideas. Graduate students are funded through a combination of research assistantships, teaching assistantships, and fellowships. Students interested in pursuing a PhD are preferred. For additional information about the position and Utah State University see the full ad. Interested students can find more information about our group by checking out the the White Lab and Weecology websites, our code repositories, our blog, and Twitter. Interested students should contact Dr. Ethan White (ethan.white@usu.edu) by December 1st, 2012 with their CV, GPA, GRE scores (if available), and a brief statement of research interests. Posted: 10/30/12, revised: 11/6/12.

Utah State University: I am seeking a PhD student to work on applied and fundamental questions in behavior, demography, population ecology, and life history evolution of black bears. The aim of this project is to help guide black bear conservation by linking bear behavior to habitat selection, individually-based demography, and population dynamics using state-of-the-art statistical and modeling tools. The selected PhD student will work on 30+ years of high quality, individual-based black bear data (i.e., behavior, movement, and demography) from the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife ‘NJDFW’. This dataset offers the possibility to address applied questions and management solutions directed at mitigating bear-wildlife conflicts. It also conveys the possibility to address basic research questions by relating individual performance and fitness to environmental and anthropogenic change in New Jersey; the state with the highest density of black bears in the country. The combination of applied and basic research is the approach I favor in my lab. It should be noted that even though the student will be working on an existing dataset, the student will also have to possibility to participate in field work each year with NJDFW (summer bear captures and winter den searches). All interested candidates must apply to both USU’s School of Graduate Studies, and the S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney Doctoral Fellowships Program. These fellowships will cover 75% of all expenses (stipend, tuition, health insurance) over 4 years. Matching funds (remaining 25%) have already been secured, which is a sine qua non condition for a successful application. Requirements: Minimum requirements for a successful application are a cumulative 70th percentile (for both verbal and quantitative) on GRE and cumulative GPA of > 3.5. Note that although 70th percentile scores are not required for the Quinney fellowships, nominees without these scores will be at a distinct disadvantage. Paper(s) in peer-reviewed journals and manuscripts at advanced stages of preparation will considerably help your application. The Phd student will receive his/her degree through the department of Wildland Resources or the Ecology Center. The student will work in my lab (Dr Lise Aubry) in collaboration with Dr Melissa Reynolds-Hogland (head of bear trust international) and the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife. To apply, please email me a CV, copy of your transcripts, one-page statement of research interests, and contact information for two references at lise.aubry@aggiemail.usu.edu by 12/1/2012. Out of the pool of applicants, I will select the top two candidates to move forward with the fellowship application process which will need to be completed by 1/25/2013. Anticipated start date: summer-fall 2013. Posted: 10/30/12.

Utah State University: The Quinney College of Natural Resources (QCNR) will award 3 Ph.D. Fellowships for new students beginning Summer/Fall 2013. Fellowships include 4 years of support at $20k per year, tuition, and research expenses. Successful applicants can work with any faculty member in the departments of Environment and Society, Watershed Sciences, and Wildland Resources. Review of Fellowship applications will be based on both the quality of the student’s application materials as well as clear evidence of strong support from a faculty advisor. The faculty advisor must (1) demonstrate a commitment to mentoring the student to successful completion and (2) document how the applicant will fit into and contribute to the professor’s research program. Thus, these Fellowships will be awarded to a student-faculty team rather than simply to the student. Interested students should contact potential faculty advisors soon. The advisor must submit completed applications by 25 January 2013 for a student to be guaranteed consideration. A complete application will include: 1) a letter of interest from the student applicant, 2) a letter of strong support from the major advisor, 3) a current Curriculum Vitae from the student applicant, and 4) a completed graduate school application. For more information contact Geno Schupp (eugene.schupp@usu.edu) or a potential faculty advisor in the QCNR. Posted: 10/26/12.

Utah State University: I am recruiting a student interested in pursuing an MS in ecology. The project, conducted in collaboration with the USDA-ARS, is aimed at increasing our understanding of shrubland ecology and developing shrubland management guidelines for northern Utah. The project includes replicated plot-level and landscape-scale treatments and is based on the ecological site framework developed by the NRCS. The candidate will be responsible for conducting his/her own independent field project that complements the overall project goals and assisting in development of shrubland management guidelines. USU has a strong natural resources program, and its location in the beautiful Cache Valley provides easy access to world class outdoor recreation. Students can earn degrees through the Department of Wildland Resources or the Ecology Center. Students should have a degree in ecology, biology, soil science, natural resources, or a related field. Past field experience and evidence of excellent written communication skills are required. It is vital that the candidate be able to work effectively both independently and as part of a field team. Minimum requirements for entry into USU’s Graduate Program are a cumulative 3.0 GPA and 1100 combined GRE scores. Potential students should send 1) a letter of interest and qualifications, 2) CV, 3) unofficial transcripts, 4) GRE scores, and 5) contact information for three references to Dr. Kari E. Veblen (kari.veblen@usu.edu). Anticipated start date is Jan, 2013. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Posted: 9/27/12.

Utah State University: I am seeking a PhD student interested in studying coexistence and/or climate change impacts on semi-arid plant communities. At least four years of full funding is available. During the first year, the student will lead a field study to describe patterns of soil water use in dominant plants of the sagebrush steppe. After the first year, the student will have complete freedom to develop independent research. Work in my lab often combines long-term observational data, experiments, and models. To apply, please email me (peter.adler@usu.edu) a statement of interest, a CV, and contact information for three references. I will give special consideration to applications from women and minorities. Posted: 8/2/12, revised: 11/6/12.

Utrecht University: Doctoral scholarship Plant Ecophysiology. Project: Molecular mechanisms driving post-flooding recovery in plants. Natural plant ecosystems and crops in low-lying farmlands are extremely vulnerable to floods. Remarkable progress has been achieved towards understanding how plants respond to and survive flooding. However, a largely overlooked aspect is the period after submergence. Most plants die after the floodwaters have receded even if they survived the submergence stress itself. Post-submergence recovery is, therefore, an important aspect of flooding tolerance. However, the causes of the high mortality and why some plants can survive this phase better than others are largely unknown. This PhD project will be geared towards identifying and characterising post-submergence regulatory mechanisms in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of physiological, molecular and biochemical approaches. The applicant should have: - Masters in plant biology or life sciences - Willingness to learn and develop new methods, to demonstrate initiative and responsibility, and to work in an interdisciplinary team. - Sufficient English oral, written and presentation skills. - Bioinformatics experience (Desirable but not essential). What we offer: The PhD student will be placed at the Plant Ecophysiology group within the Graduate Scool Life Sciences. You can expect to work with a highly ambitious, creative and international team of PhD students, post-docs, tenured staff and research assistants and make use of state-of-the-art facilities and cutting-edge research tools. Dutch language skills are not required. A PhD scholarship is available for international knowledge exchange. The scholarship (with a maximum €1.400 per month during the PhD education period) will be granted for one year and can be extended up to a total period of maximum 4 years. The scholarship can also be granted in addition to a scholarship from the home country. Applications should include: - A cover letter or brief statement explaining why you are interested in this scholarship. - Your curriculum vitae. - A copy of the highest academic degree certificate. - A list of courses (including marks) followed during your BSc and MSc programmes. - Two academic references. Closing date for applications is 1st March, 2013. Complete Applications should be submitted preferably by e-mail to: Dr. Rashmi Sasidharan (r.sasidharan@uu.nl) or Prof. L.A.C.J. Voesenek (l.a.c.j.voesenek@uu.nl). Posted: 11/28/12.

Vancouver Island University: I (Sarah Dudas) am recruiting 1-2 graduate students (MSc or PhD) to join the Ecological Interactions Research Program at the Centre for Shellfish Research and Deep Bay Marine Field station. My interests include ecosystem interactions, shellfish population dynamics, invertebrate larval dispersal, biological oceanography, climate change, non-indigenous species, conservation and sustainability. Over the next few years my lab will be conducting several research projects to investigate how shellfish aquaculture activities influence the ecosystem in which they occur. These activities provide 'experiments of opportunity', altering the ecosystem (e.g. the addition of filter feeders) in ways that allow us to answer interesting ecological questions, while at the same time addressing industry issues to work towards sustainable development. Specifically, I am looking for students to investigate 1) the influence of deep water shellfish aquaculture activities on oceanography, phytoplankton, zooplankton and potentially fish communities and 2) the influence of aquaculture structures (e.g. fencing and netting in the intertidal, rafts in deep water) on the distribution of higher trophic levels (e.g. crabs, sea stars, fish). I am looking for students that are enthusiastic, self-motivated and comfortable working on, in and around the water. Prospective students should be competitive for NSERC scholarships and students that end up joining the lab will be expected to pursue other scholarship opportunities throughout their degree. Students should be able to work independently under my guidance and supervision but to effectively act as their own 'project leader'. Students will also be expected to present their findings at scientific conferences and publish them in peer-reviewed journals. If you're interesting in joining the lab please send an email with an attached cover letter outlining your research interests and why you're interested in this opportunity, along with a CV and transcript copies to Sarah.Dudas@viu.ca. Posted: 9/18/12.

Virginia Tech: Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Fluxes along the Hillslope-Riparian-Stream Continuum in Response to Cellulosic Biofuel Systems. The Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation and the Virginia Water Resources Research Center are seeking applicants for a graduate research assistantship position in Forest Biogeochemistry and Hydrology at the M.S. level. An applicant is sought for research on factors controlling soil carbon and nitrogen fluxes along the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum created by a series of cellulosic biofuel production systems involving varying mixtures of loblolly pine and switchgrass at established, instrumented sites in northwestern Alabama. This is part of an ongoing collaborative research project with the North Carolina State University, University of Georgia, USFS Southern Research Station, and Weyerhaeuser Company to study effects of alternative cellulosic biofuel management systems on productivity, biogeochemistry and hydrology in the southeastern US. Position is available beginning August 2013 or January 2014. M.S. research assistantships in the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation pay excellent annual stipends ($19-20k) and include a full tuition waiver and a health insurance premium subsidy. Minimum qualifications include: a B.S. degree in forestry, soil science, ecology, watershed management, hydrology, or a related natural resources field; good written and oral communication skills; and willingness to conduct field research under sometimes demanding conditions in the southeastern US. For more information contact: Dr. Stephen H. Schoenholtz (Stephen.Schoenholtz@vt.edu, (540) 231-0711) or Dr. Kevin J. McGuire (Kevin.McGuire@vt.edu, (540) 231-6017). Posted: 6/28/13.

Virginia Tech: Graduate assistantships in forest ecosystem ecology and global change. The Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation seeks applicants for graduate research assistantships at the Masters or Ph.D. level, starting August 2013 or January 2014. Research will focus on how Southeastern U.S. forests can be managed to mitigate climate change and will broadly link the efforts of the Pine Integrated Network: Education, Mitigation, and Adaptation Project (PINEMAP) to the Community Earth System Model. Students with quantitative training and backgrounds in ecology, forestry, or environmental sciences are encouraged to apply. Students will have the opportunity to be involved in new university-wide graduate training programs in global change and remote sensing. For more information contact Dr. Quinn Thomas (rqthomas@vt.edu). Posted: 2/19/13.

Virginia Tech: Graduate Research Assistantship in Climate Change and Forest Carbon Dynamics. The Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation is seeking applicants for a USDA-funded PhD-level graduate research assistantship with an expected start date of fall of 2013. Research will focus on understanding the different biotic contributions (i.e., heterotrophs vs. autotrophs) to soil respiration in response to climate change and forest management. This research is part of a large, multi-institution, multi-disciplinary research program broadly aimed at managing forests to increase carbon sequestration; increase efficiency of nitrogen and other fertilizer inputs; and adapt forest management approaches to increase forest resilience and sustainability under variable climates. For more information on the larger project, visit pinemap.org. Research assistantships include a full tuition waiver, benefits, and a competitive annual stipend including summer support (~$21-22k). Interested students should contact: Dr. Brian D. Strahm (540-231-8627, brian.strahm@vt.edu) and/or Dr. John R. Seiler (540-231-5461, jseiler@vt.edu). Posted: 2/18/13.

Virginia Tech: The Physiological Ecology Laboratory is seeking exceptionally qualified and motivated candidates for two Ph.D. graduate positions for 2013. Each student will focus on various aspects of avian incubation behavior and how these parental effects influence fitness correlates in adult birds and their offspring. Possible research projects include field studies and/or captive experiments in aviaries using waterfowl or passerines. Each assistantship will include 4 years (48 months) of full support as a graduate research assistant, a full tuition waiver, and modest research funds. Students will be expected to apply for additional funding to support aspects of their field and laboratory research. Both fellowships will begin in 2013, but start date is negotiable. Minimum qualifications include a M.S. degree (or equivalent experience) in a biological discipline and a proven publication record. Additional information about our laboratory including recent relevant publications on avian incubation and maternal effects can be found on our website, linked above. Applicants should submit their CV (including GPA and GRE scores), contact information for at least three references, and a one-page letter describing their research interests as they relate to these positions to Dr. William A. Hopkins (hopkinsw@vt.edu). Submissions will be considered as they are received, but should be received no later than January 31, 2013. Posted: 11/1/12.

Virginia Tech: The newly established McGlothlin lab is looking for enthusiastic and motivated Ph.D. students to start in fall 2013. Research in the lab focuses on a wide variety of questions in evolutionary genetics and evolutionary ecology. We are broadly interested in the evolution of complex phenotypes. Ongoing research projects in the lab involve comparative quantitative genetics of Anolis lizards and molecular evolution of toxin resistance in garter snakes. Students in the McGlothlin lab will be strongly encouraged to develop their own ideas and projects, which may either build upon or depart from the lab's current research. The McGlothlin lab is part of the growing Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior and Integrative Organismal Biology groups in the Department of Biological Sciences. Outside the department, potential for collaboration and scientific interaction exist in a number of departments across campus, including Entomology, Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, and the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. Interested students should contact Dr. Joel McGlothlin (joelmcg@vt.edu), providing a description of your research interests and experience and a CV or resume that includes GPA, GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references. Funding is available through both teaching and research assistantships, and a number of competitive fellowships are offered by the university. For full consideration, applications to the department should be received by December 31, 2012. See also: Graduate program and Graduate application. Posted: 10/31/12.

Virginia Tech: The Integrative Organismal Biology (IOB) group is a diverse group of scientists studying the behavior, ecology, evolution, and physiology of animals. IOB faculty are currently seeking talented and highly motivated graduate students to join the Ph.D. program in Biological Sciences beginning in Fall 2013. IOB is part of the growing Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior group in Virginia Tech’s Department of Biological Sciences. Members of IOB also interact frequently with scientists studying biology and related disciplines in other departments across campus, including Engineering Science, Entomology, Fish and Wildlife Conservation, and Statistics. Faculty Research Interests: Lisa Belden (Community ecology) Dana Hawley (Animal disease ecology) Joel McGlothlin (Evolutionary genetics, ecology, and physiology) Ignacio Moore (Mechanisms of behavior in free-living vertebrates) John Phillips (Sensory ecology and the neural basis of behavior) Kendra Sewall (Animal behavior and neurobiology) Jeff Walters (Behavioral ecology and conservation biology of birds) Applications for fall admission should be received by December 31, 2012 for full consideration. Applicants will be considered for financial aid in the form of graduate teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships. We strongly encourage prospective students to contact a faculty member as soon as possible to discuss their specific research interests. Graduate program information. Posted: 10/5/12.

Virginia Tech: Ph.D. Assistantship available in Microbial Ecology. Microbes mediate many important processes at the ecosystem and global scales, yet approximately 99% of all microbes are not culturable, meaning we know little or nothing about their distribution or role in the environment. Now, however, new molecular tools allow us to begin to answer very basic questions in microbial ecology. What microbes are present in a particular habitat? What kind of important or beneficial ecological functions might they provide? By combining new molecular methods with traditional culture based techniques we can seek to gain new insights into these important questions in a variety of habitats. Assistantship support is available for one or two incoming doctoral students focusing on microbial ecology in the Crop & Soil Environmental Sciences Department at Virginia Tech. Support is available to start in either spring or fall semesters of 2013. The Department offers ample resources for student research in environmental microbiology, including extensive laboratory and field equipment, opportunities to collaborate with a wide variety of colleagues within and beyond VT, and access to a wide variety of natural and managed ecosystems for study. Students would work under the advisement of Dr. Brian Badgley, with the opportunity to conduct independent research on variety of topics in microbial ecology. Work in the laboratory focuses on the structure and function of microbial populations and communities in environmental matrices such as surface waters, sediment, and soil. Students will use a combination of field work and laboratory techniques such as culturing, genomics, metagenomics, transcriptomics, or genetic fingerprinting. A background in microbiology, ecology, environmental science, or other related field is required. Experience in molecular biology is beneficial but not necessary. Formal application to the graduate program is required. In the meantime, applicants may submit unofficial copies of the following materials to Brian D. Badgley, Ph.D. (badgley@vt.edu): 1. A statement of interest describing past experience, research interests, and future goals. Please specifically address how your experience, skills, and goals match this particular position in my laboratory; 2. Curriculum vitae, including contact information for at least three references; 3. Academic transcripts; 4. GRE scores; and 5. TOEFL scores (if applicable). Posted: 9/25/12.

Wageningen University: We offer a PhD Position (1.0 FTE, Job Reference ASG-DW-ETH-0005) to undertake research on sexual selection and reproductive investment in great tits (Parus major) within the newly established Behavioural Ecology chair group at the Animal Science Department of Wageningen University, the Netherlands. This position is financed by the WIAS graduate school of Wageningen. It is linked to an EU funded project and comes with attractive equipment and consumables support. Research will be conducted in cooperation with the Animal Ecology Department of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW). This project will investigate the potential of individual differences in mate choice and reproductive investment to maintain phenotypic variation in great tits. Great tits vary between individuals in plumage characteristics. Individual birds are expected to differ in their mate preferences and reproductive allocation in relation to their own individual characters, which may help to maintain variation within the population. The project will involve performing captive mate choice trials with wild great tits, as well as extensive fieldwork to measure reproductive investment. There is also the opportunity to complement this behavioural and phenotypic work with genetic information. We ask - Candidates must have an MSc or equivalent experience in a behavioural ecology or related fields (e.g. Animal Behaviour, Animal Ecology) - Be enthusiastic about field work - Strong experimental and analytical skills - Good organizational and (written and spoken) communication skills, and a proven ability to collaborate with others. - Willingness to conduct to organize and extensive ornithological fieldwork. - Willingness to travel internationally, to attend conferences and visit other institutes. - A driver licence and a licence to carry out experiments with vertebrates (i.e. article9 of the WoD) is desirable. We offer - Employment basis: temporary for specified period. Duration of the contract: 1 + 3 years, maximum hours per week: 38. Additional conditions of employment: To begin with, a PhD-appointment for a period of 12 months. Continuation of the appointment with another 36 months will be based on performance evaluation. Gross salary per month € 2062 in the first year, rising to €2638 per month in the fourth year, based on a full time appointment. - Participation in the training program of the Graduate School 'Production Ecology & Resource conservation'. - An excellent opportunity to develop an international scientific network. The successful candidate will join the stimulating and international research environment of Wageningen. Wageningen is an internationally leading research and education institution, ranked among the top 25 universities in Europe (THE World University Rankings, 2011-12). This project will be carried out in the new Behavioral Ecology Group within the Department of Animal Sciences, and will be supervised by Dr. Camilla Hinde. For further information, please contact Dr. Camilla Hinde (camilla.hinde@wur.nl). The application deadline is 15 May 2013. Posted: 4/22/13.

Washington State University: I am seeking to recruit two students to pursue graduate degrees in Entomology (either MS or PhD) studying insect ecology, landscape ecology, and/or plant-insect interactions. These positions are not tied to any particular project. However, ongoing research in the laboratory focuses on: 1) Interactions between above- and below-ground herbivores on arthropod community structure and function 2) Effects of landscape composition and configuration on arthropod food webs 3) Plant-virus-vector interactions 4) Effects of sustainable agriculture on insect community structure and function Qualifications include a strong academic record and a desire to combine theory with empirical work. Students with a mathematical background and/or experience with geographical information systems are particularly encouraged to apply. The positions will involve field work in Washington, Idaho, and/or Oregon states. Candidates will ideally start in either January or May 2013 (prior to the start of the summer field season). Students will receive an annual stipend, a tuition waiver, and research support. Review of applications begins immediately and continues until filled. To apply, please email David Crowder at dcrowder@wsu.edu with the following: 1) A cover letter which discusses your background, qualifications, research interests, degree you wish to pursue, and available start date 2) A CV 3) Academic transcripts and/or GPA 4) GRE scores and percentiles 5) Contact information for at least 3 references. Posted: 10/16/12.

Washington State University Vancouver: The Aquatic Ecology Laboratory, directed by Dr. Stephen Bollens and Dr. Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens, has one or more paid assistantships available for new graduate students to contribute to a growing and dynamic program in Aquatic Ecology. This graduate position is specifically oriented around research in the ecology and potential impact of invasive zooplankton in the Columbia River Basin, but may also involve participating in on-going projects investigating harmful algal blooms, fish and invertebrate responses to wetland restoration, and diel vertical migration of plankton. The successful graduate student(s) will be supported on a combination of Research Assistantships and traditional Teaching Assistantships, totaling approximately $21,000/year, plus full tuition waivers. We are currently accepting applications to begin study in August 2013. Degree programs and application deadlines: M.S. and Ph.D. in Environmental Science. For August 2013 admission, applications will be accepted through May 30, 2013. For more information see WSUV Science Graduate Programs or contact us directly: Dr. Stephen M. Bollens (sbollens@vancouver.wsu.edu), Dr. Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens (rollboll@vancouver.wsu.edu), Washington State University Vancouver, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA 98686-9600 USA. Posted: 5/2/13.

Washington State University Vancouver: The Global Change and Watershed Biogeochemistry group seeks motivated, independent M.S. and Ph.D. students to work on improving understanding of feedbacks between climate change, watershed nutrient transfers, and ecosystem function within the Columbia River Basin. Successful candidates will participate as members of two recently-funded, multi-year, multi-institutional, interdisciplinary efforts focused on linkages between biogeochemical simulations, stakeholder perception, and water policy called Bio Earth and WISDM. Prospective students should have a strong background in the natural sciences (including at least one year of undergraduate chemistry), an interest in environmental modeling, and a dedication to research that improves understanding and management of aquatic and land-based resources. Experience with GIS, programming, and modeling will be considered a plus. Funding is available to support successful applicants, and all teaching and research assistantships include tuition waivers. Admission requirements: Environmental Science and Geology; application materials and instructions for the WSU Vancouver program. Despite the focus on MS degrees, Ph.D. degrees are offered at WSU Vancouver. More information on the application process. Interested parties should send inquiries along with a recent resume to John Harrison (john_harrison@wsu.edu) as soon as possible. Posted: 3/19/13, revised: 4/19/13.

Washington State University Vancouver: invites applications for the Individual Interdisciplinary PhD Program (IIDP). Graduate students enrolled in this program on the Vancouver campus will conduct research on the interface of mathematics and other disciplines, including ecology, environmental sciences, biology, and computer sciences, neurosciences, engineering. Candidates having background in one of these disciplines, and desire to increase their expertise in a complementary discipline, are encouraged to apply. Particular research projects include, but are not limited to, modeling and simulation of ecological, biological, biomedical or environmental systems in concert with laboratory or field studies. Several research and teaching assistantships are available. These assistantships completely cover tuition and provide a financial support for up to 5 years. The formal admission requirements include: Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 in all graduate coursework and have received a master's degree from an accredited institution. In addition to the regular graduate application materials, the IIDP application has to include specific faculty support and details on a possible interdisciplinary project. Thus, applicants should be interested in least two complementary disciplines. Within ecological and environmental sciences, faculty interests include conservation ecology, aquatic ecology, benthic ecology, disturbance ecology, environmental toxicology, global change and biogeochemistry, agroecology and urban ecosystems and physical oceanography in the coastal zone. For references, please, consider faculty interests in the Science disciplinary degree areas, Computer Science and Engineering. Please, contact Professors Alex Dimitrov (alex.dimitrov@vancouver.wsu.edu) or Nick Strigul (nick.strigul@vancouver.wsu.edu) with preliminary inquiries and questions (use "IIDP inquiry" as the email subject line). Priority applications are due January 10, 2013. For general information about graduate study at WSU Vancouver, please contact Cheryl Schultz (schultzc@vancouver.wsu.edu), Associate Professor & Graduate Coordinator. Posted: 12/11/12.

Washington State University Vancouver: The Aquatic Ecology Laboratory, directed by Dr. Stephen Bollens and Dr. Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens, has one or more paid assistantships available for new graduate students to contribute to a growing and dynamic program in Aquatic Ecology. This graduate position is specifically oriented aroundresearch in the ecology and potential impact of invasive zooplankton in the Columbia River Basin, but may also involve participating in on-going projects investigating harmful algal blooms, fish and invertebrate responses to wetland restoration, and diel vertical migration of plankton. The successful graduate student(s) will be supported on a combination of Research Assistantships and traditional Teaching Assistantships, ~$20k/year, plus full tuition waivers. We are currently accepting applications to begin study in August 2013. Degree programs and application deadlines: M.S. and Ph.D. in Environmental Science. For August 2013 admission, applications will be accepted through March 2013, but priority will given to those who apply by January 10, 2013. For more information see WSUV Science Graduate Programs or contact us directly: Dr. Stephen M. Bollens (sbollens@vancouver.wsu.edu) Dr. Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens (rollboll@vancouver.wsu.edu). Posted: 11/30/12.

Washington State University Vancouver: Graduate student positions are currently available for the MS and PhD programs in Biology, Environmental Science, and Mathematics at Washington State University's Vancouver campus. Most positions are funded with teaching and/or research assistantships that include tuition waivers. Faculty research focuses on conservation ecology and genetics, marine ecology and oceanography, disturbance ecology, biogeochemistry, environmental physics, environmental toxicology, animal behavior, urban and agroecology, mathematical biology, and neuroscience. More information: graduate programs: We do not accept students without a faculty advisor so please contact a faculty member in an area of research similar to your own about the potential for admission to graduate school. WSU Vancouver is located in southwest Washington across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon and is close to the Cascades, Puget Sound, and the ocean. It offers significant opportunities for research, a variety of neighboring institutions and agencies for collaboration, and an excellent quality of life. Degree programs are offered across all WSU campuses and students in Vancouver may participate in activities in Pullman. Priority applications are due January 10, 2013. Please contact Cheryl Schultz (schultzc@vancouver.wsu.edu) for additional information. Posted: 10/19/12.

Western Kentucky University: The Aquatic Ecology and Systematics Lab in the Department of Biology & Center for Biodiversity Studies is searching for one M.S. student to contribute to a karst food web project addressing the interactions between macroinvertebrates and seasonal filamentous algal growth. The research will be conducted on the mainstem Green River, including the WKU Green River Preserve, a ca. 1,200 acre landscape that is easily accessed within a one hour drive from campus. The upper Green River is one of the top four rivers in the U.S. according to fish (150+ species) and mussel (70+ species) diversity. Frequent travel to conduct fieldwork during summer and autumn are expected. Qualifications: B.A. or B.S. in Biology, Ecology, or closely-related field, strong work ethic, the ability to work independently and in a team environment, good writing and oral communication skills, and field-based and/or lab-based coursework or research experiences. Candidates who meet the stated qualifications need to submit the following materials to Scott A. Grubbs, Ph.D. (scott.grubbs@wku.edu) with the subject line “GREEN RIVER”: (1) letter of intent, describing background and career goals, (2) resume or CV, (3) college transcripts (an unofficial copy is acceptable), (4) GRE scores (unofficial copies acceptable), and (5) contact information for three references. To provide a prospective student with two low-water seasons to conduct research, the preferred starting date is summer 2013. Posted: 1/29/13.

Western Kentucky University: M. Sc. Opportunity, Ecological Morphology – Fall 2013. The Collyer lab seeks 1-2 students with combined interests and experience in biology, mathematics, and statistics, and who are especially interested in research directed at ecological explanations for the evolution of organismal morphological diversity. Current empirical research in the lab is focused on the evolution of morphological diversity in North American desert fishes. Current theoretical research in the lab is focused on the development of methods for analysis of phenotypic change using high-dimensional data (e.g., 3-D geometric morphometric data). We especially need students with interest in burgeoning research projects that utilize the WKU Upper Green River Biopreserve. Competitive funding and tuition waivers are available to qualified students. Prospective students must have a strong quantitative background in addition to a bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) in biology, zoology, ecology, evolutionary biology, or related field. Demonstrated excellence in coursework is required; a demonstrated aptitude for biological research and experience in multivariate statistics is preferred. Candidates should send an email to Dr. Michael Collyer (michael.collyer@wku.edu), including a cover letter describing research interests and quantitative skills, CV, most recent transcripts (unofficial is ok), and contact information for 2-3 references. For more information about the M. S. Program in Biology, please visit the Department of Biology. Posted: 1/4/13.

Western University: Motivated M.Sc. student sought for a unique opportunity in the Department of Geography at Western University to conduct inter-disciplinary research as part of a joint initiative with Laurentian University’s Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit. Student project will be focused on the development of GISbased protocols for characterization of catchment-scale descriptors for reference condition approach based stream ecosystem assessments. Student responsibilities will include researching, developing and evaluating GIS techniques as well as analyzing and reporting research outcomes. Applicants are expected to have a strong background in geographic information sciences and an interest in applying this knowledge to environmentally-based problems. Willingness and ability to work as part of a team is a must. The successful candidate will be based at Western University in London, Ontario with opportunities for lab exchange placement at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario. Required qualifications: - Bachelor’s degree in Geography, Environmental Science or related discipline - Meet enrollment requirements of the Dept of Geography. Additional desired qualifications: - Experience with ArcGIS and associated software - Knowledge of univariate and multivariate statistical analyses - Demonstrated written and oral communication skills. Please send your CV, names of two references (along with contact phone and email), and a cover letter summarizing qualifications and research interests to Dr. Adam Yates at adam.yates@uwo.ca. Start date is September 2013 with opportunity for employment as an aquatic research assistant at the Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit, May through August. Review of applications will begin February 1, 2013 and continue until the position is filled. Posted: 1/24/13.

Western University: Motivated M.Sc. student sought for a unique opportunity in the Department of Geography to conduct research as part of an interuniversity collaboration to develop an integrated aquatic monitoring and management framework for the Tobacco Creek Model Watershed Manitoba, Canada. Student project will be focused on development of indicators of aquatic ecosystem health and ecological thresholds to land use activities for use in watershed assessment and management. Student responsibilities will include designing and executing experiments and analyzing and reporting research outcomes. Applicants are expected to have a strong background in aquatic ecology, environmental science or related discipline and interest in designing experiments and conducting field and lab work. Ability to work as part of a team is a must. The successful candidate will be based at Western University in London, Ontario with opportunities for lab exchange placements at the Canadian Rivers Institute at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, New Brunswick and the Canadian Centre for Inland Waters in Burlington Ontario. The candidate will also be required to conduct fieldwork in southern Manitoba as part of their thesis research. Required qualifications: - B.Sc. in Aquatic Ecology, Environmental Science or related discipline - Meet enrollment requirements of the Dept of Geography. Additional desired qualifications: - Experience with ArcGIS - Experience conducting aquatic fieldwork - Knowledge of univariate and multivariate statistical analyses - Demonstrated written & oral communication skills - Valid driver’s license. Please send your CV, a list of two references (along with contact phone and email), and a cover letter summarizing qualifications and research interests to Dr. Adam Yates at adam.yates@uwo.ca. Start date is September 2013 with employment opportunity as a research assistant from May through August 2013. Review of applications will begin February 1, 2013 and continue until the position is filled. Posted: 1/24/13.

Western Washington University: The Biology Department at has openings for graduate students starting Fall 2013. Faculty members in the department offer a wide range of expertise, from molecular biology to ecology. Graduate students are eligible for teaching assistantships, which fund the majority of tuition and provide a stipend of $12,116 per year. WWU is located in Bellingham, WA, a small coastal city at the base of Mt. Baker in the northwestern part of the state. Potential advisors include: Dietmar Schwarz: Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics, Evolutionary Ecology. Schwarz's lab offers opportunities to study speciation and hybridization in host specific insects (apple maggot flies and relatives). Students would also have the opportunity to collaborate with Alejandro Acevedo-Gutierrez on a molecular study of diet specialization in seals. Dave Hooper: Plant Community and Ecosystem Ecology. I will be accepting one graduate student in fall 2013. My local research is currently focused on assessing ecosystem services associated with different scenarios of riparian restoration in Whatcom County. Student work would combine GIS analyses of ecosystem services and field work, particularly on nutrient retention, to validate modeling results. Lynn Pillitteri: Plant Molecular and Developmental Biology. A potential graduate project in my lab would be aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms driving cell type differentiation in the model organism, Arabidopsis thaliana. Robin Kodner: Marine Microbial Metagenomics. The Kodner lab does interdisciplinary work integrating marine microbial ecology with comparative genomics and bioinformatics for metagenomes. I am recruiting for one student for work on bioinformatics projects. Some experience with sequence analysis and programming required. Anu Singh-Cundy: Plant Physiology. We study plant reproduction at the physiological, cellular, and molecular levels. Current projects are focused on understanding the role of HD-AGPs, which are proteins that promote pollen tube growth, in members of the Solanaceae and also in Arabidopsis. More information or by contact Dr. Deb Donovan, Graduate Program Advisor, at donovan@biol.wwu.edu Late applications will be considered. Posted: 1/31/13.

Wilfrid Laurier University: There are two graduate positions available through WLU and the Taiga Plains Research Network as part of an ongoing partnership with the Government of the Northwest Territories. We are rapidly expanding our integrative research program to better understand coupled ecological and hydrological responses of permafrost-impacted systems to warming. Our region of focus is the Taiga Plains Ecoregion, which spans the length of the MacKenzie River Valley in the Northwest Territories, Canada. This ecoregion covers a wide latitudinal range and therefore a wide range of permafrost ecosystem characteristics (see map), including boreal, taiga and tundra systems. Full details: http://forestecology.ca/. Posted: 12/20/12.

Wright State University: The Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences Ph.D. program at Wright State in Dayton, Ohio invites applicants for Fall 2013 admission. The program provides interdisciplinary and focused topic courses, exciting research opportunities and training to prepare its students to better understand and solve complex environmental problems affecting human and ecosystem health, such as those caused by anthropogenic pollutants, increased greenhouse gas emissions, invasive species, habitat fragmentation and loss of biodiversity. Our students receive training in preparation for careers in academia, state and federal agencies, industry, and non-profit organizations. Through a rigorous core curriculum and dissertation research, our program is designed to expose students to both traditional and emerging areas of environmental sciences, and offers the ability to focus on research in a more defined area. The program includes faculty in the departments of Biological Sciences, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Chemistry, Physics, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Neuroscience, Cell Biology and Physiology, Computer Science, and Mathematics and Statistics. Current research, which is funded by agencies such as the United States Department of Agriculture, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Defense, ranges from issues of importance to aquatic, terrestrial and atmospheric environments and from levels of organization from molecular to ecosystem levels. Research approaches range from data mining and modeling to lab- and field-based research. The program offers stipends on a competitive basis to qualified applicants ($22,660/yr. for Fall 2013) along with a waiver of tuition costs. Highly qualified applicants are also eligible to receive a Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) Fellowship supplement for the first year in the program. First consideration of applicants for Fall 2013 admission will occur on February 1, 2013. Applicants are encouraged to contact program faculty in their areas of interest prior to completing the application to determine fit with a program faculty member. A commitment by a faculty member to a student is required for admission. To apply online and to read more about our program and its curriculum, research, faculty and student profiles, please visit our main program website (linked above). Questions regarding our program may be directed to our program office: Ms. Cathy Kempf, Administrative Specialist (937-775-3273, director.envsci@wright.edu). Posted: 11/5/12.

WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF: The research team 'Mountain Ecosystems' at SLF in Davos (Switzerland) is looking for a PhD student to quantify biological effects on soil stability. The project is part of the National Research Program 68 "Sustainable use of soil as a resource". The position is fully funded for the duration of the PhD (3 years) and will start in spring 2013. Based on direct shear tests, soil aggregate stability analyses, and rain simulation experiments you will analyze the contribution of plants and mycorrhizal fungi to soil stability in the laboratory and field. You will perform soil mechanical investigations in close collaboration with the Institute for Geotechnical Engineering IGT at ETH Zürich. Furthermore, you will assist in micro- and molecular biological analyses of the plants and mycorrhizal fungi applied. You will publish your results in international peer-reviewed journals. You have a Master degree in environmental sciences, environmental engineering or civil engineering, experience in experimental and practical work as well as data evaluation and database management and are fluent in English. You bring a sound basis in geotechnical engineering and are interested in ecology. You are a well organized and efficient worker with good oral and written communication skills, are able to work in a team, and willing to work at different locations within Switzerland. Please send your complete application online using reference number 772 to Jasmine Zimmermann, Human Resources WSL/SLF. Frank Graf, e-mail: graf@slf.ch, or Christian Rixen, e-mail: rixen@slf.ch, will be happy to answer any questions or offer further information. Deadline for applications is mid-March 2013. Master's student opportunities. Posted: 2/5/13.

WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF: The research team 'Mountain Ecosystems' in Davos, Switzerland, is looking for a PhD student to explore patterns and mechanisms of local plant colonization and extinctions on alpine summits. You will design and conduct vegetation surveys and experiments on mountain summits, aided by a field assistant. Moreover, you will analyze long-term changes in high-alpine flora in relation to local climate change in different mountain regions of Europe, based on a largely existing dataset. You will publish your results in international peer-reviewed journals. The position is fully funded for the duration of the PhD (3 years) and will start in spring 2013. You have a masters degree in biology, ecology or botany, experience in experimental field work and statistical analyses (particularly in R) and are fluent in English. Field work is weather dependent and requires spatial and temporal flexibility during summer, physical fitness, ability to move securely in alpine terrain, and motivation for long field days. You are a team player, possess good oral and written communication skills, good organizational ability, and are capable of working efficiently. Previous plant identification and mountaineering experience are desirable, and the willingness to rapidly learn the alpine flora an absolute must. Please send your complete application (cover letter, CV with photo, addresses of potential references) using reference number 760 to Ms. Jasmine Zimmermann, Human Resources WSL/SLF. Dr. Sonja Wipf, Tel. +41 (0)81 4170276, wipf@slf.ch or Dr. Christian Rixen, Tel. +41 (0)81 4170214, rixen@slf.ch will be happy to answer any questions or offer further information. To apply online, see the link at the end of the full job ad. Moreover, we also offer possibilities for Master's Theses on alpine plant or vegetation ecology, for instance in the context of the above topic. Students from any country can apply, and will be co-supervised together with a responsible professor at their home university. Interested students should get in touch with us by sending a short statement of their research interests and CV to Sonja Wipf (wipf@slf.ch) or Christian Rixen (rixen@slf.ch). See also:Gipfelflora. Posted: 11/8/12.

York University: The Northern Aquatics Lab is seeking a motivated MSc or PhD student to study the effects of permafrost thaw on carbon cycling in aquatic environments. Successful candidates will begin their position in Sept., 2013, and work on a recently funded multi-year, multi-institutional project in the western Canadian Arctic. This research will specifically focus on the effects of permafrost thaw on the land-to-water flux of organic and inorganic C, and the fate of permafrost carbon in aquatic environments. The research will link to past and ongoing work in the lab that has examined the importance of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in lakes and river channels of the Mackenzie Delta, the interplay between DOC, bacteria, and greenhouse gas production, and the importance of constituent flux from large northern rivers for processes occurring in the Arctic Ocean nearshore. This work will have both laboratory and field components. Students will be expected to develop and conduct a research project, with supervision, master a range of laboratory and field techniques, and spend several months conducting field research based out of the Aurora Research Institute in Inuvik, NT, Canada. Canadian applicants are particularly encouraged. The Northern Aquatics Lab is housed within York's Geography Department, details of which can be found here. York University is located in north Toronto; as Canada's third largest university, it offers significant analytical and research facilities and houses a vibrant and multi-disciplinary university community. Candidates should have a background in physical geography, ecology, environmental science or biogeochemistry, and be able and willing to undertake field work in a remote, northern location. Interested candidates should send a statement of interest along with a recent CV to Suzanne Tank (tanks@yorku.ca) as soon as possible. Posted: 4/26/13.

Assistantships and Fellowships | Fellowship Program Links | Short Courses | Summer Jobs

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Short Courses:

Ecological Consequences of Climate Change: Integrating Research Approaches: The Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC) (Sevilla, Spain) invites applications for its fourth international course on climate change entitled ‘Ecological Consequences of Climate Change: Integrating Research Approaches’ taking place from 30 September to 11 October 2013 in the heart of Doñana National Park. The course is open to students at the early postdoc, PhD and Master/advanced Diploma levels who are involved in global-change research. Its aim is to provide a synthetic overview upon different research perspectives ranging from paleoecology to population genetics, ecophysiology and bioclimatic modeling. The course will include lectures and practical exercises provided by an international panel of high-profile researchers, as well as field trips within the National Park. Invited teachers: Isabelle Chuine, CEFE (CNRS), Montpellier, France. Solomon Dobrowski, University of Montana, USA. Mary Edwards, University of Southampton, UK. Arndt Hampe, UMR1202 BIOGECO (INRA), Cestas, France. Ingol Kühn, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Germany. Jorge Lobo, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC), Madrid, Spain Fernando Valladares, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC), Madrid, Spain. Organizers: Juan José Negro, director of Estación Biológica de Doñana, and Arndt Hampe. The course language will be English. Support from the Gas Natural Chair ‘Biodiversity Conservation under Climate Change’ and 7FP project ECOGENES, enables us to limit registration fees to 100 Euros and to cover all costs for transportation between Sevilla and Doñana National Park, accommodation and meals during the 2-weeks course. Applicants should provide a brief CV (max. two pages) as well as a statement (max. 500 words) about their research interests/current projects and why they would like to attend to the course. Application deadline is 7 July. Please send applications in a single pdf file and any related questions to Begoña Arrizabalaga (bego@ebd.csic.es). Posted: 6/21/13.

Biogeochemical cycles in highly productive marine ecosystems: Buenos Aires, 2-14 December 2013. Details: http://eco-marinos.at.fcen.uba.ar/SUMMERSCHOOL.html. Grants available! Application deadline: 1st August 2013. Posted: 6/18/13.

Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy and Management: Starting Fall 2013, the Michigan State University, Department of Forestry will once again offer the Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy and Management. And we are pleased to announce that each of the four courses required to complete the certificate are now available online. This offers students the interdisciplinary tools and conceptual background to plan, implement, manage and evaluate forestry-based, climate-change mitigation projects. The Certificate program gives students an edge in competing for employment in carbon mitigation projects of corporations, governments, and non-governmental organizations. The program teaches students how forest management actions affect forest carbon balance, the ins and outs of forest carbon markets, the social context of managing forests for carbon sequestration, and the tools for measuring, monitoring, and accounting for forest carbon – including satellite imagery, remote sensing, and integrated carbon sequestration models. The program is open to a wide range of students, including students with a bachelor’s degree who are not enrolled in an M.S. or Ph.D. program, as well as current M.S. and Ph.D. students at MSU and other universities. To be considered for admission into the Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy and Management program, applicants should have completed a bachelor’s degree in forestry, natural resources, environmental sciences, or a related field. The program is open to students in any environment-related graduate program at MSU. Given the need to integrate sustainability and climate change mitigation across all economic sectors, the program will consider applicants from all backgrounds, including those involved in business, law, forestry, natural resources, environmental consulting, and government. Students without experience in forestry or a related field may need to supplement the certificate courses with independent study or additional coursework. The certification will appear on transcripts of MSU Graduate Students. Students not enrolled in an MSU graduate degree program will receive an MSU Certificate. To earn the Certificate, students must complete all of the following courses: • Forest Biogeochemistry and Global Climate Change (FOR 831) • Human Dimensions of Forest Carbon Management (FOR 833) • Forest Carbon Policy, Economics, and Finance (FOR 835) • Measurement and Monitoring of Forest Carbon (FOR 837). FOR 831 and FOR 833 will be offered during Fall Semester 2013 and FOR 835 and FOR 837 will be offered in Spring Semester 2014. See MSU Schedule of Courses for more detail. For more information, visit the link above or contact Dr. David Rothstein at (517) 432-3353 or rothste2@msu.edu. Posted: 6/5/13.

Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Graduate/Professional Training Courses: The Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, a partnership between George Mason University and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI), is proud to announce their updated graduate/professional course schedule which includes 3 exciting new offerings. The School is now offering more courses than ever before, in a wide range of topics, all focused on training in different aspects of biodiversity conservation, from effective conservation leadership, to technical tools in statistics and field sampling. All courses are currently either 1 or 2-week intensive residential courses and are now held in a brand-new, sustainably-built Academic Center on the grounds of SCBI in Front Royal Virginia. Most courses can be taken either for graduate credit or continuing education units. See our upcoming offerings below and check out our website for more course details and pricing. Upcoming courses: Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds (new!) September 9-20, 2013; Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis & Remote Sensing September 30-October 11, 2013; Conservation Breeding Centers for Wildlife Sustainability (new!) October 7-14, 2013; Applied Climate Change: Gaining Practical Skills for Climate Change Adaptation October 21-November 1, 2013; Effective Conservation Leadership October 28-November 1, 2013; Collaboration and Conflict Resolution Skills Training: Water Quality Issues (new!) November 5-8, 2013; Species Monitoring & Conservation: Terrestrial Mammals April 28-May 9, 2014. Visit http://smconservation.gmu.edu or email us at SCBItraining@si.edu for more details about each course, course costs, and credits earned. Posted: 6/4/13.

Principles of Ecosystem Ecology: New Course for Fall 2013: Principles of Ecosystem Ecology (BIOL 697), Dr. Joseph Craine, KSU Biology, Instructor, 3 credits. **Offered on-line through Kansas State University** With the Earth’s climate, flora, and fauna changing rapidly, there is a pressing need to understand terrestrial ecosystem processes and their sensitivity to environmental and biotic changes. Ecosystem ecology examines the interactions between living organisms, including people, and their environment as integrated systems. The course will focus on the central principles that describe the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems and their freshwater components. The core of the course focuses on understanding the flows of energy, water, carbon, and nutrients from their abiotic origins through plants, animals, and decomposer organisms. The course covers integration of these processes at scales from local to global. Principles of Ecosystem Ecology will also synthesize recent advances in ecosystem ecology and teach students connections between theory and application. Posted: 5/29/13.

Writing for Environmental Professionals: Registration is now OPEN for "Writing for Environmental Professionals", an online course offered by the Duke Environmental Leadership program held June 3- July 12, 2013. Instructor Dr. Nicolette Cagle says, "Good writing shapes readers' judgments of your work and alters perceptions of environmental issues. In this course, we learn techniques for clear, well-organized, and audience-centered writing to polish your own writing style, satisfy the needs of demanding readers, and effectively present your content." This course counts toward the DEL Certificate in Environmental Communications. Our online class format guarantees small classes with synchronous online face-to-face meetings each week plus peer interaction. Each participant gets personalized feedback from both the instructor and peers. Space is limited, so register today at the link above. Questions? Contact Allison Besch, Duke University: del@nicholas.duke.edu; (919)613-8082. Posted: 4/23/13.

Online course: Aquatic Ecology/Limnology: John Downing, Iowa State University, will teach his online course in Aquatic Ecology and Limnology again this summer. The course provides 3 credits of undergraduate or non-major graduate credit, which are easily transferable to other academic institutions. Course Description: Structure and function of aquatic ecosystems with application to fishery and pollution problems. Emphasis on the comparative analysis of aquatic ecosystems, examining lakes, ponds, wetlands, streams, rivers, and estuaries. Lectures will acquaint students with the current state of knowledge in the aquatic sciences. Dates: Monday, May 20, 2013 to Friday, July 12, 2013. Registration Deadline: Monday, May 6th. Posted: 4/23/13.

Summer Field School: Primate Behavior and Ecology at Ometepe Biological Field Station: The Maderas Rainforest Conservancy presents… Primate Behavior and Ecology Field School Where: Ometepe Biological Field Station, Nicaragua. When: Session #2, June 22 – July 17, 2013. This summer, the rainforest is your classroom! Join Dr. Ruth Steel as you learn about how primates interact with their environment. The materials and topics covered in this course are equivalent to an upper-division undergraduate course, but with an emphasis on field methods, data collection, and research design. You will learn about how primates adapt to their ecosystems both physically and behaviorally. We will study forest ecology and primate behavior from an evolutionary perspective. How behavioral ecology data must be incorporated into conservation strategies will also be emphasized. You will gain first-hand experience learning and employing important field methods while collecting behavioral data on white-faced capuchins (*Cebus capucinus*) and mantled howling monkeys (*Alouatta palliata*). Under the instructor’s supervision, each student will design and complete a short field project, writing and presenting the results to the class. A background in biology or physical anthropology is helpful but not required. However, a desire to be in the rain forest is a must! Cost: $2095, which covers registration fees, housing, station/program fees, three daily meals, and transportation to/from airport to the field site. Flight not included. For more information and questions: www.maderasrfc.org. Posted: 4/19/13.

Forensic Entomology Workshop: The New Jersey School of Conservation together with the University of Montclair is organizing a two-week workshop on forensic entomology; the workshop will be held at the NJSchool of Conservation, in Branchville, NJ, just about 1h from New York City. Forensic entomology is the study of insects associated with organic decomposition. Students will observe and analyze the small ecosystem which is created around and on decomposing carcasses, describe post-mortem phenomena, collect entomological evidence and perform lab analysis to help establish PMI (Post-Mortem Interval) or time of death. See the brochure for the workshop for more details. Participants will have two weeks of room and board, educational activities (lectures, field work and lab work) and lots of recreational activities, such as boating, archery and climbing. For information please contact Denise Gemmellaro at denisucciola@yahoo.com. Posted: 4/17/13.

Science Communication Course: The Integration and Application Network (a part of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) is conducting a three-day course in communicating science effectively. The course is being held in Cambridge, Maryland, 7-9 May, 2013. The hands-on approach means that participants come away from the course with the technical skills to effectively communicate scientific information in a variety of communication products. Further details and online registration. The course includes training in Conceptual diagrams, Layout design, Community Engagement, Integrated Assessments, and more! If you have questions about the course please email ian@umces.edu. Posted: 4/17/13.

Free outreach training class for scientists: Are you interested in connecting to the public with your research? SciFund Challenge is organizing an outreach training class for scientists that we'll be running for the month of May. The class is free and is intended for scientists that are new to outreach, but would like to get started with it. The class is open to scientists at any level, in any discipline. The class will be conducted over the Internet, so all countries are welcome. More information about the class. The deadline to fill out the short application form is April 24th. Posted: 4/5/13.

Environmental Information Management Institute: The University of New Mexico is presenting our third *Environmental Information Management Institute* June 3-21. The institute consists of three one-week intensive classes that may be taken for credit. The topics include: - Week 1: Environmental Information Management - Week 2: Environmental data analysis and visualization - Week 3: Spatial Data Management in Environmental Science The Institute is targeted at MA and PhD level students and professionals that want to expand their skill set in the management, analysis, and visualization of environmental data and information. For more information , visit the institute web page, linked above, or contact Teresa Neely (neely@unm.edu). Posted: 4/5/13.

6th Annual Flux Course at Niwot Ridge: The 6th annual flux course will take place the University of Colorado Mountain Research Station from the 15th through the 26th of July this summer. The flux course seeks to cross train attendees in measurement techniques and advanced modeling approaches for quantifying carbon and water fluxes between the atmosphere and the biosphere. The course will be offered to 24 graduate students, post-docs and early career scientists. Topics will include: flux measurements at the leaf level; modeling leaf CO2 and H2O fluxes; eddy covariance measurements; use of stable isotopes to infer ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes; predictions of fluxes from satellite observations; canopy flux models; assimilation of flux observations and satellite remote sensing data into ecosystem process models; and Bayesian approaches to modeling. Attendees stay at the University of Colorado Mountain Research Station, near Boulder, Colorado, USA (dormitory style accommodation). New application April 12, 2013. Selections will be announced by April 15, 2013. Fees: $2500 for course fees, room and board (includes all meals); but you must provide your own means of transportation to Boulder, Colorado. Scholarships: We are pleased to announce that this year the AMERIFLUX network will provide a limited number of scholarship which will cover the fees (not travel). Details and elegibilty information to follow. Apply to: Dr. Dave Moore, School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona. Please send questions or applications by email to fluxobsandmodels@gmail.com For applications: Email a CV, and a statement as to why you want to participate in the course and how you anticipate it helping your research. Arrange to have a letter/email sent from your major advisor supporting your application. Flyer. Posted: 2/27/13, revised: 4/4/13.

Stable Isotope Ecology: May 27-31, 2013, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada. Instructor: Dr. Björn Wissel. Deadline: 5 April 2013. The Canadian Institute of Ecology and Evolution (CIEE) will provide room and board for successful graduate student applicants, as well as the course fee and all course materials and analytical supplies. Students and their supervisors will be responsible for travel costs to Regina. Applications (resume or CV, and letter of interest) will be received via email to: CIEE-ICEE@uregina.ca More information below, or please visit: http://ciee-icee.com/news-and-announcements Target Audience: Graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and early-career researchers seeking a better understanding of new and emerging uses of stable isotope in ecology. Applicants should have a minimum of a BSc degree and be working in a research institution, enrolled full- or part-time graduate degree in science (e.g., MSc, PhD), or have equivalent background and instructor permission. This course is ideal for ecologists, evolutionary biology, and environmental scientists who are new to isotopic analysis, as well as more experienced researchers interested in innovative techniques and pioneering new uses. The course will cover main concepts on stable isotope ecology, and look at the most important techniques that use natural abundance isotopes to follow whole ecosystem element cycling. Topics will include: concepts, notations and history of stable isotope ecology, theoretical principles and lab demonstrations of isotope mass ratio spectrometry (IRMS), techniques for sample collection and preparation, isotope circulation in the biosphere (C, N, S, H, and O), stable isotope fractionation (open and closed systems), and stable isotope food-web models. This course will highlight new and emerging uses of stable isotope analysis in a variety of ecological disciplines. While the use of natural abundance isotopes in ecological research is now relatively standard, new techniques and ways of interpreting patterns are developing rapidly. The course will provide a thorough, up-to-date examination of these methods of research. In each case, the instructor will explain the background to the methodology, look at the underlying principles and assumptions, and outline the potential limitations and pitfalls. Lectures, assigned readings, discussion, laboratory demonstrations and exercises, and short practice of techniques for sample collection and preparation. Classes will be Monday to Friday, 9-12 am, and 1:30-4:30 pm. Applications will include a resume or CV, and letter of interest: Indicate please why the course interests you, and how your own research could be benefited from taking this course. Include brief details of your background on isotope stable ecology, and any relevant experience you have on the application of stable isotope techniques in ecology studies. All applications will be received via email to: CIEE-ICEE@uregina.ca The enrollment capacity is 12 students. The Canadian Institute of Ecology and Evolution (CIEE)3 will provide room and board for successful graduate student applicants, asinformation, please contact the Associate Director of CIEE, Dr. Diego Steinaker: CIEE-ICEE@uregina.ca. Posted: 4/3/13.

Costa Rica Tropical Ecology: The University of Georgia is pleased to be offering its 14th annual Costa Rica Tropical Ecology Programs, based at our UGA campus in San Luis de Monteverde, Costa Rica. We are currently inviting participation by interested students at colleges and universities throughout the U.S. Our Maymester 2013 Ecology Program offers Tropical Ecology, Ecology Laboratory (3000 level) and Ecology Research (4000 level) courses, and the program will run from May 13 – June 5, 2011. Our Fall 2013 Ecology Program offers Conservation Biology, Tropical Ecology, and General Ecology (all 3000 level), Ornithology, Ecology research (4000 level), and several Spanish courses. The Fall Program will run from August - November. These interdisciplinary programs involve the study of tropical environments, their natural history and their people. The approach is intensive, challenging, and hands-on, with an emphasis on building skills of observation, analysis, and critical thinking and learning to apply those skills in carrying out original research in the field. Students live and work at field stations in a variety of tropical habitats, including lowland rain forest, coastal and marine sites, and cloud forest habitats. Applications are welcome from students at all accredited U.S. institutions, and we will arrange for the transfer of credit hours to your home institution. Students from outside of Georgia will receive in-state tuition. Participants must be in good standing at their home institution. No Spanish background is required; the courses are taught in English by University of Georgia faculty members. The program cost is approx. $3000 for the Maymester and approx $8500 for the Fall Program, which covers all in-country lodging, meals, and activities. Airfare is not included. For further information on the program, including help with arranging credit transfer and possible financial assistance, please contact Scott Connelly (scottcon@uga.edu). Posted: 4/3/13.

Three online summer courses at Rutgers: The Departments of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources and Landscape Architecture at Rutgers University are offering three online courses (Conservation Techniques, Sustainable Environmental Management, and Fundamentals of Environmental Geomatics) this summer. Course descriptions – including information about registration (pdf). These are for-credit courses. Instructor: Marci Meixler, PhD Professor of Ecology/GIS Rutgers University. Posted: 4/3/13.

Tropical Ecology Courses: The Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation (ITEC) offers a large number of courses at the Bocas del Toro Biological Station, Boca del Drago, Isla Colon, Republic of Panama. The biological station is located on a beach facing the Caribbean Sea. Coral reef and seagrass ecosystems lie out in front of the station and lowland tropical rain forests lie directly behind. This juxtaposition of the two most biologically diverse ecosystems provides tremendous opportunities for education and research. See http://www.itec-edu.org/ for details. Posted: 11/5/12, revised: 3/29/13.

SER-Europe (Society for Ecological Restoration) "summer" school: - May 13-18th 2013 - Southern France. See the flyer (pdf) for details. Application will be validated as they come until we have 20 participants. Posted: 3/27/13.

Summer School: Feedbacks in environmental systems: The *third edition* of the CNRS Advanced Summer School "Feedbacks in environmental systems" will take place 10-15 Juin 2013 in La Rochelle (France) and will focus on the interactions between Climate, Ecosystems, and Society. The objective of the Summer School is to stimulate an interdisciplinary research community working on the theme of interacting complex environmental systems, building on the expertise of invited specialists that teach the lectures and interact with working groups. Keywords of the session of 2013: atmosphere & oceans, biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, climate, complex systems, dynamical systems, economy, ecosystems, evolution, population & community dynamics, society-environment interactions, time series The deadline of registration is 13 May 2013. The maximum number of participants is 30. Additional information (programme, registration, location, etc) can be found at the website linked above. For all other questions, please contact the Summer school secretary, Ionela Tranca, ionela.tranca@ens.fr. Posted: 3/27/13.

Field Studies in Rainforest Ecology: Enrollment is now open for a June 2013 Field Studies in Rainforest Ecology Course. The course is offered through the Maderas Rainforest Conservancy, a non-profit organization that owns two education and field research stations -- 1) Ometepe Biological Field Station in Nicaragua, 2) LaSuerte Biological Field Station in Costa Rica. This course is a hands-on, project-based, field experience to familiarize participants with the diversity of life in the rainforests of the Meso-American Biological Corridor while developing a deeper understanding of tropical forest ecology and conservation. The focus of this course will be on the differences between the cloud forest environments in Nicaragua and the lowland, coastal rainforests of northeastern Costa Rica. With a combination of lectures and fieldwork, time is spent on studying the diverse fauna in a tropical forest through various ecological sampling methods. Through on-site research projects students will build a foundation of skills and knowledge that are applicable to field research of any taxa. Although much of the emphasis in this course will be on insect ecology, this course will be appropriate for students interested in any organism, plant or animal, as the content of the course can be adapted to any taxa of interest. Student projects will focus on ecological research, quantitative natural history, and behavior of organisms that are of most interest to the students. Please note that although the emphasis for this course is on insects, don't let this be the reason you don't take this course. I will be happy to adapt the curriculum to be suitable for any taxa of interest. Additionally, although university credit is not offered through the Maderas Rainforest Conservancy, course credit can be arranged either through your home institution or through Truman State University. For additional information, including a course flier and syllabus, please contact LaRoy Brandt (Lbrandt@truman.edu). Posted: 3/20/13.

Sustainable Ecuador—From the Andes to the Amazon: Location: Ecuador - Quito and the Amazon Basin Arrive Date: 06/30/13 End Date: 07/28/13. This course examines the historical development and current situation of Ecuador’s indigenous peoples, with special emphasis on issues of environmental sustainability. Using lectures, seminar discussions and fieldwork, the course underscores the impact that economic and political factors have on the process of indigenous cultural adaptation. Students will develop individual research/creative projects, and they will have the opportunity to interact with indigenous Amazonian youth with whom they will share knowledge and the community life-style of the tropical rain forest of the Amazon. The Amazon tropical rainforest of Ecuador (selva amazónica in Spanish) is a humid evergreen forest that covers the largest portion of Ecuador’s four natural regions: the Andes, the Coast, the Galápagos Islands and the Amazon. For millennia dozens of indigenous peoples have settled these regions of the eastern slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes and their rivers developing extraordinary cultural adaptations to its diverse environments and creating a civilization that has been praised as a successful example of adaptive co-evolution of humans and all other species. Instructor: Stefano Varese Taught in: English More information: http://studyabroad.ucdavis.edu/programs/summerabroad/ecuador.html. Posted: 3/15/13.

Stable Isotope Ecology: Concepts, Methods and Applications: Instructor: Dr. Björn Wissel. Course Date: May 27-31, 2013. Course Place: University of Regina. Regina, SK, Canada. Applications (resume or CV, and letter of interest) will be received via email to: CIEE-ICEE@uregina.ca The deadline for applications is 05 April 2013. The Canadian Institute of Ecology and Evolution (CIEE) will provide room and board for successful graduate student applicants, as well as the course fee and all course materials and analytical supplies. Students and their supervisors will be responsible for travel costs to Regina. More information: http://ciee-icee.com/news-and-announcements. Posted: 3/14/13.

Aquatic Entomology course: This is part of OTS 2-week Graduate Specialty Courses program, which are graduate-level specialty courses (2 semester credits) which will be taught in Costa Rica, May-August, 2013. This course may be of interest to students interested in aquatic entomology, ecology and conservation biology. The course currently has OPEN enrollment. For more information please consult the OTS website www.ots.ac.cr or write to me (Andrés Santana andres.santana@ots.ac.cr) or Barbara Lewis barbara.lewis@ots.ac.cr for application information. AQUATIC ENTOMOLOGY This two week course is oriented towards advanced undergraduate and graduate students interested in intense training in the collection, identification and inquiry-based research of aquatic insects. The study of aquatic insects is not only fascinating, but ecologically and economically significant because many individuals play important roles in the flow of energy and the cycling of nutrients through ecosystems. Other aquatic insects (such as mosquitoes) are important vectors of many different diseases such as malaria and dengue. Emphasis of the field component of the course will be Neotropical species diversity, as revealed by a wide array of sampling methods. Students will gain experience in light trapping and use of various aquatic nets and other collection techniques. Posted; 3/13/13.

Advanced Terrestrial Carbon Accounting: The University of California San Diego and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) are pleased to announce the launch of a new international certificate program in Advanced Terrestrial Carbon Accounting. This unique program will train professionals from around the world on how to measure forest carbon. By using the latest scientific tools and methods to measure forest carbon, participants will be able to provide rigorous estimates of how conserving tropical forests avoids greenhouse gas emissions. In turn, the new certificate course will help participants advance major global initiatives such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in Developing Countries (REDD+). The certificate course will be held August of 2013 on the UC San Diego campus in southern California. Limited spots are available. Scholarships will be awarded to select individuals. Application information can be found at http://extension.ucsd.edu/TCA. For more information, contact Henry Devries at +1-858-534-9955. Posted: 3/11/13.

Summer Courses at College of the Atlantic, Mount Desert Island, Maine: Beginning in 2013, College of the Atlantic (COA) is pleased to offer a limited number of undergraduate classes during the summer season. Current COA students and *visiting students from other institutions are welcome to participate*. Each course is one COA credit (3.3 semester credits). Course dates and descriptions are below; you may also contact course faculty to learn more about the course and discuss whether it will be a good fit for your academic needs. Non-COA students must apply by April 1, 2013. For more information: http://www.coa.edu/summerclasses. Posted: 3/8/13.

OTS Graduate Specialty Courses: The Organization for Tropical Studies offers several 2-week graduate-level specialty courses (2 semester credits) which will be taught in Costa Rica, May-August, 2013. These courses may be of interest to students in various departments and interdisciplinary programs, as courses relate to anthropology, geography, environmental studies, sociology, and ecology and conservation biology. All courses currently have OPEN enrollment. For more information please consult the OTS website or write to Andrés Santana (andres.santana@ots.ac.cr) or Barbara Lewis barbara.lewis@ots.ac.cr for application information. Posted: 3/7/13.

Arctic Vegetation Ecology: Northern Alaska Field Course: June 6-23, 2013. For questions, please contact: Skip Walker (dawalker@alaska.edu). This course will be offered through Summer Sessions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. This 18-day, 3 credit course will be taught at the university campus, Toolik Field Station and remote localities in northern Alaska from June 6-23, 2013. The course is limited to ten finishing undergraduate or graduate students. The cost of meals, lodging and travel between the field sites is included in the course fee. Students are expected to pay for their travel to Fairbanks and meals while in Fairbanks. Students will need to bring all-weather clothing including winter jackets and rubber boots, a warm sleeping bag, and a tent. The excursion will follow the Elliott and Dalton Highways in northern Alaska, focusing on the vegetation and Arctic ecosystems north of the Brooks Rangewith emphasis in the Galbraith, Toolik Lake, Happy Valley, and Prudhoe Bay areas. An interdisciplinary approach will examine vegetation, soils, permafrost, geology, land-use and climate-change issues in a wide variety of habitats and settings along the climate gradient. Students will learn methods of vegetation, soil, and environmental sampling required for vegetation analysis. The course is appropriate for vegetation scientists and botanists, as well as students interested in an overview of the Arctic, its ecosystems, and its role in contemporary discussions of climate change and land-use change. Further information, The 2013 Arctic Vegetation Ecology Northern Alaska Field Course (BIOL 495/695), is one of a series of vegetation science courses offered at UAF. Posted: 3/7/13.

GIS Applications in Aquatic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology: An NSF supported three day aquatic GIS training workshop will be offered at Saint Louis University on June 12-14, 2013. A general goal of this workshop is to train and establish an interactive group of researchers and educators applying GIS techniques in aquatic systems. Applicants with all levels of GIS experience are welcome; however, the workshop will be presented for aquatic biologists with little to no background in GIS techniques. The tentative schedule of topics includes: 1) basic acquisition and manipulation of GIS data, 2) GIS data sources for aquatic research, 3) quantification of species’ habitat use at multiple spatial scales, 4) species distribution modeling, and 5) development and application of hydrologic data to studies of aquatic systems. The majority of the training will be conducted using ArcGIS 10.1; however, other software options will be presented. Computer space will be provided for each attendee. The workshop is open to Faculty, Research Scientists, Postdoctoral Researchers, and Graduate Students conducting research in aquatic systems. There is no cost for the workshop; however, participants will be responsible for meals, travel, and lodging. Details and updates will be available at the link above. To apply, please email a statement of application including a description of your research interests (maximum 1 page) and a CV to Dr. Jason Knouft at aquaticgis@slu.edu. Review of applications will begin on April 1, 2013. GIS experience is not a prerequisite for the workshop. Posted: 3/1/13.

Lacawac Ecological Observatory Workshop: We are excited to announce the second annual “Lacawac Ecological Observatory Workshop (LEOW)” to be held June 26-29, 2013 at Lacawac Sanctuary in Lake Ariel, Pennsylvania. This workshop is being held with Kent State University and Miami University’s NSF Environmental Aquatic Resource Sensing IGERT program. LEOW will focus on advanced sensors, continental scale ecology approaches, and management/analysis of large ecological datasets. A preliminary agenda, registration form, and more information can be found at http://lacawac.org/?p=94. Registration must be received by June 7, 2013. Please contact Lesley Knoll (knolllb@MiamiOH.edu) if you have any questions about the workshop. Posted: 2/27/13.

Functional Traits Course in Colombia: We are pleased to announce the opening of the 4th version of an intensive course on Functional Traits (May 26-31, 2013) that will take place in Villa de Leyva, Colombia. The course is open to graduate students, postdocs and researchers/professors interested in broadening their knowledge in functional ecology and is offered in English. Candidates should complete a brief form (see below) and send a copy of their CV to juan.posada@urosario.edu.co. The inscription costs US$300 and will cover lodging in a shared room, breakfast and transportation to the field. You must provide your own means of transportation to Bogota. The deadline for submission is March 15th and results will be communicated on April 1st. This course is a comprehensive introduction to the concepts and theories related to the functional traits of organisms, with a particular emphasis on plants. Students use a trait-based approach to examine the response of organisms to environmental gradients, to explore community assembly and to understand how plant functions can be scaled to the ecosystem level. Lectures include application of the approach to understand biotic responses to land use change, to global change and provision of ecosystem services at the landscape scale. A brief introduction to existing trait databases, their correct utilization and to the growing discipline of eco-informatics is presented. This fourth version of the course will take place in the Andean tropics and will include hands-on experience of measurement of functional traits and a field trip to an upper mountain tropical rain forest and a paramo ecosystem. Confirmed Professors: • Eric Garnier (CNRS, CEFE, France) • Bill Shipley (U. of Sherbrooke, Canada) • Alison Munson (U. Laval, Canada) • Arne Saatkamp (AMU & IMBE, France) • Juan Posada (U. of El Rosario, Colombia) • Sandra Lavorel (CNRS, LECA, France) • Francesco De Bello (Czech Academy of Sciences and U. of South Bohemia, Czech Republic). Please complete this form and attach a copy of your cv: First, middle and last name: Gender (male/female): University/Work Address: Work phone number: Personal phone number: E-mail address: Essay. Please describe your current professional activities, research interests and what you expect from this course (max. 300 words). For more information: juan.posada@urosario.edu.co or Alison Munson. Posted: 2/27/13.

Workshop in Ecological Analysis and Synthesis: The National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) is pleased to invite applications from early-career researchers for a 3-week intensive workshop in ecological analysis and synthesis, to take place at NCEAS in Santa Barbara CA June 19-July 10, 2013. All travel and living expenses of participants will be covered during the workshop, thanks to generous support from the Packard Foundation. Applications are due March 1. For more information and application instructions, see the link above. We hope that you'll personally encourage your early-career colleagues to contact us with any questions and apply to come work with us this summer! This workshop is a first for us, so we are especially interested in feedback, and flexible on the guidelines for applicants. We want to find out what works for the community. Posted: 2/21/13.

Transcriptomics Workshop: For all ecologists and organismal biologists who want to adopt gene expression analysis in their work: in June 12-28, 2013, we will be running back-to-back workshops on tag-based RNA-seq and on quantitative PCR. We endeavor to introduce people with minimal or even no prior molecular and bioinformatic experience to the analysis of global gene expression using a low-cost version of RNA-seq ($50/sample, Meyer et al, Mol Ecol 2011, 17: 3599-3616), and right after that we will teach quantitative PCR, the gold standard for validating RNA-seq results. Please see the details (why we are doing it, what exactly do we offer, how much it costs, and how to apply) here: The Art of Gene Expression Analysis (AGEA) The deadline for applications is April 15, 2013. Posted: 2/21/13.

Summer field courses in Southeast Alaska’s Inside Passage: The Tatoosh School is an independent, university-level field school with seasonal offices in Portland, Oregon and classrooms in the towns, oceans, and forests of Alaska’s Inside Passage. It is the school’s mission to foster first-hand learning about the ecology and environmental policy of southern Southeast Alaska. Rigorous academics focus on the development of a sense of place and passion for civic engagement, and a sound knowledge of the Pacific coastal rainforest. Students earn 12 units of credit and leave empowered to explore their surroundings with wide-eyed curiosity and to reach out as active and informed citizens. Traveling by sea kayak through the islands that make up Southeast’s Alexander Archipelago provides students with the opportunity to build outdoor leadership and technical skills. Lectures and assignments delve into topics ranging from island biogeography to contemporary timber management. Innovative curricula teach scientific curiosity and civic engagement in ways that students can take home and practice, building a six-week field course into a lifelong passion for wild learning. Tatoosh School students become field scientists by participating in several established long-term ecological research programs together with our partners. These exciting projects provide students the opportunity to apply their understandings of Southeast’s dynamic terrestrial, riparian, and nearshore marine ecosystems while contributing to a valuable body of scientific data that is, in turn, used to inform management decisions across the region. Course I - June 19 through July 29, 2013. Course II - August 2 through September 11, 2013. Academic Course Descriptions (offered concurrently during both 6-week expeditions): Natural History & Ecology of Southeast Alaska (6 units) Southeast Alaska encompasses the Alexander Archipelago - composed of more than 5,000 islands -and a narrow strip of mountainous mainland, split by glacial fiords and major river systems. The land is home to an array of plant and animal life, and is considered the front lines of study in island biogeography. This course explores the natural environment from the nearshore intertidal zone to the high alpine, examining the adaptations and relationships of organisms to their environments over time and space. Politics of Place: Southeast Alaska (6 units) This course explores the political landscape of Southeast Alaska and covers a wide range of topics including land ownership, public and private land management, conservation strategies, local and regional economies, Alaska Native cultures, land settlements, corporate structures and current resource management issues. It focuses on the evolution of social and legal structures and how those structures guide current decision-making. Inquiry and reason are applied to real-life challenges, and students engage with citizens and policymakers to consider solutions. Posted: 2/21/13.

Summer 2013 Field Ecology Courses: Are you looking for ecology courses to gain real field experience, where hands-on learning outside under the open sky is emphasized? Join us for summer session at the Flathead Lake Biological Station, a University of Montana Center of Excellence. From June 17 through August 9, 2013, we offer immersion-based, rigorous field-oriented classes. - Accelerate your coursework: Up to 13 credits in 8 weeks and gain real field experience - Low student/instructor ratios with enrollment cap of 13 per course, geographically diverse student population - $1,755 for tuition, housing and meals per 2 week course - Many generous scholarships up to $4,000 available For complete information and online registration, go to: 2013 Summer Session. Offerings: Field Ecology, Landscape Ecology, Conservation Ecology, Stream Ecology, Lake Ecology, Ecology of Forests and Grasslands, Alpine Ecology, Seminars in Ecology & Resource Management. Posted: 2/20/13.

Summer Workshops at the Southwestern Research Station in Portal, Arizona: NEW!! CONSERVATION MEDICINE AND DISEASES OF AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES: 23 - 28 June 2013. The workshop is designed for undergraduates and graduate students in Conservation Ecology, Wildlife, Biological Sciences, and Veterinary Medicine who expect to study, breed, and manage populations of amphibians and/or reptiles in the field and in captivity. "What does Conservation Medicine Mean" and "How can it be Functionally Used to Manage Populations of Amphibians and Reptiles" will be explored. Concepts of infectious diseases, anesthesia, use of pain medications, sampling techniques, surgical techniques, and handling of venomous species will be covered. ANTS OF THE SOUTHWEST: 17 - 26 July 2013. This workshop is designed for students, biologists, and other individuals who have some background in biology at the college level. This course is designed with curriculum that complements rather than competes with the California Academy of Sciences Ant Course. Although we will cover basic taxonomy and systematics, the major focus of this course will be on the ecology and behavior of ants. HERPETOLOGY FIELD COURSE: 28 July - 6 August 2013. Participants will gain knowledge on the outstanding biodiversity of amphibians and reptiles found in a wide diversity of habitats throughout southeastern Arizona and parts of southwestern New Mexico. Participants will obtain hands-on experience in amphibian and reptile identification, collecting and marking techniques, and data documentation. The course also will cover specimen preparation of a full museum voucher specimen, including tissue vouchers. LEPIDOPTERA COURSE: 8 - 17 August 2013. Designed for students, amateur naturalists, conservation biologists, and other biologists who have an interest in learning more about butterflies and moths, the course will emphasize taxonomy, ecology, and field identification of lepidopterans in southeastern Arizona. Lectures will include background information on the biology of animals and their importance in pollination biology. Field trips will provide participants with collecting, sampling, and observation techniques and lab work will provide instruction on specimen identification, preparation, and labeling. Other courses at the SWRS. Posted: 2/19/13.

Conservation field course in Brazil's Atlantic Forest: University of Colorado-Boulder Study Abroad Programs is offering a conservation biology field course in Brazil this May. The course "Conservation Biology & Practice in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest" is held in a 'conservation crisis' setting - the Atlantic Forest of eastern Brazil. This ecoregion is a highly threatened center of faunal and floral biodiversity. Because much of the forest is in human-dominated landscapes, successful conservation practice can only occur jointly with efforts to alleviate socioeconomic issues. In two and a half weeks, the course offers students hands-on experience through on-going conservation programs that couple biological understanding with practice. The course is based out of the educational facilities of one of Brazil's largest environmental non-governmental organizations. On a four-day fieldtrip to the coast, participants will visit and learn about conservation in practice in the 1000-km long Serra do Mar Biodiversity Corridor. The course is designed for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students in disciplines pertinent to conservation and is open to students enrolled in US institutions. Dates are 13-30 May 2013. Application deadline is 4 March 13. For more information, please the link above. Interested students are invited to contact Dr. Timothy Kittel (email: kittel@colorado.edu / skype: tim.kittel) or program advisors by email: studyabr@colorado.edu, phone: (303) 492-7741. Posted: 2/14/13.

14th Annual International Agroecology Shortcourse: In 2013, for only the second time in its history, the International Agroecology Shortcourse will be held in Vermont. From July 7th-20th, participants from around the world will gather at UVM to learn about "Agroecological Approaches for Climate Change and Food Systems Resilience." What is agriculture's role in contributing to climate change? What are opportunities within agriculture to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate? When we talk about agriculture, do we mean smallholder farmers, industrial agriculture or both? These questions will be on the table during the 14th Annual International Agroecology Shortcourse, where the theme is the application of agroecological approaches to support resilience to climate change and promote robust, sustainable food systems. Farmers are constantly innovating in their daily practice, and much can be learned by identifying and analyzing existing agricultural management strategies that have the potential to adapt to and/or mitigate climate changes. By integrating ecological and social sciences with farmer's knowledge, agroecologists believe it is possible to both design and manage more sustainable agri-food systems and address global environmental change. For more information, view the course website. Posted: 2/8/13.

Rainforest and Wildlife Conservation in Uganga: A rare opportunity to learn tropical ecology and conservation from Tom Struhsaker, who worked in Kibale Forest, Uganda for decades! DANTA is advertising this: We are delighted to announce a new course offering for summer 2013, “Rain forest and Wildlife Conservation” to be led by Dr. Thomas Struhsaker. Thomas Struhsaker, PhD, received his B.Sc. in Biological Sciences from Michigan State University in 1960 and his PhD in Zoology in 1965 from the University of California, Berkeley. For the past 40 years, his research has focused primarily on tropical ecosystems and conservation in Africa. He is the author of over 120 publications and the 2006 recipient of the International Primatological Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award. The workshop is open to everyone, university students seeking credit or those simply looking to further their knowledge. The dates are July 5 – July 15, 2013 and it will be held in the spectacular Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. The workshop will explore the impact of agriculture (e.g., palm oil plantations, cattle ranching, United Fruit), international development, tourism and human population growth on tropical conservation and global climate change. It will also cover various economic paradigms, conservation strategies, sustainability and methods of assessment. For more information, please email: conservation@danta.info. Posted: 2/8/13.

NCEAS Summer 2013 Training Institute: The National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) is pleased to invite applications from early-career researchers for a 3-week intensive training workshop in ecological analysis and synthesis, to take place at NCEAS in Santa Barbara CA June 19-July 10, 2013. All travel and living expenses of participants will be covered during the workshop, thanks to generous support from the Packard Foundation. Applications are due March 1. More information and application instructions. Posted: 2/8/13.

Metacommunity Ecology and Evolution: ELME (Enhancing Linkages between Mathematics and Ecology) is a summer educational program at the Kellogg Biological Station. ELME 2013 will focus on metacommunity ecology and evolution. In this advanced hands-on three-week course, students will learn the basics of metacommunity theory and apply their knowledge to independent modeling projects. A wide variety of approaches to spatial ecology will be employed. Dates: June 3-21, 2013, Deadline: March 22, 2013. Posted: 2/8/13.

Field Biology Courses & Workshops at Highlands Biological Station: The Highlands Biological Station, an inter-institutional research center of the University of North Carolina, is offering its 2013 series of summer courses and workshops that can be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit toward your academic program. The following list of field-based courses and workshops are focused on the diversity of organisms in the region with special emphasis on identification and collection techniques as well as principles of evolution, ecology, and conservation. Scholarships, Grants-in-Aid of Research for graduate students, and summer internships are also available. Highlands, North Carolina, is located in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, at an average elevation of 3,800 feet, and situated near the Nantahala National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Cherokee Indian Reservation, Appalachian Trail, and the Blue Ridge Parkway. For more information (detailed descriptions, pre-requisites, etc.) and to apply, visit www.highlandsbiological.org/summercourses/, e-mail kkandl@email.wcu.edu or msruigrok@email.wcu.edu, or call (828) 526-2602. Posted: 2/5/13.

Summer Soil Institute: your opportunity to gain an integrated perspective with world-renowned faculty to address critical questions using current analytical techniques, experimental approaches, and instructional models. The Summer Soil Institute is designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students, post-docs, faculty and professionals. The SSI Faculty Instructors include: Thomas Borch, Richard Conant, Francesca Cotrufo, Gene Kelly, John Moore, Mary Stromberger, Joe von Fischer, Diana Wall, and Matthew Wallenstein. SSI will be held on July 7-20, 2013, and is located at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. The deadline to apply for the upcoming 4th Annual Summer Soil Institute is rapidly approaching. Applications due March 8, 2013. For more information and to apply, please visit our website, linked above. After reviewing the website, if you are interested in attending SSI this year and would like more information, please Email us at: soil@nrel.colostate.edu. Posted: 2/4/13.

Likelihood Methods in Ecology: The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies will offer an intensive one-week course in the use of likelihood methods in ecology from April 22nd - 26th, 2013. The methods provide a powerful tool for linking models and data, and provide a flexible alternative to traditional, parametric statistical analyses. Labs will be based on use of the R statistical computing package. The course will be taught on the campus of the Cary Institute, in Millbrook, New York (roughly 90 miles north of New York City). The $750 course fee includes housing during the course in Institute housing. Students will be responsible for their travel expenses and meals. Course fees must be submitted by April 1, 2013. Details on how to submit the fees will be sent after initial registration. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the concepts and methods of use of likelihood and information theory in data analysis and statistical modeling. The labs will focus on the use of software tools in R that allow the students to construct their own analyses and models. Most of the examples used in the course will be drawn from forest ecology. The course is intended for graduate students, post-docs, and practicing scientists. An undergraduate or graduate level background in statistics is desired, but the course will teach the basic principles of probability theory required for the methods. Students will need to be familiar with R. For novices, we will post a set of tutorials to provide a basic introduction to R - these should be completed before the start of the class. Class size will be limited to 16 students. To register, send an e-mail to Charles Canham at canhamc@caryinstitute.org containing your name, mailing address, e-mail address, phone number and a brief statement of your research interests. Please put "2013 Likelihood Course Registration" in the subject line of the message. Posted: 2/1/13.

Summer Courses at Reelfoot Lake Environmental Field Station: The University of Tennessee at Martin Reelfoot Lake Environmental Field Station is happy to announce its 2013 Maymester/Summer field courses. Anyone interested in enrolling in courses should contact Dr. Tom Blanchard at tblanch@utm.edu. See the link above for course details, application form, and more information about the field station. Posted: 1/31/13.

Summer Institute in Sustainable Agriculture: We are pleased to announce the fourth year of our Summer Institute in Sustainable Agriculture at Willamette University’s Zena Farm just 10 miles west of Salem, OR. The program will take place from May 20-June 28, 2013. It provides students from liberal arts colleges and non-agriculturalmajors from larger institutions the opportunity to pursue both hands-on organic farming experience and interdisciplinary academic coursework that examines the ecological, social, economic, and ethical implications of agricultural systems in the US, while living in a sustainable community in the heart of the Willamette Valley. The courses offered for academic credit are: Perspectives on Sustainable Agriculture, a class that examines the ethical, economic, and social implications of different agricultural practices through a historic lens; and Agroecology, a class that investigates farming from an agroecological perspective. These classes are taught in the mornings (MWF or TTH) by Willamette faculty members in a 1910 farmhouse located on the site. We will be happy to work with your home institution to arrange the transfer of credits. More information. Posted: 1/29/13.

Coral Reef Internship in Marine Ecology and Conservation: The Central Caribbean Marine Institute (CCMI), a US non-profit organization, UK and Cayman Islands charity, has openings in our ‘Coral Reef Internship in Marine Ecology and Conservation program’ for students who want to excel in Coral Reef science and develop hands-on skills in Research, Marine Ecology and Conservation. Applications close March 1st for this unique opportunity to: - be a part of solving real-life conservation issues - conduct field research alongside leading Scientists - develop an individual research project - gain course credit in Marine Ecology and Conservation (4 course credits Rutgers Univ. Inst. of Marine & Coastal Sci.) - and gain diving / snorkelling experience for research on one the Caribbean’s top ranked coral reefs. Course dates: Saturday 29th June – Tuesday July 16th. Location: Little Cayman Research Centre, Little Cayman Island, Cayman Islands, Caribbean. More information. Posted: 1/28/13.

Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Graduate and Professional Training Courses at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Front Royal, VA, USA. Visit http://smconservation.gmu.edu/ for course details and for instructions on how to apply. The courses below will be held in a brand-new sustainably built Academic Quad, including new classrooms, dining commons and residential facility. Estimating Animal Abundance and Occupancy -April 1-May 12, 2013 (must apply now to be considered!); Species Monitoring and Conservation: Terrestrial Mammals -April 29-May 10, 2013 (apply before February 18). Participants in SMSC courses can earn Continuing Education Units or graduate course credits (at extra cost and upon completion of additional coursework) through George Mason University depending on qualifications. Additional Upcoming Courses: * Species Monitoring and Conservation: Reptiles (May 13-24, 2013) - new course! * Non-Invasive Genetic Techniques in Wildlife Conservation (June 1-7, 2013) * Adaptive Management for Conservation Success (June 10-21, 2013) * Species Monitoring and Conservation: Migratory Birds (Sept. 9-20, 2013) - new course! * Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation (Sept. 30- Oct. 11, 2013 * Conservation Breeding Centers for Wildlife Sustainability (Oct. 7-14, 2013) - new course! * Applied Climate Change: Gaining practical skills for climate change adaptation (Oct. 21-Nov. 1, 2013). Posted: 1/28/13.

High Performance Computing in the Life/Medical Sciences: Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech is hosting a "High Performance Computing in the Life/Medical Sciences" 2-week summer institute sponsored by the National Science Foundation. This summer 2-week intensive course (July 22- Aug. 2, 2013) is directed towards eligible undergraduates, graduate students and postdocs interested in further developing their expertise in biology relevant high performance and data intensive computing field. During the course, participants will attend lectures and discussions by leading field members including academic and industrial affiliates and work on a group research project with three other course participants. The course is supported by a NSF Funded Award No. OCI-1124123. A travel stipend, including lodging (in a Virginia Tech dorm room) and sustenance (primarily from the Virginia Tech dining halls) is provided. Application deadline is March 30th. Posted: 1/24/13.

Coastal Herpetology is once again being offered through the University of Southern Mississippi. This summer short course will be held from May 13-24, 2013 at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in beautiful Ocean Springs, MS. Topics covered include the identification, life history, and ecology of amphibians and reptiles of the northern Gulf Coast. This course will provide students with an introduction to field herpetology through lectures, discussions, a class project, and many field excursions. College credit is available. For more information, visit us at www.usm.edu/gcrl or contact the instructor, Dr. Matthew Chatfield, at mattchat@tulane.edu. Posted: 1/24/13.

Field Course On Tropical Insect Ecology: During the June 2013, I will be offering a field course on tropical insect ecology through the Maderas Rainforest Conservancy. The Maderas Rainforest Conservancy is a non-profit organization that owns two education and field research stations -- 1) Ometepe Biological Field Station in Nicaragua, 2) LaSuerte Biological Field Station in Costa Rica. This course is a hands-on, field experience to familiarize students with the diversity of life in the rainforests of the Meso-American Biological Corridor while developing a deeper understanding of tropical forest ecology and conservation. The focus of this course will be on the differences between the cloud forest environments in Nicaragua and the lowland, coastal rainforests of northeastern Costa Rica. With a combination of lectures and fieldwork, time is spent on studying the diverse fauna in a tropical forest through various ecological sampling methods. Through on-site research projects students will build a foundation of skills and knowledge that are applicable to field research of any taxa. Although much of the emphasis in this course will be on insect ecology, this course will be appropriate for students interested in any organism, plant or animal, as the content of the course can be adapted to any taxa of interest. Student projects will focus on ecological research, quantitative natural history, and behavior of organisms that are of most interest to the students. Please note that although the emphasis for this course is on insects, don't let this be the reason you don't take this course. I will be happy to adapt the curriculum to be suitable for any taxa of interest. Additionally, although university credit is not offered through the Maderas Rainforest Conservancy, course credit can be arranged either through your home institution or through Truman State University. For additional information, including a course flier and syllabus, please contact me at Lbrandt@truman.edu. Posted: 1/24/13.

Summer Field Courses in Costa Rica: Tree Field Studies is pleased to announce four new field courses for the coming Summer 2013 season! - Tropical Entomology (Dr. Erica McAlister, Natural History Museum, London) - Tropical Ornithology (Dr. Terry Master, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania) - Introduction to Primate Behavior & Ecology (Dr. Lorna Joachim, University of New Mexico) - Primate Conservation in the Tropics (Dr. Sarah Carnegie, Science in Schools, Toronto, ON & University of Calgary) Check out our website for more information! http://treefieldstudies.wordpress.com/ Or email us for further details: treefieldstudies@gmail.com. Posted: 1/22/13.

North American Invasive Plant Ecology and Management Short Course: The 2013 NAIPSC is now open for registration. Similar to previous years, the 2013 NAIPSC Field Course will include presentations, hands-on workshops, site visits and instructor-led discussion sessions on the latest in invasive plant ecology and management. The NAIPSC Special Session for 2013 is on the topic of biocontrol. Registration can be done either online or by downloading a brochure from the NAIPSC website. While there, be sure to check out the new NAIPSC Online Community that features relevant webinars, interesting articles, and opportunities to interact on any topic related to invasive plants. Also new is the Invasive Weed Ecology Program, which has some interesting information and thoughtful insights on invasive plants. The third annual NAIPSC Field Course will be held June 25-27, 2013 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln West Central Research & Extension Center in North Platte, NE. CEU and graduate student credit will be available. Posted: 1/11/13.

Summer School in Individual-based Modeling: Dresden University of Technology. This summer course has been offered since 2007. The course will provide an overview of the state-of-the art in individual- and agent-based modelling, model development, implementation, parameterization, and sensitivity analysis. Further topics are handling uncertainty in data, designing simulation experiments, and statistical analysis of simulation results. The class is intended primarily for PhD students in relevant subject areas (e.g., ecology, biology, forest ecology, environmental sciences, physics, systems analysis, social sciences etc.) strongly interested in using IBMs/ABMs in their study, and those looking for effective strategies for analyzing models and conducting simulation experiments. The course will use NetLogo modelling software in combination with the R platform for statistical analyses. Basic knowledge of both Netlogo and R is required. Material introducing NetLogo and R will be provided before the course. The lecturers are Uta Berger (TUD, Germany), Volker Grimm (UFZ, Germany), Steve Railsback (USA), and Cyril Piou (CIRAD, France). All of them are ecologists, so most of their example models will be from ecology. Scholars from other disciplines are also welcome. The course will consist of lectures, exercises, and extensive modelling projects to be presented in groups at the end of the course. Credit Points: 4 ECTS. Schedule 9 days + tutorial-driven self-study in advance. Date 4. - 12.July 2013. Location National Park House “Saxon Switzerland” Bad Schandau, Germany. Number of Participants max 25. Course fee 800 Euro including tuition, accommodation and breakfast. Accommodation includes cooking facilities available for other meals. Application via http://www.forst.tu-dresden.de/summerschool/. Application deadline: 28. February 2013. Contact: summerschool@forst.tu-dresden.de. Posted: 1/9/13.

Teaching Individual-based Modeling short course: Humboldt State University will again offer a one-week short course on individual-based modeling, in June 2013, with instructors Steve Railsback, Volker Grimm, and Steve Lytinen. The course is directed primarily at college-level faculty interested in teaching individual-based (or "agent-based") modeling classes based on the new textbook by Railsback and Grimm. However, we should also be able to accommodate others interested more in research applications. The course is interdisciplinary and open to people in all fields, although the instructors' experience is mainly in ecology. Topics include theoretical and methodological issues in agent-based science, but a major goal will be developing enough experience with the NetLogo software platform for participants to subsequently teach themselves and others how to implement and analyze scientific models in NetLogo. This year the class will be co-sponsored by DePaul University's College of Computing and Digital Media and held near their campus in downtown Chicago. Low-cost dormitory housing will be available. Because the class size is limited, there is a very simple application process, with applications due by 28 February. Additional information and the on-line application are at: http://www.humboldt.edu/ibm. Posted: 1/9/13.

Summer School on Evolution: 1st International SUMMER School on Evolution, July 15th - 19th, 2